Word of the day

Discussion about miscellaneous topics not covered by other forums
Richard Frost
Posts: 11151
Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2010 8:14 pm
Location: The Isle of Dreams
Has thanked: 2378 times
Been thanked: 5378 times
Contact:

Word of the day

Post by Richard Frost » Sun Jun 14, 2020 9:33 am

SUNDAY, JUNE 14, 2020 - https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day/
Samaritan
[ suh-mar-i-tn ]
noun

one who is compassionate and helpful to a person in distress.

WHAT IS THE ORIGIN OF SAMARITAN?
Samaritan as an adjective means “pertaining to Samaria or the Samaritans”; as a noun, it means “a native or inhabitant of Samaria.” Most commonly, however, Samaritan is short for Good Samaritan, after Jesus’ parable in Luke 10:30-37. Samaritan comes from the Late Latin adjective Samarītānus “Samaritan” (used as a noun in the masculine plural), from the Greek noun Samarī́tēs “a Samaritan,” a derivative of Samareía, the name of a city and region in Palestine. Greek Samareía comes from Aramaic Shamerayin, from Hebrew Shōmərôn, of uncertain meaning, but possibly from Shemer, the owner who sold Shōmərôn to Omri, king of Israel, in 1 Kings 16:24. Samaritan entered English before 1000.

HOW IS SAMARITAN USED?

That night, they slept in a good Samaritan‘s home, washed dirty laundry, and showered for the first time since leaving home. - LOURDES MEDRANO, "BORDER CRISIS FROM THE OTHER SIDE: ONE GUATEMALAN MOTHER'S JOURNEY," CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, OCTOBER 5, 2014

Kids want to counteract inequality, to be good samaritans and help the little guy. ALIA WONG, "THE PRESCHOOLER'S EMPATHY VOID," THE ATLANTIC, NOVEMBER 2, 2016
Thanked by: blythburgh

macliam
Posts: 8830
Joined: Thu Jul 18, 2013 12:26 pm
Location: By the Deben, Suffolk
Has thanked: 1384 times
Been thanked: 7123 times
Contact:

Re: Word of the day

Post by macliam » Sun Jun 14, 2020 9:53 am

... and of course in the Samaritans, that amazing charity aimed at providing support to those contemplating suicide.

I have a friend who has been a counsellor for years... very grounded and calm. I tried it for a couple of months and couldn't hack it - talking to someone who had self-harmed to the point of amputation was just too much to take when the best I could offer was a place on a waiting list for one-to-one help.

The NHS is great overall, but mental health cover is the poor relation. Without funded resource to back them up, counsellors are fighting a losing battle.
Just because I'm paranoid, it doesn't mean they're not out to get me

Richard Frost
Posts: 11151
Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2010 8:14 pm
Location: The Isle of Dreams
Has thanked: 2378 times
Been thanked: 5378 times
Contact:

Word of the day

Post by Richard Frost » Mon Jun 15, 2020 9:42 am

WORD OF THE DAY - https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day/
MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2020
dilly
[ dil-ee ]
noun

Informal.

something or someone regarded as remarkable, unusual, etc.: a dilly of a movie.

WHAT IS THE ORIGIN OF DILLY?
The noun and adjective dilly, like many slang terms, has an obscure etymology. One etymology is that dilly is an alteration of delightful or delicious; the suffix –y is either the native English adjective suffix –y (as in juicy), or the originally Scottish noun suffix –y (as in granny). Dilly was originally an Americanism, first appearing in print in the early 20th century.

HOW IS DILLY USED?
It would be a dilly of a painting. - SUSAN VREELAND, THE FOREST LOVER, 2004

The two big numbers, and they were dillies, were “La Toilette de la Cour” by Anthony Philip Heinrich, and Albert Gehring’s “The Soul of Chopin.” - HAROLD C. SCHONBERG, "TIDBITS OF FORGOTTEN MUSIC EVOKE AN AMERICAN PAST," NEW YORK TIMES, MAY 25, 1973
Thanked by: blythburgh

Richard Frost
Posts: 11151
Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2010 8:14 pm
Location: The Isle of Dreams
Has thanked: 2378 times
Been thanked: 5378 times
Contact:

Word of the day

Post by Richard Frost » Tue Jun 16, 2020 10:07 am

Word of the day - 16/6/20 - https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/divagate

divagate verb

di·​va·​gate | \ ˈdī-və-ˌgāt , ˈdi- \
divagated; divagating
Definition of divagate
intransitive verb

