What can we celebrate today?

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Richard Frost
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Wed Aug 05, 2020 9:43 am

August 5, 2020 – National Oyster Day | National Work Like a Dog Day

Do You Love What You Do? Maybe It's Time to Take a Cue From Your Dog. Welcome to August 5th, 2020 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate a favorite shellfish and working like a dog. The Walrus and the Carpenter walked on a mile or so, and then they rested on a rock conveniently low: and all the little Oysters stood and waited in a row. “The time has come,” the Walrus said, “To talk of many things: Of shoes and ships and sealing wax--of cabbages -- and kings-- and why the sea is boiling hot and whether pigs have wings. You know why I’m reciting from Alice in Wonderland? Because on National Oyster Day I know you would rather listen to poetry than to think about eating an oyster! If the phrase “working like a dog” sounds like some kind of torture that leaves you panting with your tongue out, consider the point of view of a working dog. Historically, most dogs were bred for specific jobs. And some of these jobs may surprise you. The ancestors of the Yorkshire Terrier once worked in mines to kill rats and mice, Dachshunds hunted badgers, and even Queen Elizabeth’s favorite breed the Corgi, once had an important job. They would bite the heels of any cows that tried to stray from the herd, and their short little legs came in handy when avoiding the kick of an angry cow. Today’s working dogs are some real K9 heroes. On National Work Like A Dog Day, consider the pride of your favorite pups and put some pep in your step for your own job.

On This Day in history - 5th August

642 The Battle of Maserfield (now widely identified as Oswestry), between the Anglo-Saxon kings Oswald of Northumbria and Penda of Mercia. The battle ended in Oswald's defeat, death, and dismemberment.

910 The last major Viking army to raid England was defeated at the Battle of Tettenhall by the allied forces of Mercia and Wessex, led by King Edward and Earl Aethelred.

1100 Henry I was crowned King of England in Westminster Abbey.

1305 Sir William Wallace, Scottish hero and champion of Scottish independence who beat Edward I at the battle of Stirling Bridge, was captured by the English and later executed as a traitor.

1583 English soldier and navigator Sir Humphrey Gilbert (half-brother of Sir Walter Raleigh) established the first English colony in North America, at what is now St John's, Newfoundland and claimed it for Elizabeth I.

1620 The Mayflower departed from Southampton on its first attempt to reach North America but the sister ship, the Speedwell developed a leak. It had to be refitted at Dartmouth and, after further leaks (or possibly sabotage) the Mayflower made the 60 day crossing alone.

1729 The death of Thomas Newcomen. Newcomen created the first practical steam engine for pumping water from tin mines. Prior to his invention, flooding was a major problem, thus limiting the depth at which the mineral could be mined. The Newcomen engine at Elsecar in South Yorkshire was built in 1795 to extract water from the local colliery. It is the only one of its kind in the world to remain in its original location.

1792 The death of Lord Frederick North, British Prime Minister whose indecisive leadership led to the loss of the American colonies.

1816 Francis Ronalds built the first working electric telegraph in his garden on Hammersmith's Upper Mall. He offered his new invention to the Government, who dismissed it as being 'wholly unnecessary'. At this time the government was relying on a visual system (the semaphore) and it took a further 20 years for the electric telegraph to be commercialised.

1858 The first transatlantic cable was officially opened, with Queen Victoria sending a telegraphic message to US President James Buchanan.

1901 Britain's first cinema, the Mohawk, opened in Islington, north London. Films were accompanied by the 16-piece Fonobian Orchestra. At the height of their popularity in the 1940s, cinemas in Britain had average weekly attendances of 30 million.

1925 The political party Plaid Cymru was formed with the aim of disseminating knowledge of the Welsh language which was, at the time, in danger of dying out.

1963 A Nuclear Test Ban Treaty was signed in Moscow by Russia, the United States and Britain. Under the treaty, nuclear tests in the Earth's atmosphere, in space or under the sea were outlawed.

1975 Forestry Commission officials announced that Dutch elm disease, which had attacked more than three million trees in Britain, was spreading.

1976 The clock overlooking the Houses of Parliament stopped for the first time in 117 years.

1983 Twenty two members of the IRA were jailed for a total of more than 4,000 years following Northern Ireland's biggest-ever terrorist trial.

1984 The death of Richard Burton, Welsh actor, aged 58. Born at Pontrhydyfen, the Richard Burton sculpture is on the Richard Burton Trail in the Afan Forest Park in Neath - Port Talbot

1986 Princess Anne rode Gulfland to win the 3.45 at Redcar; her first victory as a jockey.
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What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Thu Aug 06, 2020 8:10 am

6th August

NATIONAL IPA DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... ay-august/
NATIONAL FRESH BREATH DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... -august-6/
NATIONAL ROOT BEER FLOAT DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... -august-6/
NATIONAL WIGGLE YOUR TOES DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... -august-6/

On This Day in history - 6th August

1504 Matthew Parker, Archbishop of Canterbury was born. He had an extremely long nose and was extremely inquisitive, hence the expression 'Nosy Parker'.

