What can we celebrate today?

Discussion about miscellaneous topics not covered by other forums
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Mon Jul 27, 2020 8:24 pm

[1814] The chief engineer at the Killingworth colliery, George Stephenson, unveiled Blücher, his steam powered locomotive that could haul eight carriages loaded with 30 tons of coal at the break-neck speed of 4 mph. Stephenson was born at a house at Wylam, Northumberland which was shared with three other families.

A invention that changed the world.
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What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Tue Jul 28, 2020 9:53 am

28th July

World Hepatitis Day [WHO]
BUFFALO SOLDIERS DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/buffalo ... y-july-28/
NATIONAL MILK CHOCOLATE DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... y-july-28/
NATIONAL WATERPARK DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... y-july-28/

On This Day in history - 28th July

1540 Thomas Cromwell, Chancellor to Henry VIII and his chief minister, was executed. He was beheaded on Tower Hill for promoting the king's failed marriage to Anne of Cleves. Henry also married Catherine Howard (his 5th wife) on the same day.

1586 Thomas Harriot was credited with bringing the first potato to Britain, (from Colombia) ahead of Sir Walter Raleigh.

1857 The birth of Ballington Booth, an Officer in The Salvation Army and a co-founder of Volunteers of America. He was born in Brighouse, Yorkshire and was the second child of William and Catherine Booth, founders of The Salvation Army.

1858 Fingerprints were first used as a means of identification by William Herschel, who later established a fingerprint register.

1865 A crowd of 100,000 watched the last public execution in Scotland when Dr. Edward Pritchard was hanged for poisoning his wife and mother-in-law.

1866 Beatrix Potter, English author and illustrator was born. She was inspired to write her story 'The Tailor of Gloucester' after visiting the tailor's shop at 9, College Court, Gloucester. When she died in 1943 she left her house to the National Trust, conditionally that it be kept exactly as she left it.

1914 Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia, exactly one month after Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie had been shot dead by a Bosnian Serb nationalist. Europe went from peaceful prosperity to the start of a world war that would bring down four empires and cost millions of lives, ranking it among the deadliest conflicts in human history.

1935 The birth of Simon Dee, pirate radio disc jockey for Radio Caroline and later television interviewer and BBC radio disc jockey. He hosted a twice-weekly BBC TV chat show, Dee Time in the late 1960s. He was sacked by London Weekend Television in 1970 and his career never recovered. He died in August 2009.

1943 The worst British bombing raid on Hamburg so far during World War II virtually set the city on fire. In just 43 minutes, 2,326 tons of bombs killed 42,000 German civilians.

1948 The Metropolitan Police Flying Squad foiled a bullion robbery in what became known as the 'Battle of London Airport' an operation that brought them to national prominence. The name Flying Squad was coined in 1920 by a Daily Mail journalist called Crook!

1959 Postcodes were introduced in Britain.

1972 Thousands of British dockers began an official strike to safeguard jobs.

1987 23 year old British golfer Laura Davis won the U.S. Women's Open, becoming the first British woman ever to win the event.

1988 The MP for Yeovil, Paddy Ashdown, was elected the first leader of the new Social and Liberal Democrat Party.

2005 The IRA formally ordered an end to its armed campaign and said it would pursue exclusively peaceful means.

2008 A huge fire destroyed the historic Grand Pier at Weston-super-Mare. It first opened in 1904 and suffered fire damage in 1930 that led to its closure for 3 years. Following the 2008 fire, which completely destroyed the pavilion, the pier was rebuilt at a cost of £39 million and reopened on 23rd October 2010.
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by kevinchess1 » Tue Jul 28, 2020 10:08 am

And not forgetting a Senior member of the admin team has a birthday today

HAPPY BIRTHDAY :thumbup:
Politically incorrect since 69

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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Tue Jul 28, 2020 4:39 pm

kevinchess1 wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 10:08 am
And not forgetting a Senior member of the admin team has a birthday today

HAPPY BIRTHDAY :thumbup:
Happy Birthday mystery person.
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What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Wed Jul 29, 2020 9:50 am

29th July
NATIONAL CHICKEN WING DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... y-july-29/
NATIONAL LASAGNA DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... y-july-29/
NATIONAL LIPSTICK DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/national-lipstick-day/

On This Day in history - 29th July

1565 Mary, Queen of Scots married her cousin Lord Darnley (Henry Stuart) in the Old Abbey Chapel at Holyrood, Edinburgh, thus alienating Scottish protestants and England because Darnley was a Catholic heir to the throne.

