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Richard Frost
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Tue Jul 20 2021 10:53am

20th July 2021

World Chess Day
Today, the International Chess Federation commemorates World Chess Day, which was created in 1924 by the Federation Internationale des Echecs (FIDES). World Chess Day encourages more people to play and enjoy the game.

Moon Day
Every year, Moon Day is celebrated on July 20. This day commemorates the day humans first walked on the moon in the year 1969. The first step of mankind on the moon was reported by NASA to be the single greatest technological achievement of all time. On July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 carried the first humans to the moon.

World Jump Day
World Jump Day is observed on July 20 of every year. World Jump Day is exactly celebrated at 11:39.13 GMT, during which millions of people from the Western Hemisphere jump simultaneously. It is believed that by doing the coordinating jump, the earth would be moved from its orbit into a new one, and would stop global warming.

Space Exploration Day
Space Exploration Day commemorates the July 20th anniversary of man’s first historic landing and walk on the surface of another celestial body. What had once been a topic for science fiction stories, had become an awe inspiring reality. Sending astronauts to the Moon, increased mankind’s sense of dignity and self worth. On July 20, 1969, there was peace in Viet Nam. The New York City crime rate dropped dramatically. The brotherhood of mankind shared in this symbol for peace and progress in the world. Where the conflicts in the world brought out mankind’s destructive tendencies; sending astronauts to the Moon revealed mankind’s creative nature. The Apollo 11 astronauts came in peace for all mankind.
https://space.nss.org/space-exploration-day/

Lollipop Day
Without a doubt, Lollipop Day is a day that children of all ages can celebrate. We’re looking at you, grandparents — relive some childhood memories! Some people call lollipops suckers but they go by other names as well — lolly, or sticky pop. They come in many flavours but mostly fruit flavours for licking or biting.

