Word of the day

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Re: Word of the day

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Tue Jun 02, 2020 2:20 pm

Richard Frost wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:04 pm
Today's Word of the Day - http://www.wordthink.com/
Jun 2 2020

Avarice
Avarice n. Immoderate desire, greed for wealth: an unreasonably strong desire to obtain and keep money. “His life was consumed by ambition and avarice.”
I can't think who such a word would describe succinctly.
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Re: Word of the day

Post by Richard Frost » Thu Jun 04, 2020 10:59 am

THURSDAY, JUNE 04, 2020 - https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day/
caseous
[ key-see-uhs ]
adjective

of or like cheese.

WHAT IS THE ORIGIN OF CASEOUS?
The English adjective caseous derives from the Latin noun cāseus “cheese,” which in Latin comedy (Plautus), at least, is used as a term of endearment: molliculus cāseus “delicate cheese.” (Molliculus is a diminutive of the adjective mollis “soft.” Diminutives are characteristic of colloquial Latin, and therefore of comedy, and also exist in modern Romance languages, e.g., Italian orecchio “ear,” from auricula, a diminutive of auris “ear.”) The etymology of cāseus is unknown, but it may come from earlier, unrecorded kwātsos, meaning “something runny,” from the Proto-Indo-European root kwat- “to ferment; be, become, or make sour.” If that is so, cāseus may be related to Russian kvas “sour beer,” and Polish kwas “acid.” Caseous entered English in the mid-17th century.

HOW IS CASEOUS USED?
Second, eat these little caseous balloons immediately—like topical plays, they lose value every couple of minutes.

JONATHAN REYNOLDS, "SAY CHEESE BALLS," NEW YORK TIMES, SEPTEMBER 30, 2001
I have no doubt but that in the process of churning the whole milk there is a large amount of lactic acid formed, and a much higher temperature attained, than in the churning of cream; consequently, the separation of caseous matter must be more perfectly effected in the former than in the latter case.

CHARLES A. CAMERON, THE STOCK-FEEDER'S MANUAL: THE CHEMISTRY OF FOOD IN RELATION TO THE BREEDING AND FEEDING OF LIVE STOCK, 1868
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Re: Word of the day

Post by Richard Frost » Fri Jun 05, 2020 10:50 am

Word of the day - Bing

desultory
[ˈdɛs(ə)lt(ə)ri, ˈdɛz(ə)lt(ə)ri]

ADJECTIVE
lacking a plan, purpose, or enthusiasm.

"a few people were left, dancing in a desultory fashion"

synonyms:
casual · half-hearted · lukewarm · cursory · superficial · token · perfunctory · passing · incidental · sketchy · haphazard · random · aimless · rambling · erratic · unmethodical · unsystematic · automatic · unthinking · capricious · mechanical · offhand · chaotic · inconsistent · irregular · intermittent · occasional · sporadic · inconstant · fitful
antonyms:
keen · systematic · lasting
(of conversation or speech) going from one subject to another in a half-hearted way.
"the desultory conversation faded"
occurring randomly or occasionally.
"desultory passengers were appearing"
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Re: Word of the day

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Fri Jun 05, 2020 12:06 pm

Richard Frost wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 10:50 am
Word of the day - Bing

desultory
[ˈdɛs(ə)lt(ə)ri, ˈdɛz(ə)lt(ə)ri]

ADJECTIVE
lacking a plan, purpose, or enthusiasm.

"a few people were left, dancing in a desultory fashion"

synonyms:
casual · half-hearted · lukewarm · cursory · superficial · token · perfunctory · passing · incidental · sketchy · haphazard · random · aimless · rambling · erratic · unmethodical · unsystematic · automatic · unthinking · capricious · mechanical · offhand · chaotic · inconsistent · irregular · intermittent · occasional · sporadic · inconstant · fitful
antonyms:
keen · systematic · lasting
(of conversation or speech) going from one subject to another in a half-hearted way.
"the desultory conversation faded"
occurring randomly or occasionally.
"desultory passengers were appearing"
Watch the A-Team and you will understand that there is always a plan, purpose, and enthusiasm.
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Re: Word of the day

Post by Richard Frost » Fri Jun 05, 2020 12:51 pm

AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 12:06 pm
Watch the A-Team and you will understand that there is always a plan, purpose, and enthusiasm.
No that is the A Team having a plan, purpose, and enthusiasm.. Unsurprising given that it was a fictional Action TV series that was designed to entertain people with nothing better to do than be entertained and bearing no relationship to real life.

