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Heatwave

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 1:45 am
by macliam
Lucky old me - I make it out to Portugal just in time for the hottest period in years. Today it was 41.6 decrees at 3pm (and it is still 31.5 degrees now!). Tomorrow they are talking about a possible 46 degrees and 40+ temperatures lasting until Tuesday!!

Luckily my house is a traditional build "monte" with walls made of "Taipa" or rammed earth, which is warm in winter and cool in summer. With windows and shutters closed, this has kept OK over the last couple of days without a/c, but is gradually warming as time goes by - so whether it lasts until Tuesday will be interesting.

For those of you with no concept of what these temperatures mean, any work outside must be completed before 10am (so the dogs get fed and walked at about 7am) and then you lock-down until about 8pm. Opening the front door between these times is like opening the door of a hot oven, the hot air just hits you immediately. My big pond is already way down, despite a fairly cool summer until now, the turtles have stopped sunbathing and the frogs are quite quiet in the evening. Even for somewhere which regularly sees temperatures in the mid-30s, this is a step too far!

Global warming? What global warming!

Re: Heatwave

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 9:37 am
by blythburgh
I should have known but was amazed that when the Met Office etc gave out wise and correct advice they were accused of Nanny Stating etc.

Curtains at the front of our house are kept drawn with closed windows everywhere until the evening. The rear of the house faces north so it is fine to keep curtains open but not the windows.

And stripping off is not the answer, wear lose fitting clothing that will move as you move. As a burner rather than a tanner I had kept covered but a friend who spent a lot of her childhood and teens in Africa and the Middle East gave me the advice to wear lose clothing.

And when I do venture out I am shocked at the amount of windows open (letting in the hot outisde air) and worse dogs being walked. Babies and animals need to be kept out of the heat of the day. And that includes outdoor animals whose hutches etc need to be in a shady area.

Re: Heatwave

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 11:20 am
by kevinchess1
So you live in a Thermos flask?
I thinking it's shockiny that you, a pensioner, cant afford Air conditioning
I'm working at the soup kitchen today I'll try and organise a collection for you :thumbup:

Re: Heatwave

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 11:41 am
by blythburgh
kevinchess1 wrote:So you live in a Thermos flask?
I thinking it's shockiny that you, a pensioner, cant afford Air conditioning
I'm working at the soup kitchen today I'll try and organise a collection for you :thumbup:

No thank you, a lot of air conditioning in shops and even in our car succeeds in making me hot. She who rarely sweats can break out in a sweat in the middle of winter having left her coat and sweater in the locker at Norwich Castle. Worse still is my breathing gets more and more laboured. Thankfully Norwich Castle and The Sainsbury Centre have different air con these days but I can still get caught out in many shops. 'im indoors asked if we could use the air con instead of opening windows in the car when we went to Halesworth a mere 18 miles away. I had only got to the turn off at Blythburgh when my throat was constricted and my body sweating so off it went.

But if you think you are suffering think of those who work in kitchens.

Re: Heatwave

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 12:03 pm
by macliam
kevinchess1 wrote:So you live in a Thermos flask?
I thinking it's shockiny that you, a pensioner, cant afford Air conditioning
I'm working at the soup kitchen today I'll try and organise a collection for you :thumbup:
Don't need or want it - strangely you seem to imagine that I have some kind of tourist villa, whereas this is a traditional smallholding in the hills and about an hour from the sea (in two directions). The upside is that I'm not surrounded by expats (although there are some here), the downside is that there are no sea breezes to cut the heat. But, it's normally a lot better than being inland, on the plains near the Spanish border - Amaraleja holds the second highest recorded temperature in Europe (47.3C).... it's 38c there at the moment. Here, it's 36.8c now and forecast to hit 46c at 3pm.

I drove to the supermarket in town this morning, I arrived at 9am and it was already packed (it's the beginning of the month and the start of the traditional holiday period, so extra wages). 15km, no problems, no melting asphalt, but still 32C by the time I drove home just after 9.30......

This house is no thermos flask - the walls are 60-80cm deep, so it takes time for the interior to show any effect of outside conditions, the windows and doors are sized and placed to suit the conditions and the ceilings slope from a minimum of about 3m to 5m. Modern building methods don't come close, unless you have 25+cm of insulation in the walls... so people in new builds have their aircon running 24/7.

Re: Heatwave

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 5:15 pm
by AAAlphaThunder
macliam wrote:Lucky old me - I make it out to Portugal just in time for the hottest period in years. Today it was 41.6 decrees at 3pm (and it is still 31.5 degrees now!). Tomorrow they are talking about a possible 46 degrees and 40+ temperatures lasting until Tuesday!!