A Selection of Birthdays

1600 Simon Ives, English court composer (d. 1662)
1709 James Harris, English philosopher, born in Salisbury (d. 1780)
1726 William Jones, English composer and curate, born in Lowick (d. 1800)
1766 Thomas Bruce, 7th earl of Elgin & Kincardine, British diplomat, born in Broomhall, Fife (d.1841)
1796 Edward Hodges, English organist and composer, born in Bristol (d. 1867)
1804 Richard Owen, English zoologist (Dinosauria), born in Lancaster (d. 1892)
1806 John Sterling, Scottish writer, born in Isle of Bute, (d. 1844)
1811 James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin & Kincardine and Governor (Jamaica), born in London (d. 1863)
1816 William Bowman, English anatomist, born in Nantwich (d. 1892)
1836 Thomas Allbutt, English physiologist (Diseases of the Heart), born in Dewsbury (d. 1925)
1838 George Otto Trevelyan, British statesman and biographer (d. 1928)
1872 Alexander "Alick" Maclean, Composer & conductor (Scarborough Spa Orchestra, 1912-35), born Windsor (d. 1936)
1877 Percy Dean, British naval lieutenant and politician who received the Victoria Cross for saving men during the raid of Zeebrugge, born Blackburn (d. 1939)
1889 John Charles Reith, 1st Baron Reith, British broadcasting executive and 1st director-general of BBC (1927-38), born in Stonehaven, Kincardineshire (d. 1971)
1893 George Llewelyn-Davies, English inspiration for the Peter Pan character, born in London (d. 1915)
1900 Maurice Leyland, English cricket batsman (41 Tests, 2764 runs @ 46.06; Yorkshire 1920-46, 1,000+ runs in 17 consecutive seasons), born in Harrogate, England (d. 1967)
1905 Molly Mary Nesta Keane, née Mary Nesta Skrine, and who also wrote as M. J. Farrell, was an Irish novelist and playwright. (d.1966)
1908 [Vincent] Mad Dog Coll, Irish-American mob hitman, born in Gweedore, Ireland (d. 1932)
1910 Cicely Veronica Wedgwood, Historian (William the Silent) Published under the name C. V. Wedgwood Specializing in the history of 17th-century England & Continental Europe, her biographies & narrative histories are said to have provided a clear, entertaining middle ground between popular & scholarly works. (d.1997)
1914 William John Phillips, British actor (Nothing but a Man, Z-Cars), born Birmingham (d. 1995)
1919 Edmund Hillary, Explorer and Mountaineer (1st to scale Mt Everest with Tenzing Norgay), born in Auckland, New Zealand (d. 2008)
1926 Patricia "Pat" Cutts, British actress (Coronation Street), born in London (d. 1974)
1927 Anthony John Cavendish, British MI6 agent/banker was a British MI6 officer who served in Germany and Austria during the early years of the Cold War. Born in London, but raised in Switzerland grew up speaking English, German, Swiss-German and French. Volunteered for the British Army in 1944 served in Secret Intelligence Middle East (SIME) (d.2013)
1928 Peter Ind, British jazz double bassist, born in Middlesex,
1930 Sally Ann Howes, British singer & actress (Truly Scrumptious-Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, Brigadoon), born in London
1931 Anthony Ernest (Tony) Marsh, Racing driver was a British racing driver from England. His Formula One career was short and unsuccessful, but he enjoyed great success in hill climbing, winning the British Hill Climb Championship on a record six occasions. (d.2009)
1934 Douglas Ernest Vernon Padgett Born Bradford is a former English cricketer, who played more than 500 first-class matches and represented England in Tests twice, both in 1960. Cricket writer Colin Bateman recorded Padgett was, "nimble, happy anywhere in the order, he was a great technician and one of the best batsmen of his era on a bad wicket"
1935 Lord Peter Palumbo, English real estate developer/multi-millionaire Former Chairman of the Arts Council of Great Britain Chairman of The Pritzker Prize for Architecture. born London
1935 Ted Rogers, comedian born Kennington London, started career as a Redcoat entertainer. Best known for hosting the Yorkshire Television game show 3-2-1 from 1978 to 1988 (d.2001)
1938 Diana Rigg, Actress (Emma Peel-Avengers, Game of Thrones), born Doncaster (d.2020)
1938 Roger Hunt MBE Born Glazebury, Lancashire, is a former England footballer who played as a forward in England's World Cup winning side of 1966. Eleven years with Liverpool, he was the club's record goal scorer with 286 goals until being overtaken by Ian Rush. Nonetheless, Hunt remains Liverpool's record league goal scorer. Under Bill Shankly, Hunt won two league titles and an FA Cup. Regarded as one of Liverpool's greatest ever players,
1943 Wendy Richard, English actress (EastEnders), born in Middlesborough, (d. 2009)
1945 John Lodge, English bassist, vocalist, and songwriter (The Moody Blues), born in Birmingham,
1945 Johnny Loughrey, Irish singer, born in Newtownstewart (d. 2005)
1951 Jeff Rawle, Actor, born Birmingham. He is an actor & writer, known for Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005), Doc Martin (2004) and Rebecca (2020)
1956 Charlie Magri, Tunisian British world champ flyweight boxer (1983), born in Tunis, Tunisia
1956 Paul Cook, English rock drummer (Sex Pistols), born in London
1958 Mick MacNeil, Scottish keyboardist (Simple Minds - "Don't You Forget About Me"), born on the Isle of Barra
1968 Julian Rhind-Tutt, Actor, born West Drayton, Middlesex Julian Alistair Rhind-Tutt. He is an actor and producer, known for Stardust (2007), Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001) and Green Wing (2004).
1971 Edward Simon Hunter (Ed) Giddins, Former Cricketer (promising Sussex pace bowler, England A 1995) who played in four Tests from 1999 to 2000. born in Eastbourne, educated at St. Bedes Preparatory School in Eastbourne where he first showed his talent for cricket whilst playing for the school team. Played for four counties during his career – Sussex, Warwickshire, Surrey and Hampshire. Banned from cricket for 18 months and dropped by Sussex after testing positive for cocaine in 1996
1971 Sandra Oh, Korean Canadian actress (Grey's Anatomy), born in Nepean, Ontario
1978 Charlie Korsmo, actor (Dick Tracy, What About Bob)
1981 Damien Finbarr Delaney, Irish footballer is an Irish former professional footballer who played as a defender. Delaney began his career at Cork City. He later played for Leicester City, Hull City and Queens Park Rangers before moving to Ipswich Town in 2009. He became a free agent after leaving the club in August 2012
1987 Nicola Benedetti, Scottish classical violinist, born in West Kilbride
1991 William Tomlin, British actor