1623 Anne Hathaway, wife of William Shakespeare died. Anne Hathaway's Cottage is at Shottery, one mile west of Stratford upon Avon.

1809 Alfred Tennyson, English poet was born. He is the second most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, (after Shakespeare). Tennyson wrote a number of phrases that have become commonplaces of the English language, including "Better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all", and "Theirs not to reason why, theirs but to do and die".

1844 The first UK press telegram was sent, to The Times, announcing the birth of Prince Alfred to Queen Victoria.

1880 In a remarkable race at the Astley Stakes in Lewes, East Sussex, 5 of the 9 horses passed the winning post virtually simultaneously. The judge declared a triple dead heat for first place, with a double dead heat for fourth.

1881 Sir Alexander Fleming, scientist, Scottish bacteriologist and discoverer of penicillin was born at Lochfield Farm, Darvel in Ayrshire. His 'bacteria killer' discovery changed the world of modern medicine and has saved millions of people around the world.

1889 The Savoy Hotel in London was opened.

1914 World War I: The first Battle of the Atlantic took place On This Day. Two days after war had been declared on Germany over their invasion of Belgium, ten German U-boats left their base in Helgoland to attack Royal Navy warships in the North Sea.

1922 The birth of Sir Freddie Laker, British airline entrepreneur, best known for founding Laker Airways in 1966. He was one of the first airline owners to adopt the 'no-frills' airline business model.

1934 Chris Bonington, British mountaineer was born. His career included nineteen expeditions to the Himalayas, including four to Mount Everest and the first ascent of the south face of Annapurna, in Nepal.

1949 The 'acid bath murderer' John Haigh was executed. He was convicted of the murders of six people, although he claimed to have killed a total of nine, dissolving their bodies in concentrated sulphuric acid before forging papers in order to sell their possessions and collect substantial sums of money.

1962 Jamaica became independent, after being a British colony for 300 years.

1971Chay Blyth became the first to sail the world solo, non-stop, in the "wrong" direction i.e. east to west - against the prevailing winds and currents. His journey took 292 days.

1976 The government passed the Drought Act to combat the continued UK drought.

1987 SDP leader Dr David Owen resigned after members of his party voted to merge with the Liberals.

1990 Gulf War: The United Nations Security Council ordered a global trade embargo against Iraq in response to Iraq's invasion of Kuwait.

2009 The funeral service took place at Wells Cathedral for Britain's last World War I veteran Harry Patch, aged 111. A memorial to him is on Cathedral Green at Wells Cathedral.

2012 Pioneering astronomer and physicist Sir Bernard Lovell, the founder of University of Manchester's Jodrell Bank Observatory died, aged 98. The main telescope at Jodrell Bank is known as the Lovell Telescope.
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Thu Aug 06, 2020 4:18 pm

[1901] Britain's first cinema, the Mohawk, opened in Islington, north London. Films were accompanied by the 16-piece Fonobian Orchestra. At the height of their popularity in the 1940s, cinemas in Britain had average weekly attendances of 30 million.

A new and novel form of entertainment. Going to the cinema has morphed into an "experience". It's not just about the film anymore.
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Thu Aug 06, 2020 4:22 pm

[1881] Sir Alexander Fleming, scientist, Scottish bacteriologist and discoverer of penicillin was born at Lochfield Farm, Darvel in Ayrshire. His 'bacteria killer' discovery changed the world of modern medicine and has saved millions of people around the world.

Penicillin revolutionised medicine.
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What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Fri Aug 07, 2020 9:51 am

7th August

INTERNATIONAL BEER DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/interna ... in-august/
NATIONAL WATER BALLOON DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... in-august/ I remember playing this as a child, occasionally using condoms instead of balloons

On This Day in history - 7th August

1613 The death of Sir Thomas Fleming, the English judge in the trial of Guy Fawkes following the Gunpowder Plot.

1657 The death of Robert Blake, British naval commander who captured the Spanish treasure fleet off Santa Cruz.

1711 The first race meeting was held at Ascot, established by Queen Anne, thus giving them the status of 'Royal Ascot'.

1789 The death of William Edwards, a Welsh Methodist minister who also practised as a stonemason, architect and bridge engineer. His most famous creation was the Old Bridge at Pontypridd. The contract included a 'guarantee' clause, and Edwards actually constructed four successive bridges at the same site, with only the last surviving the torrential waters of the River Taff. His final version - a scheduled ancient monument, Grade I listed) was the largest single-span bridge in the world when it was completed (1756), exceeding the previous largest, the Rialto Bridge in Venice, by some 42 feet.

1840 The employment of climbing boys as chimney sweeps was prohibited by an Act of Parliament.

1879 The opening of the 'Poor Man's Palace' in Openshaw, Manchester, a Salvation Army Citadel specifically for soldiers in the area.

1913 In Britain's first aviation tragedy, US airman 'Colonel' Samuel Cody was killed when his aircraft crashed at Farnborough.

