Food bank box

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blythburgh
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Food bank box

Post by blythburgh » Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:53 am

At times I am amazed at what I find in food bank boxes. I do not check them out but cannot help noticing stuff when I put out donations in.

I have seen bags of crisps (surely they risk being smashed to bits and not the most important thing when you have no money to buy food) a jar of olives and on Monday a largish box of Thornton's chocolates.

We donate a pack of loo rolls and some packs of Tesco sanitary towels as we feel those are needed as desperately as food for some families. But never will I put in food that no family really needs to make a meal. Yes olives and chocolates are nice, as are biscuits but when money is so tight you have to use a food bank you need food that is nourishing and filling not treats.
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Constantine
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Re: Food bank box

Post by Constantine » Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:07 am

blythburgh wrote:... Yes olives and chocolates are nice, as are biscuits but when money is so tight you have to use a food bank you need food that is nourishing and filling not treats.
Olives are not nice.:)

But if money is so tight you have to use a food bank, having food that is nourishing is one thing, but a packet of chocolate digestives will make your day. Being really poor is a right downer. You need cheering up.

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Re: Food bank box

Post by macliam » Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:15 am

Constantine wrote:
blythburgh wrote:... Yes olives and chocolates are nice, as are biscuits but when money is so tight you have to use a food bank you need food that is nourishing and filling not treats.
Olives are not nice.:)

But if money is so tight you have to use a food bank, having food that is nourishing is one thing, but a packet of chocolate digestives will make your day. Being really poor is a right downer. You need cheering up.
Speak for yourself! SWMBO has 4x5 litre pots of olives in brine from our couple of trees - totally organic, small and black. They are delicious! However, if I was on the breadline I'd probably not be looking for supermarket olives.....

But agree with you about the biscuits - it's the difference between surviving and living ;)
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Re: Food bank box

Post by pabenny » Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:40 am

Constantine wrote:But if money is so tight you have to use a food bank, having food that is nourishing is one thing, but a packet of chocolate digestives will make your day. Being really poor is a right downer. You need cheering up.
Very much agree. The circumstances that result in people needing foodbanks are often dire - debt, relationship breakdown, benefits problems - or all of those. A boost to morale can be as important as filling the belly.
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blythburgh
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Re: Food bank box

Post by blythburgh » Wed Feb 21, 2018 12:13 pm

I can see your points. And at one point I was living on my own and eating little more than baked beans just so I could keep my car on the road as I needed it. And that is why we want to put stuff in the box each week. But will continue to put in essentials rather than treats.

But some Creme Eggs when Easter approaches or even some "normal" Easter eggs would be welcome to those who are forced to use the food bank. But please make them an addition to your usual donations as food it the most vital thing.

And yes there are many reasons for using a food bank. Sadly when you are on benefits or on a very low income from work a breakdown of car or washing machine etc can mean the difference between keeping your head above water and slipping under.

What sickens me is some of the people using the food bank are in work but on zero hours contracts who have had few hours work or been too sick for a day or two to actually work.

But my sister in law who has a good pension (and benefits) as a John Lewis Partner and a husband who has two good private pensions on top of their state pensions refuses to give to a food bank. She thinks people who use them do not really need help. Needless to say the husband had a good job with only 2 redundancies in his work life, and got a job very quickly after each time he was made redundant and very good redundancy money each time he lost his job. So they have never known what it is like to struggle. Although my sister in law had it tough as a child as the household income left little for treats but she has seemingly forgotten that.
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Re: Food bank box

Post by gle1975 » Thu Feb 22, 2018 10:25 am

Are food banks supposed to be for unwanted food? I buy some bits to put in there sometimes such as pasta etc. Would it better to give the money to the food bank company so they can buy in bulk?

Do they get waste food off the supermarkets? I worked in Marks and Spencers depot once and they threw away lots of food. If a pack of 12 jars of coffee or olive oil fell on the floor and one jar/bottle broke all of the pack went into the bin.
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blythburgh
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Re: Food bank box

Post by blythburgh » Thu Feb 22, 2018 11:54 am

gle1975 wrote:Are food banks supposed to be for unwanted food? I buy some bits to put in there sometimes such as pasta etc. Would it better to give the money to the food bank company so they can buy in bulk?

Do they get waste food off the supermarkets? I worked in Marks and Spencers depot once and they threw away lots of food. If a pack of 12 jars of coffee or olive oil fell on the floor and one jar/bottle broke all of the pack went into the bin.

Well I am hoping that M and S do not do that any more.

As I understand it at least some supermarkets are now giving food to charities that would have gone in the bin. Tesco give an extra amount on top of what the customers give. The figure 18% on top is in my head but I would not rely on that figure. The actual top up figure is 20% so worth donating in Tesco stores.

Food banks locally are not part of a national thing, the company that ran them lost a grant and had to stop doing the food bank side of its work.

From the local rag: After the closure of the East Suffolk Foodbank in October – which had drop-in centres across Lowestoft and Waveney – following “a lack of successful grant funding,” interim arrangements were put in place to ensure that foodbank services continued.

With emergency support provided through Access Community Trust, Salvation Army and the Waveney Foodbank, a longer term sustainable solution is being unveiled in conjunction with poverty charity, the Trussell Trust.

Lowestoft Community Church is working with the Trussell Trust to take on “the management and governance of the foodbank.”


And if you think the undeserving are getting the food etc then remember you have to get a voucher before you can go to a food bank. From the local food bank website:

f you need help from our foodbank there are a few simple steps to follow.

THE MOST IMPORTANT STEP IS TO GET A FOODBANK VOUCHER.
In order to provide the most appropriate help for the circumstances of your situation we work with local agencies. If they feel you are struggling to put food on the table, they will issue you with a foodbank voucher. The local agency can also provide long term support if needed to help address some of the issues behind the reasons for your crisis. Agencies we work with include: Citizens Advice, housing support officers, children’s centres, health visitors, social services and some local charities.

1. GET IN TOUCH WITH US.
If you call or email our foodbank we can talk through your situation and put you in touch with a relevant local agency.

2. ARRANGE A VISIT TO THE REFERRAL AGENCY.
They will discuss your situation and supply you with a foodbank voucher where appropriate.

3. BRING YOUR FOODBANK VOUCHER TO YOUR NEAREST FOODBANK CENTRE.
You can find a list of our local centres and opening times here. When you arrive, we’ll welcome you with a warm drink and our trained volunteers will chat with you about your situation. We’ll also discuss any dietary needs you may have and exchange your foodbank voucher for a parcel of three days of emergency food. We’ll also help to support you in any other ways that we can. Most of our foodbank centres offer a cafe style environment and our aim is to provide non-judgemental support at the point of crisis.

If you have any further questions our FAQ’s page may help, or feel free to give us a call.


Went to the website and you can donatel cash to them or goods or volunteer with them. And of course if you join a local Credit Union your money is safe (not sure if they give interest on your money) and that money helps fund lower cost loans to people in need. Yes, the interest rate if higher than I would pay if I took out a bank loan. But if you are in a situation where bank loans are out of the question then the interest rate is far, far lower then with pay day loan companies.
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Keep smiling because the light at the end of someone's tunnel may be you, Ron Cheneler

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