On this Day in British History

1654 Anglo-Portuguese treaty, Portugal comes under English control
1712 The Riot Act takes effect in Great Britain.
1871 British Columbia joins the confederation of Canada.
1911 Generals Henry Wilson/Auguste Dubail sign plan for British Expeditionary army in case of war with Germany
1944 Heavy storm hampers British offensive at Caen
1956 Great Britain refuses to lend Egypt money to build Aswan Dam
1981 England set for innings loss v Aust, Botham hits 100 in 87 balls
1982 Hyde Park and Regent's Park bombings: 11 British soldiers and 7 military horses killed in Provisional Irish Republican Army bomb attacks during military ceremonies in London

Northern Ireland

1914 Armed resistance against British rule begins in Ulster
2014 British Open Men's Golf, Royal Liverpool GC: Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland wins wire-to-wire by 2 from Sergio Garcia & Rickie Fowler

Scotland

1304 Wars of Scottish Independence: Fall of Stirling Castle - King Edward I of England takes the last rebel stronghold of the war
1773 Scottish settlers arrive at Pictou, Nova Scotia (Canada)
1793 Scottish explorer Alexander Mackenzie completes the first European east-to-west crossing of America north of Mexico

Deaths in History

1398 Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March, heir to the throne of England, dies at 24
1704 Peregrine White, First English child born in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, dies at 83
1819 John Playfair, Scottish geologist/mathematician, dies
1881 Thomas Fermor-Hesketh, English 1st baron of Hesketh, dies
1897 Jean Ingelow, English poet (b. 1820)
1901 William Cosmo Monkhouse, English poet and critic (b. 1840)
1912 Andrew Lang, Scottish poet, novelist, literary critic, and anthropologist (Andrew Lang's Fairy Books), dies at 68
1942 Patric Cobb, British sea officer, dies in battle
1944 Arthur J Treadwell, English mayor of Stoke Newington, dies at about 71
1953 Jan Struther, British author (b. 1901)
1962 George MacAulay Trevelyan, English royal historian, dies at 86
2003 Nicolas Freeling, English writer (b. 1927)
2006 Ted Grant, British Trotskyist (b. 1913)
2007 Ivor Emmanuel, Welsh singer and actor (Zulu, Show Boat, Kiss Me, Kate), dies of a stroke at 79
Last edited by Richard Frost on Thu Jul 22 2021 9:52am, edited 1 time in total.
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Wed Jul 21 2021 10:50am

21st July 2021

Junk Food Day
Junk foods are usually, by definition, high in fats, sugars, salt, and calories. But more often than not, they are delicious! Junk food day is the perfect day to treat yourself. On Junk Food Day, you get to eat anything you want. Eat any amounts that you want, too. Tomorrow, however, it’s back to a healthy diet.
It doesn’t have to be candies either. Like bacon? Eat so much bacon! Like chili cheese dogs? Eat all the dogs you want. Onion rings, yes please. Pizza? Have it for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Junk Food Day is all about indulging in your favorites. Please Note: Junk food may be hazardous to your health. After all, mom knows what’s best for you. Do so at your own risk. That risk includes having too much and Mom saying: “I told you so!”