1925 Britain introduced the Daylight Saving Act - bringing in British summer time so the nation changed clocks by one hour twice a year.

1926 The first British motor racing Grand Prix was staged at Brooklands; 110 laps of the track for a total distance of 287 miles. The winner was Robert Senechal in just over 4 hours, at an average speed of almost 72 miles an hour.

1958 The Litter Act came into force in London as part of the Keep Britain Tidy campaign. Offenders could be fined up to £10 for dropping litter. In the first year nearly 1000 were prosecuted.

1961 The birth of Brian Conley, English comedian, television presenter, singer and actor. At the peak of his television career, he was the highest-paid male television personality in the UK.

1972 Ugandan leader, Idi Amin ordered 60,000 Asians, mostly British Passport Holders, to leave the country within 90 days or face the consequences. Most were expected to move to the UK.

1993 The public got its first glimpse inside Buckingham Palace as people were given the opportunity to tour the London home of Queen Elizabeth II. Proceeds from ticket sales were earmarked to help repair fire damage at Windsor Castle.

1995 British athlete Jonathan Edwards twice broke his own world triple jump record, becoming the first man to clear 18 metres - whilst winning the gold medal in the World Athletics Championships in Gothenburg.

2001 The government bought and re-nationalised a private hospital for the first time. The Department of Health paid £27m for the luxury private Heart Hospital just off Harley Street in central London.

2002 The Queen held the first ever garden party at Balmoral Castle in Scotland to end her Jubilee Year. 3000 people were invited to attend.

2011 Rioting began in Tottenham, during which residents attacked people, set fire to shops, and looted the neighbourhood in protest against the shooting of local man Mark Duggan by police. The rioting continued for several days and spread to other major cities, as a sign of unrest. Authorities believed the riots were organized through the use of social media such as Facebook and Twitter. A total of 3,443 crimes across London alone were linked to the disorder and damage to property was estimated at £200 million.

2012 Fifty year old Jessica Harper, former head of fraud and security at Lloyds Bank admitted carrying out a £2.4m fraud over a period of 4 years.
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Fri Aug 07, 2020 2:46 pm

[1993] The public got its first glimpse inside Buckingham Palace as people were given the opportunity to tour the London home of Queen Elizabeth II. Proceeds from ticket sales were earmarked to help repair fire damage at Windsor Castle.

Me and my girlfriend went for a day out there. Only one word for it "WOW".
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by kevinchess1 » Fri Aug 07, 2020 3:30 pm

AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Fri Aug 07, 2020 2:46 pm
[1993] The public got its first glimpse inside Buckingham Palace as people were given the opportunity to tour the London home of Queen Elizabeth II. Proceeds from ticket sales were earmarked to help repair fire damage at Windsor Castle.

Me and my girlfriend went for a day out there. Only one word for it "WOW".
I also thought ‘Wow!’ When I read you had a girlfriend.
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Fri Aug 07, 2020 7:25 pm

kevinchess1 wrote:
Fri Aug 07, 2020 3:30 pm
AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Fri Aug 07, 2020 2:46 pm
[1993] The public got its first glimpse inside Buckingham Palace as people were given the opportunity to tour the London home of Queen Elizabeth II. Proceeds from ticket sales were earmarked to help repair fire damage at Windsor Castle.

Me and my girlfriend went for a day out there. Only one word for it "WOW".
I also thought ‘Wow!’ When I read you had a girlfriend.
I have a wife and a several girlfriends.

You are confusing me with macliam it's axiomatic that he is privileged, middle-aged and single.
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by blythburgh » Sat Aug 08, 2020 7:42 am

kevinchess1 wrote:
Fri Aug 07, 2020 3:30 pm
AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Fri Aug 07, 2020 2:46 pm
[1993] The public got its first glimpse inside Buckingham Palace as people were given the opportunity to tour the London home of Queen Elizabeth II. Proceeds from ticket sales were earmarked to help repair fire damage at Windsor Castle.

Me and my girlfriend went for a day out there. Only one word for it "WOW".
I also thought ‘Wow!’ When I read you had a girlfriend.
No, macliam is married and as he loves and respects his wife he has no girlfriends
Keep smiling because the light at the end of someone's tunnel may be you, Ron Cheneler

Richard Frost
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Sat Aug 08, 2020 8:12 am

AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Fri Aug 07, 2020 7:25 pm
kevinchess1 wrote:
Fri Aug 07, 2020 3:30 pm
AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Fri Aug 07, 2020 2:46 pm
[1993] The public got its first glimpse inside Buckingham Palace as people were given the opportunity to tour the London home of Queen Elizabeth II. Proceeds from ticket sales were earmarked to help repair fire damage at Windsor Castle.

Me and my girlfriend went for a day out there. Only one word for it "WOW".
I also thought ‘Wow!’ When I read you had a girlfriend.
I have a wife and a several girlfriends.

You are confusing me with macliam it's axiomatic that he is privileged, middle-aged and single.
It is certainly not axiomatic. You neither know or can see him. Like all of your other posts you just write garbage.

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