NHS problems

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blythburgh
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NHS problems

Post by blythburgh » Sat Jan 13, 2018 11:39 am

I think the current system where hospitals have hardly an empty bed to put new patients in is the fault of these things:

1) We are closing the small local hospitals. In the 1980's I had my stomach sliced open and 2 years later they cut me open again at the same place. I did not need to be in the main hospital but they were worried that the closeness of the two ops in the same place could cause problems. Solution was to move me to a nearby small hospital which had a fully trained nurse on each ward, some lesser trained nurses and a Doctor on call if needed but not actually in the hospital. Most of the beds were for elderly patients but a very small ward was for Gynie patients like me.

In the lat 1990's a friend had a hip replacement (she was in her 50's so an unusual age to need 2 new hips) and she was sent from the main hospital to the one in our town. There a nurse was on hand if there were problems and a physiotherapist to help her recover from the op.

Both of those hospitals have now closed. Not sure what happens to joint replacement patients or if i would have been bed blocking or sent home with the risk that I could come back as an emergency patient.

2) Councils are having their Govt. grant cut year on year. So they have to cut hack their spending and one thing they have come up with is the amount of money they give to cover the cost of the elderly in residential homes. The businesses are trying to cover their costs with higher than necessary fees for those who can afford to pay. Usually fees that come from the sale of their home. But even that is not enough and many of the small and not so small businesses are closing down. Just at a time when there is an increasing need for them.

So there are no beds in the social sector or there is an argument as to who pays for the elderly person who is too ill to go home but too well to need a main hospital bed.

3) People are part of the problem. SOme decide they do not want to wait for a GP appointment so head for A and E. Others do nothing to help keep themselves healthy. Type 2 diabetes is an avoidable diseaase as are some liver problems but far too many people are eating and drinking themselves into health problems that are draining the NHS of resources and cash. And I am not just talking about the binge drinking youngsters at the weekend, the often older middle classes are drinking a few glasses of wine a day and ending up with liver problems as well. Not enough alcohol to make them drunk but too much for their poor liver to cope with.
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Derbiean
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Re: NHS problems

Post by Derbiean » Sat Jan 13, 2018 2:55 pm

The biggest problem of all is the fact that the Tories are in power and are deliberately starving the NHS of cash to force through their warped ideology.

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Re: NHS problems

Post by expressman33 » Sat Jan 13, 2018 3:32 pm

since the year 2000 the UK population has increased by over 10% with the over 60's increasing by more than this . Obviously if the number of beds doesn't keep pace with this there will eventually be a shortfall . Actually the number of beds has decreased by about 50% over the last 30 years https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/publicatio ... ed-numbers
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Re: NHS problems

Post by pakefield » Sat Jan 13, 2018 3:39 pm

The PFI funded Norfolk and Norwich hospital is going to be enlarged. They knew when it was built that it covered a fast growing area. So they built the current one smaller than the one it replaced. We said at the time that was stupid to build a smaller hospital but the experts knew better. :roll:
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Re: NHS problems

Post by William Joseph1 » Sat Jan 13, 2018 4:42 pm

expressman33 wrote:since the year 2000 the UK population has increased by over 10% with the over 60's increasing by more than this . Obviously if the number of beds doesn't keep pace with this there will eventually be a shortfall . Actually the number of beds has decreased by about 50% over the last 30 years https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/publicatio ... ed-numbers
Who will you vote for at the next election?
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blythburgh
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Re: NHS problems

Post by blythburgh » Sun Jan 14, 2018 9:49 am

William Joseph1 wrote:
expressman33 wrote:since the year 2000 the UK population has increased by over 10% with the over 60's increasing by more than this . Obviously if the number of beds doesn't keep pace with this there will eventually be a shortfall . Actually the number of beds has decreased by about 50% over the last 30 years https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/publicatio ... ed-numbers
Who will you vote for at the next election?

In my case it will depend on what each party has to offer, who I think will win in my constituency and what problems the country and my area is facing.