1567 James VI was crowned King of Scotland at Stirling.

1588 The Spanish Armada was sighted off the coast of Cornwall. The English fleet under the command of Charles Howard and Francis Drake set sail from Plymouth, to establish the birth of British naval supremacy.

1833 The death of William Wilberforce, English campaigner for the abolition of the slave trade in the British Empire. He died a month before the Slavery Abolition Act was passed. The Wilberforce Monument is in Kingston upon Hull. His birthplace is now a museum.

1848 The Tipperary Revolt took place in the village of Ballingarry, County Tipperary, in protest at British rule. After being chased by a force of Young Irelanders and their supporters, an Irish Constabulary unit raided a house and took those inside as hostages. A gunfight lasting for several hours followed, but the rebels fled after a large group of police reinforcements arrived.

1913 The birth of Jo Grimond, British politician and Liberal party leader.

1930 The airship R100 began its first passenger-carrying flight from England to Canada.

1938 Dennis the Menace first appeared in the 'Beano' comic

1948 King George VI opened the 14th Olympic Games in London - the first time the Games had been held in 12 years, due to World War II.

1964 The Brook Advisory Clinic opened to give family planning advice to unmarried couples.

1970 John Barbirolli, English conductor died.

1976 Fire destroyed the famous pierhead at the end of the world's longest pier, in Southend, on England's south-east coast.

1981 The Prince of Wales married Lady Diana Spencer at London's St Paul's Cathedral. The televised ceremony was watched by over 700 million viewers around the world.

1993 Charges were dropped against two youths accused of murdering black teenager Stephen Lawrence.

2001 A victim support group condemned a reported £11,000 compensation offer to the parents of murdered seven-year-old Sarah Payne as 'derisory'.

2010 A luxury car valued at £1.2m was clamped outside Harrods in central London after being illegally parked. The Koenigsegg CCXR (one of only six ever made) was released for £70 as the parking fine was paid within 14 days.

2014 Clifford Hartland, aged 101, a Second World War prisoner camp survivor and his wife Marjorie, aged 97, died within hours of each other on their 76th wedding anniversary.

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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Wed Jul 29, 2020 10:19 am

[1981] The Prince of Wales married Lady Diana Spencer at London's St Paul's Cathedral. The televised ceremony was watched by over 700 million viewers around the world.

AKA Princess Diana.
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Wed Jul 29, 2020 11:45 am

AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 10:19 am
[1981] The Prince of Wales married Lady Diana Spencer at London's St Paul's Cathedral. The televised ceremony was watched by over 700 million viewers around the world.

AKA Princess Diana.
Wrong he did not marry Princess Diana. She became a Princess at the time of the marriage.

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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Wed Jul 29, 2020 2:10 pm

Richard Frost wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 11:45 am
AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 10:19 am
[1981] The Prince of Wales married Lady Diana Spencer at London's St Paul's Cathedral. The televised ceremony was watched by over 700 million viewers around the world.

AKA Princess Diana.
Wrong he did not marry Princess Diana. She became a Princess at the time of the marriage.
My misunderstanding. I apologise.