Lamington Day
If you have never heard of a lamington before, you are seriously missing out! But don’t worry; this day gives you the perfect opportunity to indulge in this delicious treat. In fact, you may have even tried one before, yet you may have simply not realized that they are called lamingtons! So, what is this delicious treat? It is essentially an Australian cake that is made from squares of sponge cake or butter caked, which is then coated in a layer of chocolate sauce, and finally rolled in desiccated coconut. Is your mouth watering yet? The thin mixture is absorbed into the sponge cake’s outside layer, and it is then left to set. This creates the distinctive texture of the cake. There have been a number of different variations of this cake that have been created over the years. One of the common variations is to have a layer of cream or strawberry jam in between two halves of lamington. Of course, you could put any sort of flavored cream or jam in between two halves of the cake to create your own unique treat. Maybe this is something you could experiment with to celebrate Lamington Day? In fact, there are a lot of different variants of lamingtons that are now enjoyed all around the world. The raspberry variant of this dessert is popular in New Zealand. St Helena Island, which is a small British Overseas Territory in the South Atlantic Ocean has a variant that is similar, known as Coconut Fingers. These are traditionally made for birthdays, weddings, and other celebrations. Coconut cubes or čupavci are eaten in Romania, Hungary, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, and Solvenie. In the United States, coconut bars are very popular in the city of Cleveland. There is also a similar confection, known as little porcupines – ystervarkies – that is sold in South Africa, albeit it is a lot smaller.