Luckily my house is a traditional build "monte" with walls made of "Taipa" or rammed earth, which is warm in winter and cool in summer. With windows and shutters closed, this has kept OK over the last couple of days without a/c, but is gradually warming as time goes by - so whether it lasts until Tuesday will be interesting.

For those of you with no concept of what these temperatures mean, any work outside must be completed before 10am (so the dogs get fed and walked at about 7am) and then you lock-down until about 8pm. Opening the front door between these times is like opening the door of a hot oven, the hot air just hits you immediately. My big pond is already way down, despite a fairly cool summer until now, the turtles have stopped sunbathing and the frogs are quite quiet in the evening. Even for somewhere which regularly sees temperatures in the mid-30s, this is a step too far!

Global warming? What global warming!
Well done macliam - you worked hard day-in day-out and deserve the fruits of your labour.

I imagine it being a bit magical having your own natural pond?

In your opinion a good investment?

Re: Heatwave

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 8:18 pm
by macliam
SWMBO is Portuguese and had a house here, so it wasn't such a stretch.... although I took 7 years to find the right place. :crazy:

The house is a 2-bedroom traditional farmhouse or "monte" with about 3Ha land (mainly schist) and about 12Km from the nearest town. Since summers tend to be long and dry it has a dammed pool called a "barragem" about the size of my garden in England to store water (common here). When I was buying, I was told that any body of water here is likely to have either crayfish or turtles..... I got the inedible ones :(

You can't help but be reminded you are "abroad", given the clumps of Cistus and Lavender, plus 10-foot Yuccas which throw out waxy flower-spikes most years and huge Agaves. A lot of the "weeds" are cultivated as house plants in the UK. Then there are the lizards, skinks, salamanders and praying mantis. Unfortunately, these come with the downside - scorpions and other biting insects ..... but the worst are the horse-flies that exist in the UK too. Nobody I know has been stung by a scorpion, I've probably seen 5 in 6 years or so, but they do look nasty ...... however the sting is not much worse than a bee sting, so no fatalities!

So, as an experience, it's great - really peaceful and fairly unspoiled - but it's hardly a lock-up and leave. There are always things that need doing and when we bought we hadn't anticipated any health issues. But then, I have a different climate, a different culture and great food and wine on my doorstep. So, is it a good investment? Well, it's unlikely to lose money, but it can take a while to sell. For me it's just another life.

Re: Heatwave

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 8:25 pm
by AAAlphaThunder
macliam wrote:SWMBO is Portuguese and had a house here, so it wasn't such a stretch.... although I took 7 years to find the right place. :crazy:

The house is a 2-bedroom traditional farmhouse or "monte" with about 3Ha land (mainly schist) and about 12Km from the nearest town. Since summers tend to be long and dry it has a dammed pool called a "barragem" about the size of my garden in England to store water (common here). When I was buying, I was told that any body of water here is likely to have either crayfish or turtles..... I got the inedible ones :(

You can't help but be reminded you are "abroad", given the clumps of Cistus and Lavender, plus 10-foot Yuccas which throw out waxy flower-spikes most years and huge Agaves. A lot of the "weeds" are cultivated as house plants in the UK. Then there are the lizards, skinks, salamanders and praying mantis. Unfortunately, these come with the downside - scorpions and other biting insects ..... but the worst are the horse-flies that exist in the UK too. Nobody I know has been stung by a scorpion, I've probably seen 5 in 6 years or so, but they do look nasty ...... however the sting is not much worse than a bee sting, so no fatalities!

So, as an experience, it's great - really peaceful and fairly unspoiled - but it's hardly a lock-up and leave. There are always things that need doing and when we bought we hadn't anticipated any health issues. But then, I have a different climate, a different culture and great food and wine on my doorstep. So, is it a good investment? Well, it's unlikely to lose money, but it can take a while to sell. For me it's just another life.
That's interesting.

I can see the allure of "just another life." I'm hoping to do the same one day but just need to settle my finances and find the right country, then right region, the right town and then right village. Brexit looks to have made my plans potentially unachievable.

Wish me luck?

Re: Heatwave

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 9:56 pm
by macliam
More difficult certainly, but people lived abroad before the EU, so not unachievable.

The bigger issue is that the fall in the comparative value of sterling has made everything far more expensive and you may no longer have many of the little agreements which make life more bearable. If the UK economy tanks short-term, it may also be that most western-european countries will be out of reach.

We'll all need luck......