In short, you seek yet again to take the thread off topic.
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Re: Word of the day

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Fri Jun 05, 2020 2:28 pm

Richard Frost wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 12:51 pm
AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 12:06 pm
Watch the A-Team and you will understand that there is always a plan, purpose, and enthusiasm.
No that is the A Team having a plan, purpose, and enthusiasm.. Unsurprising given that it was a fictional Action TV series that was designed to entertain people with nothing better to do than be entertained and bearing no relationship to real life.

In short, you seek yet again to take the thread off topic.
Don't egg on that guy Richard. He would love to give me a second off-topic warning.

Imagine what the imutual forums would be without me.
Ignorance is bliss.
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Word of the day

Post by Richard Frost » Sat Jun 06, 2020 5:11 pm

Word of the day

SATURDAY, JUNE 06, 2020 https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day/
jury-rig
[ joo r-ee-rig ]
verb (used with object)

to assemble quickly or from whatever is at hand, especially for temporary use: to jury-rig stage lights using automobile headlights.

WHAT IS THE ORIGIN OF JURY-RIG?
Jury-rig, “to assemble quickly with whatever is at hand, improvise, especially for temporary use,” is of obscure origin, but probably originally a nautical term, based on another, earlier nautical term jury-mast, “a temporary mast on a sailing vessel replacing a damaged or destroyed mast,” first recorded in 1617. Jury-rig is close enough in meaning and sound to jerry- in jerry-build (and its derivatives jerry-builder and jerry-built) “to build or make in a haphazard, slovenly fashion,” and the confusion of those terms resulted in the hybrid verb jerry-rig, first recorded about 1960. (There are people in south Jersey and Philadelphia who pronounce ferry as furry and color as keller.) But jerry-build and jerry-rig always imply flimsiness and shoddiness; jury-rig implies improvisation. Jury-rig entered English in the second half of the 18th century.

HOW IS JURY-RIG USED?
She told the school custodian that her bike handlebars were all screwed up and that she needed some duct tape to jury–rig it until she got home.
JODI PICOULT, NINETEEN MINUTES, 2007

New problems arose all the time, and the engineers were forever improvising ways to jury-rig a component or bypass a system.
KEN FOLLETT, CODE TO ZERO, 2000
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Re: Word of the day

Post by Richard Frost » Sun Jun 07, 2020 1:49 pm

bumfuzzle https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bumfuzzle

Definition - confuse; perplex; fluster

History and Etymology for bumfuzzle
probably alteration of English dialect dumfoozle, probably alteration of English dumfound

Bumfuzzle has been in use since the middle of the 19th century, although it appears to be slouching towards obsolescence. We’re not certain where it comes from, although it is possible that it is descended from dumfound (which had variants such as dumfoozle and bumfoozle). If you want to claim that bumfuzzle is based on some meaning of bum compounded with fuzzle (an archaic word meaning “to intoxicate”) you certainly can. You'd almost certainly be wrong, but at least you’d have an entertaining etymology.

When he got to the stairs, another, a sister of the first kissist and huggist, did the thing over again. He was bumfuzzled, but supposed the matter would soon be explained; and it was. The girls had mistaken him for their uncle.
— The Weekly Caucasian (Lexington, MO), 6 Sept. 1873
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Re: Word of the day

Post by Richard Frost » Mon Jun 08, 2020 10:02 am

WORD OF THE DAY - MONDAY, JUNE 08, 2020 - https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day/
alligate
[ al-i-geyt ]
verb (used with object)

Obsolete.

to attach; bind.

WHAT IS THE ORIGIN OF ALLIGATE?
The rare verb alligate comes from Latin alligātus, the past participle of alligāre “to tie, tie up, tie together,” especially in the combination or mixture of elements of different qualities or values. Alligate entered English in the 16th century.

HOW IS ALLIGATE USED?
light weight of truth, spun out to cob-web tenuity, might be alligated with fancies and spangled with glittering fallacies, the whole bearing the name of homeopathy …

, "ARTICLE XII," AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DENTAL SCIENCE, VOL. 4, JULY 1854

We are not, dear sisters, called to go into the field of battle and expose our lives to the devouring sword; but we are alligated by every principle of religion and virtue to mourn the sins which render these calamities necessary …

MARY WEBB, "AN ADDRESS FROM THE BOSTON FEMALE SOCIETY FOR MISSIONARY PURPOSES TO FEMALES PROFESSING GODLINESS," MASSACHUSETTS BAPTIST MISSIONARY MAGAZINE, MARCH 1813
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Re: Word of the day

Post by macliam » Mon Jun 08, 2020 10:04 am

So, is someone who attaches or binds an Alligator? :eh:
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