If it was today my vote would be LibDem but that is no guarantee that they will get my vote on election day.
Keep smiling because the light at the end of someone's tunnel may be you, Ron Cheneler

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Re: NHS problems

Post by expressman33 » Sun Jan 14, 2018 11:24 am

William Joseph1 wrote:Who will you vote for at the next election?
Who I vote for is my business ;)
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William Joseph1
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Re: NHS problems

Post by William Joseph1 » Sun Jan 14, 2018 11:29 am

expressman33 wrote:
William Joseph1 wrote:Who will you vote for at the next election?
Who I vote for is my business ;)
It is not a question that requires an answer, just some thought from each voter before they place their vote.
It is polite to thank a post. If you like it or if you feel it has helped you. Use the thumb up on the top right of the post.

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Re: NHS problems

Post by macliam » Sun Jan 14, 2018 11:58 am

The biggest problem with the NHS is that it is either a sacred cow or a cash cow, depending which side of the equation you come down on. For that reason, there is no discussion on how the NHS should evolve to face new circumstances.

The NHS was established as a cradle-to-grave, free at the point of use, health service to overcome the horrendous lack of affordable treatment for the majority of the population, the subsequent deaths due to treatable ailments and the obvious injustice of condemning people to a short and brutal life on a class basis. The problems that we now face are all largely due to the success of this model - and partly due to a creeping increase in the services offered. However, the creep in services, the costs of available treatments and the increasingly ageing population can be addressed - IF there is a will.

The other factor, as pointed out, is the appalling state of social care and the "rob Peter to pay Paul" cuts in provision. Social care is a national issue, like health, why it is treated as a local issue is beyond me. Equally, why we are able to build and run hospitals to look after the sick, but must relay on the private sector to build, run or supply social care facilities is beyond me. Putting a price on someone's welfare seems to me to be an invitation to the unscrupulous to provide as little as possible for as high a price as possible. Relying on a private sector based on profit to provide ongoing social care at a reasonable price obviously doesn't work - so we end up with insufficient supply and back-pressure on the hospitals.

Unfortunately, health and welfare have now been caught in a vice between expectation and affordability. The original concept of a health service to treat curable disease and to provide help has become a "right" where people demand access to services, regardless of cost. "Free at the point of use" has become "Free". Help has become dependency. But nobody sees a way to address these issues.

As we say at home "If I was you, I wouldn't start from here" ...... many sensible suggestions have been made about changes to the current service - and there are now many "competitor" services to compare against - but fear of creeping privatization and an inability to battle the entrenched objectors to change means little happens and very slowly - or, worse, things half-happen and we end up with the worst of both worlds..... think PFI, think dental care, think social provision.

As someone who has, luckily, been a nett contributor to the NHS for many years until recently, I do wonder whether some treatments offered actually fall within its original remit. As someone who has had major surgery and treatment by the NHS recently, I also wonder whether there are some aspects where I could have contributed or made decisions based on cost. In both cases I would like to see bills for treatment prepared and sent so that people are aware how much their own usage costs. At the same time, a billing system might actually give some confidence that NHS managers can actually do their jobs. However there are many other things which could be done, payment for GP services (as in most countries), insurance as an addition to NHS funding, not an alternative, etc., etc.. However, in the hands of politicians of all shades only sledgehammers are available - the whole of social care needs to be de-politicised.
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Re: NHS problems

Post by Constantine » Sun Jan 14, 2018 4:22 pm

The problems of the NHS, or indeed social care, basically come down to one thing, money. Or lack thereof.

And it's not because of 'cuts'. Budgets have been increased in real terms. It's because demand, as in an ageing population, is driving up the amount that needs to be spent.

There is really no point in pussyfooting about this. Taxes will have to be increased. As in putting the basic rate up to 25%. That will get you around £25 bn a year, Which is real money.

The problem is that no political party is prepared to put that stark truth before the electrorate,for fear that the voters will tell them to get stuffed.
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