: to wander or stray from a course or subject : DIVERGE, DIGRESS

divagation \ ˌdī-​və-​ˈgā-​shən , ˌdi-​ \ noun

The Origin of Divagate
Divagate hasn't wandered far in meaning from its Latin ancestors. It descends from the verb "divagari," which comes from dis-, meaning "apart," and vagari, meaning "to wander." "Vagari" also gave us vagabond, meaning "a wanderer with no home," and "extravagant," an early, now archaic, sense of which was "wandering away." Latin vagari is also probably the source of our noun "vagary," which now usually means "whim or caprice" but originally meant "journey, excursion, or tour." Even the verb "stray" may have evolved from "vagari," by way of Vulgar Latin and Middle French. Today, "divagate" can suggest a wandering or straying that is literal (as in "the hikers divagated from the trail"), but it is more often used figuratively (as in "she tends to divagate from the subject").

First Known Use of divagate
1599, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for divagate
Late Latin divagatus, past participle of divagari, from Latin dis- + vagari to wander — more at VAGARY
Thanked by: blythburgh

blythburgh
Posts: 15512
Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2010 7:14 pm
Location: The Far East
Has thanked: 28886 times
Been thanked: 5633 times
Contact:

Re: Word of the day

Post by blythburgh » Tue Jun 16, 2020 11:14 am

I plea guilty to divagate at times
Thanked by: Richard Frost
Keep smiling because the light at the end of someone's tunnel may be you, Ron Cheneler

macliam
Posts: 8830
Joined: Thu Jul 18, 2013 12:26 pm
Location: By the Deben, Suffolk
Has thanked: 1384 times
Been thanked: 7123 times
Contact:

Re: Word of the day

Post by macliam » Tue Jun 16, 2020 12:35 pm

So, it's an alternative to Deviate, which is the accepted term expressing the same meaning.

Thousands of words exist, or have existed, without being in normal usage today ..... this is one.
Thanked by: Richard Frost, blythburgh
Just because I'm paranoid, it doesn't mean they're not out to get me

AAAlphaThunder
Posts: 25674
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2010 8:23 pm
Has thanked: 189 times
Been thanked: 3473 times
Contact:

Re: Word of the day

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Tue Jun 16, 2020 2:47 pm

macliam wrote:
Tue Jun 16, 2020 12:35 pm
So, it's an alternative to Deviate, which is the accepted term expressing the same meaning.

Thousands of words exist, or have existed, without being in normal usage today ..... this is one.
Surprising fact but to get by day-to-day with any given language you don't actually need to know that thousands of words, more like a few hundred words.
Thanked by: blythburgh
[Secretary] imutual Cashback Investment Club

Richard Frost
Posts: 11151
Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2010 8:14 pm
Location: The Isle of Dreams
Has thanked: 2378 times
Been thanked: 5378 times
Contact:

Word of the day

Post by Richard Frost » Wed Jun 17, 2020 9:15 am

myriad - https://www.bing.com/search?q=define+myriad

[ˈmɪrɪəd, ˈmɪrɪad]
NOUN

a countless or extremely great number of people or things.
"myriads of insects danced around the light above my head"

synonyms:
multitude · a large/great number/quantity · a lot · scores · quantities · mass · [More]
(chiefly in classical history) a unit of ten thousand.
"the army was organized on a decimal system, up to divisions of 10,000 or myriads"

ADJECTIVE
countless or extremely great in number.
"he gazed at the myriad lights of the city"

synonyms:
innumerable · countless · infinite · numberless · unlimited · untold · limitless · [More]
Thanked by: blythburgh

AAAlphaThunder
Posts: 25674
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2010 8:23 pm
Has thanked: 189 times
Been thanked: 3473 times
Contact:

Re: Word of the day

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Wed Jun 17, 2020 10:48 am

A day shall come to pass when imutual shall have a myriad of active members.
[Secretary] imutual Cashback Investment Club

Dream on
Posts: 592
Joined: Fri Nov 04, 2011 7:16 pm
Has thanked: 2611 times
Been thanked: 309 times
Contact:

Re: Word of the day

Post by Dream on » Wed Jun 17, 2020 10:53 am

AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 10:48 am
A day shall come to pass when imutual shall have a myriad of active members.
We all have our fantasies, i'm sure.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests