What can we celebrate today?

Discussion about miscellaneous topics not covered by other forums
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by kevinchess1 » Thu Jul 16, 2020 11:52 am

AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Thu Jul 16, 2020 10:38 am
[1439] Kissing was banned in England because of the Plague.

Crickey no kissing. What would Romeo have done?
Well, Seeing as the play what Willy wrote, is set 150ish years later, I doubt he'd be that bothered
Politically incorrect since 69

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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Thu Jul 16, 2020 11:57 am

William Shakespeare birthdate 23 Apr 1564. Aother example of the Thunderbogs spam.

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What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Fri Jul 17, 2020 10:12 am

17th July

NATIONAL PEACH ICE CREAM DAY
NATIONAL YELLOW PIG DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... y-july-17/
WORLD EMOJI DAY
NATIONAL LOTTERY DAY
NATIONAL TATTOO DAY

On This day in history.

924 The death of Edward the Elder, King of the Anglo-Saxons. He was largely ignored by modern historians until the 1990s, when historian Nick Higham described him as 'perhaps the most neglected of English kings'. Edward's reputation rose in the late twentieth century, and he is now seen as destroying the power of the Vikings in southern England, and laying the foundations for a south-centred united English kingdom.

1453 In the last battle of the Hundred Years' War ( the Battle of Castillon) the French, under Jean Bureau, defeated the English, under the Earl of Shrewsbury, who was killed in the battle.

1674 The birth of Isaac Watts, English hymn writer. He was a prolific and popular hymn writer and is credited with some 650 hymns. Many of his hymns remain in use today including Joy to the World, O God, Our Help in Ages Past and When I Survey the Wondrous Cross.

1717 King George I sailed down the River Thames for a concert, in a barge with 50 musicians. It was the premiere of Frideric Handel's Water Music which George I was said to have enjoyed so much that he made the exhausted musicians play the three suites three times over the course of the outing.

1761 The official opening of the Bridgewater canal, built to transport the Duke of Bridgewater's coal from his mine at Worsley, near Manchester.

1841 The first issue of the humorous magazine Punch was published in London. It ceased publication in 1992 but was re-launched in 1996.

1917 World War 1: The British Royal Family, in a proclamation issued by George V, adopted the name of the House of Windsor in place of their German family name of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha due to the anti-German sentiment at the time.

1918 The RMS Carpathia, the ship that rescued the 705 survivors from the RMS Titanic, was sunk off Ireland by the German SM U-55, with the loss of 5 lives.

1923 The birth of John Cooper. He developed the British Motor Corporation Mini Cooper, adored by rally racers and ordinary drivers.

1960 The Beatles began a three-month engagement at The Indra Club in Hamburg, Germany, their first appearance outside Britain.

1964 British speed pioneer Sir Donald Campbell set a new land speed world record of 403.10 mph in his car, Bluebird. In July 2014, to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the achievement, unseen family video footage of Donald Campbell breaking both the land and water speed records in 1964 was restored.

1974 An explosion in the Tower of London left one person dead and 41 injured. The incident happened without the coded warning typical of the IRA.

1981 The Humber Estuary Bridge was officially opened by the Queen. For 16 years after its construction it was the world's longest single-span structure.

1987 Former Guinness director Thomas Ward was ordered to repay £5.2m to the brewing giants after being found guilty of illegal practices during the takeover of drinks company Distillers Group the previous year.

1995 Robbie Williams left Take That, leaving them as a 'fab four'. The group had scored six UK No.1 singles with Robbie in the group.

2000 Tesco decided to revive imperial measures in its stores after shoppers' pressure.

2001 Michael Portillo was dropped from the Tory leadership contest after coming third in a final ballot of MPs.

2014 Retired Det. Sgt. Jack Tasker, a former detective with Lancashire Police said that three investigations into Cyril Smith sex abuse allegations were stopped, claiming that senior officers ordered him to hand over notes and warned he would be "in serious trouble" if he continued the investigation. Smith was MP for Rochdale from October 1972 – April 1992. After his death in 2010 numerous allegations of child sexual abuse emerged (including many made during his lifetime), leading the police to believe that Smith was a serial sex offender.

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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Fri Jul 17, 2020 10:59 am

[1923] The birth of John Cooper. He developed the British Motor Corporation Mini Cooper, adored by rally racers and ordinary drivers.

A true British legend is the Mini Cooper. Not the new one but the old classic Mini Cooper.
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What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:24 am

18 July

Nelson Mandela International Day (A/RES/64/13)
NATIONAL CAVIAR DAY
NATIONAL SOUR CANDY DAY
NATIONAL STRAWBERRY RHUBARB WINE DAY
TOSS AWAY THE “COULD HAVES”AND “SHOULD HAVES” DAY

On This Day in history - 18th July

1389 France and Britain agreed to the Truce of Leulinghem. It inaugurated a 13-year peace; the longest period of sustained peace during the Hundred Years' War.

1817 Jane Austen, English novelist of Pride and Prejudice died, aged 41 She was buried at Winchester Cathedral.

1848 William Gilbert Grace, cricketing legend, was born. Grace was important in the development of the sport and was universally known as W.G. He played first-class cricket for a record-equalling 44 seasons, from 1865 to 1908, during which he captained England, Gloucestershire County Cricket Club, the Gentlemen, MCC and the United South of England Eleven.

1872 Britain introduced the concept of voting by secret ballot.

1892 The death of Thomas Cook, founder of the travel agency that became the Thomas Cook Group in 2007. He organized, in 1861, the first publicly advertised railway excursion to a temperance meeting at Loughborough (11 miles away).

1901 The water supply was turned off in Manchester as a heat wave hit the U.K. with the temperature reaching 35 degrees Centigrade.

1920 The unveiling of the Cenotaph War memorial in Whitehall, London to commemorate the war dead. It was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and takes its name from the Greek words kenos and taphos meaning empty tomb.

1923 Under the Matrimonial Causes Bill, British women were given equal divorce rights with men.

1934 The official opening, by King George V, of the first Mersey Road Tunnel in Liverpool.

1950 Richard Branson, British entrepreneur, was born. According to the Forbes 2011 list of billionaires, Branson is the 4th richest citizen of the United Kingdom.

1957 The birth of Sir Nicholas Alexander Faldo (Nick Faldo), professional golfer who has won three Open Championships and three Masters. He was ranked the World's No. 1 on the Official World Golf Ranking for a total of 98 weeks.

1970 Radio 1 DJ Kenny Everett was sacked after he joked on air that the wife of the conservative transport minister Mary Peyton had 'crammed a fiver into the examiner's hand', when taking her driving test.

1975 Former British MP John Stonehouse was flown back from Australia to face charges relating to his attempt to falsify his own death.

1992 John Smith was elected leader of the Labour party, with Margaret Beckett as his deputy.

2000 Police confirmed that the body they had found in a West Sussex field the previous day was that of missing eight-year old Sarah Payne. Her murderer, Roy Whiting, was convicted in December 2001 and sentenced to life imprisonment.

2003 The body of government scientist Dr. David Kelly was found in woodland, in Oxfordshire. Dr. Kelly had been at the centre of a row between the British Government and the BBC about the use of intelligence reports in the run up to the war against Iraq.

2009 Henry Allingham, the world's oldest man and one of the last surviving World War I servicemen, died, aged 113.

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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Sat Jul 18, 2020 6:56 pm

[1950] Richard Branson, British entrepreneur, was born. According to the Forbes 2011 list of billionaires, Branson is the 4th richest citizen of the United Kingdom.

Virgin - didn't he do well.
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What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Sun Jul 19, 2020 9:58 am

19th July
NATIONAL ICE CREAM DAY
NATIONAL DAIQUIRI DAY

On This Day in history - 19th July

1333 Wars of Scottish Independence: The English won a decisive victory over the Scots at the Battle of Halidon Hill, near Berwick-upon-Tweed. In England the victory, the first for many years, brought a great boost to the morale of the nation. Bannockburn had finally been avenged.

1545 The Mary Rose, the pride of Henry VIII's battle fleet, sank in the Solent with the loss of 700 lives. (The ship was raised on 11th October 1982 to be taken to Portsmouth Dockyard where she is undergoing conservation in the Mary Rose Hall.

1553 Lady Jane Grey was replaced by Mary I as Queen of England after having the title for just nine days.

1832 The British Medical Association was founded, as the Provincial Medical and Surgical Association, by Sir Charles Hastings, at a meeting in the Board Room of the Worcester Infirmary.

1837 Isambard Kingdom Brunel's 236 ft steamship, the Great Western, was launched at Bristol. She was the first ocean-going craft with an iron hull or screw propeller and was also the largest vessel in the world. On the same day in 1843, Brunel's 'SS Great Britain', the first Atlantic liner built of iron, was also launched. She is now restored and can be viewed at the Great Western Dockyard in Bristol.

1918 The end of World War I approached as the German army began retreating across the Marne River in France.

1919 Following Peace Day celebrations marking the end of World War I, ex-servicemen, unhappy with unemployment and other grievances, rioted and burn down Luton Town Hall. During the riot people broke into Farmers Music Shop and dragged pianos into the streets for dancing and singing, including, ironically 'Keep the home fires burning'. The mayor at the time, Henry Impey was smuggled out of Luton never to return.

1941 Winston Churchill introduced his 'V for Victory" campaign which rapidly spread through Europe. The BBC took the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, which matched the dot-dot-dot-dash Morse code for the letter V, and played it before news bulletins.

1969 British rower John Fairfax arrived at Fort Lauderdale, Florida, after becoming the first person to row across the Atlantic alone. He had left the Canary Islands on January 20th in a 24’ rowing boat and after 180 days and 4000 miles he had finished his journey. Three years later, with his girl friend, he rowed the 8000 miles from San Francisco to the Hayman Islands off the Queensland Coast.

1970 The SS Great Britain was finally welcomed home, back to Great Western Dockyard in Bristol where she was built, exactly 127 years to the day after her launch in 1843. (Note - Since 1937 the SS Great Britain had lain, scuttled in the shallow waters of Sparrow Cove, close to Port William in the Falkland Islands).