You are right.
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What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Thu Jul 30, 2020 10:19 am

World Day Against Trafficking in Persons - https://www.un.org/en/observances/end-h ... icking-day
NATIONAL CHILI DOG DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... ay-in-july
NATIONAL INTERN DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... -in-july-2
NATIONAL CHEESECAKE DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... ay-july-30
NATIONAL FATHER-IN-LAW-DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... ay-july-30
NATIONAL WHISTLEBLOWER DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... ay-july-30

On This Day in history - 30th July

1718 William Penn, English Quaker leader and founder of the American colony of Pennsylvania died.

1746 The death of Francis Towneley, English Jacobite who was executed for his role in the rebellion of 1745. His head was placed on a pike on Temple Bar, London but was secretly removed and has since been in possession of the Towneley family. The skull is now preserved in the chapel at Towneley Hall. The chapel's early 16th Century altarpiece is a magnificent example of Flemish craftsmanship.

1818 Emily Brontë, English novelist and author of Wuthering Heights was born in Thornton, West Yorkshire. Emily was the third eldest of the four surviving Brontë siblings, between the youngest Anne and her brother Branwell. She published under the pen name Ellis Bell. The Brontës' later home was the Haworth Parsonage, in West Yorkshire.

1898 The birth of Henry Moore, English sculptor and artist. He was best known for his semi-abstract monumental bronze sculptures which are located around the world as public works of art. His forms are generally pierced or contain hollow spaces. Many interpreters liken the undulating form of his reclining figures to the landscape and hills of his birthplace, Yorkshire.

1900 London Underground's Central Line was opened by the Prince of Wales, with a two pence (tuppence) fare for all destinations.

1935 'Penguin' paperback books, founded by Allen Lane, went on sale in Britain.

1940 Sir Clive Sinclair, inventor and pioneer of the first home computers (Sinclair ZX81 and Spectrum) was born. In 2010 Sinclair stated that he did not use computers himself, and preferred using the telephone to email. In 1983, Sinclair formed Sinclair Vehicles and released the Sinclair C5, a battery electric vehicle that proved to be a commercial failure.

1948 The world's first radar station was opened, to assist shipping at the port of Liverpool.

1958 Daley Thompson, British athlete was born. He won the decathlon gold medal at the Olympic Games in 1980 and 1984, and broke the world record for the event four times. With four world records, two Olympic gold medals, three Commonwealth titles, and wins in the World and European Championships, Thompson is considered by many to be the greatest decathlete of all time.

1963 Kim Philby, British intelligence officer from 1940 and Soviet agent from 1933, fled to the USSR.

1966 England won the Football World Cup in London, beating West Germany 4 - 2. This was England's first (and only) win since the tournament began in 1930. England forward Geoff Hurst became the only man to score a hat-trick in a world cup final.

1968The Beatles closed the Apple Boutique, and gave clothes away for free to passers-by.

1973 British victims of the drug Thalidomide were awarded £20 million compensation as their 11 year case against the Distillers company ended in victory.

1991 Italian tenor Pavarotti celebrated 30 years in opera with a huge, free concert in Hyde Park.

2000 The News of the World came under mounting pressure to end its 'name and shame' campaign against paedophiles.

2006 The world's longest running music show Top of the Pops was broadcast for the last time on BBC Two. The show had aired for 42 years. 2213 episodes were screened, the first being broadcast on New Year's Day 1964. Disc Jockey Jimmy Savile (who died on October 29th 2011) was the presenter of both the first and last shows. In October 2012 numerous allegations were made that Savile had sexually abused hundreds of young people, stretching from 1955 to 2009. In the aftermath, his gravestone at Scarborough was removed at the request of Savile's family and plaques and statues of him in other locations were removed to prevent further defacement.

2014 A large part of the 144-year-old Grade II listed pier at Eastbourne's seafront was 'reduced to a mangled wreck' after a huge blaze that is believed to have started in wall panelling. In the aftermath, Prime Minister David Cameron and Chancellor George Osborne pledged up to £2 million to help Eastbourne's tourism industry recover from the pier's loss.
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Thu Jul 30, 2020 5:19 pm

[1966] England won the Football World Cup in London, beating West Germany 4 - 2. This was England's first (and only) win since the tournament began in 1930. England forward Geoff Hurst became the only man to score a hat-trick in a world cup final.

It was a great game.
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