1972 The Battle of Mirbat, arguably the finest moment in SAS history. The battle was fought in the Gulf state of Oman, with British troops supporting the Sultan of Oman. Just nine Special Forces soldiers overcame 300 Communist guerrillas, known as the Adoo.

1976 British fishermen urged the Foreign Secretary, Anthony Crosland, to secure a 50-mile fishing zone around the UK.

1986 English boxer Frank Bruno was beaten in a heavyweight world championship contender fight by American Tim Witherspoon.

199 MPs voted in favour of permanent televising of the House of Commons.

1997 The Irish Republican Army (IRA) restored its cease-fire (broken on 9 February 1996) in order to participate in talks on the future of Northern Ireland.

1999 An academic study revealed that four million children in Britain were living in poverty.

2001 Former Tory MP, Jeffrey Archer, was convicted of perjury and perverting the course of justice and sentenced to four years in prison.

2013Comic actor and writer Mel Smith died of a heart attack, aged 60. He was known for the sketch shows 'Alas Smith and Jones' and 'Not The Nine O'Clock News'. Smith formed a lasting partnership with co-performer Griff Rhys Jones with whom he set up the independent television company, Talkback Productions.

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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Sun Jul 19, 2020 6:45 pm

[1969] British rower John Fairfax arrived at Fort Lauderdale, Florida, after becoming the first person to row across the Atlantic alone. He had left the Canary Islands on January 20th in a 24’ rowing boat and after 180 days and 4000 miles he had finished his journey. Three years later, with his girl friend, he rowed the 8000 miles from San Francisco to the Hayman Islands off the Queensland Coast.

They make a great couple.
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Mon Jul 20, 2020 9:55 am

AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Sun Jul 19, 2020 6:45 pm
[1969] British rower John Fairfax arrived at Fort Lauderdale, Florida, after becoming the first person to row across the Atlantic alone. He had left the Canary Islands on January 20th in a 24’ rowing boat and after 180 days and 4000 miles he had finished his journey. Three years later, with his girl friend, he rowed the 8000 miles from San Francisco to the Hayman Islands off the Queensland Coast.

They make a great couple.
You know them well and are able to make that judgement?

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What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Mon Jul 20, 2020 10:02 am

2oth July

World Chess Day (A/RES/74/22)

NATIONAL GET OUT OF THE DOGHOUSE DAY
NATIONAL LOLLIPOP DAY
NATIONAL MOON DAY
NATIONAL PENNSYLVANIA DAY

On This Day in history - 20th July


1304 The fall of Stirling Castle in the Wars of Scottish Independence. King Edward I of England took the stronghold using the 'War Wolf', a type of catapult that used the energy of a raised counterweight to throw a projectile. Ten years later Stirling Castle was recaptured by the Scots, an event that was the immediate cause of the Battle of Bannockburn in which Edward Longshanks's son, Edward II, came with an army two or three times the Scottish numbers and lost.

1685 A fortnight after the Battle of Sedgemoor, Lady Alice Lisle sheltered two supporters of Monmouth's defeated army at her home, Moyles Court in Hampshire. In the morning the men were arrested; she was charged with harbouring traitors and was subsequently executed.

1807 Round-arm (over-arm) bowling was introduced to English cricket by John Willes in the Kent v England match at Fenenden Heath.

1837 London’s first railway station opened, in Euston Grove. The new Euston station was described as ‘mightier than the pyramids of Egypt’.

1871 The English Football Association Challenge Cup Competition was formed, to become better known as the FA Cup. The first final saw the Wanderers beat the Royal Engineers by one goal to nil, watched by a crowd of 2,000.

1885 The Football Association legalised professionalism in football under pressure from the British Football Association.

1889 John Reith, Scottish engineer and first director general of the BBC, was born.

1938 Diana Rigg, English actress, was born. She is probably best known for her portrayals of Emma Peel in The Avengers and Countess Teresa di Vicenzo in the 1969 James Bond film On Her Majesty's Secret Service.

1943 The birth of the actress Wendy Richard. She played Miss Brahms in the BBC's Are You Being Served? and Pauline Fowler in EastEnders.

1944 World War II: Adolf Hitler escaped death after a third attempt on his life when a bomb exploded in Rastenberg.

1968 During a BBC radio interview, actress Jane Asher announced that her engagement to Beatle Paul McCartney was off. He was not the first to find out!

1982 An IRA terrorist bomb in Hyde Park, London, killed 3 members of the Blues and Royals during the Changing of the Guard ceremony. Two hours later 8 bandsmen were killed by an IRA bomb planted at the bandstand in Regent's Park.

1990 An IRA bomb blew a 10-foot hole in the London Stock Exchange.

2000 Families of the victims of serial killer GP Harold Shipman won their High Court battle for an open inquiry into how their loved ones died.

2002 Charles Kennedy, former Leader of the Liberal Democrats, and his fiancee Sarah Gurling, were married in the House of Commons chapel.

2003 The BBC confirmed that weapons expert Dr David Kelly, found dead two days earlier, was the source for reports that the government had 'sexed up' an Iraq dossier.

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