A selection of Birthdays

1664 Matthew Prior, English poet and diplomat, born in London (d. 1721)
1676 Anthony Collins, English philosopher (A discourse on free-thinking), born Hounslow (d. 1729)
1693 Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle, British Prime Minister (Whig: 1757-62), born in London (d. 1768)
1817 John Gilbert, British artist, illustrator and engraver, born Blackheath, London (d. 1897)
1851 Sam Bass, American Old West train robber and outlaw, born in Mitchell, Indiana (d. 1878)
1856 Louise Blanchard Bethune, 1st American woman architect, born in Waterloo, New York (d. 1915)
1863 C Aubrey Smith [Charles], British actor (The Prisoner of Zenda), born in London (d. 1948)
1899 Ernest Hemingway, American author (The Old Man and the Sea, Nobel 1954), born in Oak Park, Illinois (d. 1961)
1909 Iorwerth Eiddon Stephen Edwards, English Egyptologist, born in London (d. 1996)
1922 Mollie Sugden, English actress (Are You Being Served?), born in Keighley (d. 2009)
1926 Queenie Watts [Mary Spenton], British singer and actress (Up the Junction, Holiday on the Buses), born in London (d. 1980)
1926 Bill Pertwee, British actor (Dad's Army), born in Amersham (d. 2013)
1935 Julian Pettifer, English TV journalist, born in Malmesbury, Wiltshire
1943 Henry McCullough, Irish guitarist (Wings), born in Portstewart, Northern Ireland (d. 2016)
1944 Buchi Emecheta, Nigerian English writer (Price of Bride), born in Lagos (d. 2017)
1945 Leigh Lawson, English actress (Fire & Sword, Charlie Boy), born in Atherston, Warwickshire
1945 John Lowe, Darts player (BDO world champion 1979, 87, 93), born New Tupton, Derbyshire
1946 Barry "Bean" Whitwam, English rocker (Herman's Hermits), born in Manchester
1948 Cat Stevens [Steven Demetre Georgiou; Yusaf Islam], British singer-songwriter ("Peace Train"; "Moonshadow"), born in London
1951 Robin Williams, American actor and comedian (Mork & Mindy, Jumanji, Dead Poets Society, Good Will Hunting), born in Chicago, Illinois (d. 2014)
1953 Brian Ernest Talbot, Footballer born Ipswich. English former football player and manager. He was capped six times for the England national team.
1955 Henry Preistman, English rocker (Christians - "Harvest For The World"), born in Kingston upon Hull,
1963 Kevin Poole, Footballer, born Bromsgrove. English professional football coach and former player. He became goalkeeping coach at Solihull Moors in September 2020, having previously had the same role at Kidderminster Harriers, Birmingham City and Derby County. Played in the Premier League for Leicester City and Bolton Wanderers, also appeared in England's First Division for Aston Villa before the formation of the Premiership. He also featured for Northampton Town, Middlesbrough, Hartlepool United, Birmingham City and Derby County, before signing for Burton Albion in 2006, aged 43. Latterly employed as goalkeeping coach in addition to being registered as a player, Poole made his final appearance for Burton in 2010. He had an interim spell as manager in 2012, when he retired from playing at the age of 48; however, he later re-registered himself as a player on two occasions due to goalkeeping crises at the club, making him one of the few players in English football ever to be registered to a professional club at the age of 50.
1967 Lance Painter, Bedford England, pitcher (Colorado Rockies)
1971 Charlotte Gainsbourg, French-British actress (La Bûche, Antichrist), born in London
1977 Paul Casey, English golfer (Ryder Cup wins 2004, 06, 18; 3 PGA Tour titles, 13 European Tour titles; PGA C'ship 2020 runner-up), born in Cheltenham
1977 Jaime Murray, British actress (Hutle), born in London
1978 Gary Stewart Teale, Scottish football player and coach, born in Glasgow. Started his career in Scotland in 1995 with Clydebank before spending three years with Ayr United. Moved to England in 2001 when he signed for Wigan Athletic and played an important part in the Wigan side that rose from the third tier (Division Two) to second (Division One) for the first time in the club's history and then went one step further to reach the top flight. Whilst at Wigan he started in the 2006 Football League Cup Final. He then left for Championship side Derby County where he achieved promotion to the Premier League for the second time, although Teale was not a member of the matchday 16 for the 2007 Football League Championship play-off Final. During his time at Derby, he spent time on loan with Plymouth Argyle and Barnsley. After three years and over 100 appearances for the club, Teale left Derby in June 2010 to sign for Sheffield Wednesday. Teale then moved to St Mirren in 2011, and he helped them win the Scottish League Cup in 2013. He became St Mirren manager in 2014, but left this position after the club were relegated in May 2015. Teale represented Scotland at international level, winning 13 caps for his country between 2006 and 2009.
1981 Titus Malachi Bramble, Footballer, born in Ipswich, English former professional footballer who played as a centre back. Played in the Premier League over thirteen consecutive seasons from 2000 and 2013, representing Ipswich Town, Newcastle United, Wigan Athletic and Sunderland. After being released by Sunderland in 2013, he spent several years in a coaching capacity at the Ipswich Town academy, with whom he began his career in 1998. Had a short spell as player coach at Stowmarket Town in 2017. At international level, made 10 appearances for the England under-21s from 2000 and 2002.
1981 Paloma Faith, English singer, songwriter and actress, born in Hackney, London
1984 Liam Matthew Ridgewell, Footballer, born in Bexleyheath1984) is an English retired professional footballer who played as defender. Primarily a centre back but could also play at left back. He is currently a coach at Dover Athletic. Earned eight caps for England at under-21 level, began his senior career with Aston Villa. He spent time on loan at A.F.C. Bournemouth in 2002, before moving to Villa's local rivals Birmingham City in 2007, where he was part of the 2011 Football League Cup Final-winning team. He played for two and a half seasons with West Bromwich Albion, who released him at the end of 2013–14. He then joined the Portland Timbers, whom he captained to victory in MLS Cup 2015. During the MLS off-season, he spent time on loan in England with Wigan Athletic and Brighton & Hove Albion. He ended his career in 2020 after short spells at Hull City and Southend United.
1988 Christopher Phillip Mitchell, Scottish footballer, born in Stirling, Scotland (d. 2016) British professional footballer who played as a defender or midfielder. Mitchell began his senior career at Scottish Premier League club Falkirk who also loaned him to Ayr United. He then had a season in England with Bradford City before joining Queen of the South in 2012. Complications from spinal surgery ended his professional career at Queen of the South, and he left Clyde to establish a new career. Mitchell suffered depression due to his change of career and took his own life at a level crossing at the age of 27
1989 Chris Gunter, Welsh footballer, most capped for Wales (2018), born in Newport

On this Day in British History

1403 Battle of Shrewsbury: Army led by the Lancastrian King of England, Henry IV defeats a rebel army led by Henry "Harry Hotspur" Percy of Northumberland thus ending the Percy challenge to the throne. Also the first battle English archers fought each other on English soil.
1588 First engagement between the English fleet and the Spanish Armada off the Eddystone Rocks
1669 John Locke's Constitution of English colony Carolina is approved
1846 Mormons found 1st English settlement in California (San Joaquin Valley)
1897 Tate Gallery opens in England
1944 British premier Winston Churchill flies to France, meets Montgomery
1994 Tony Blair is declared the winner of the leadership election of the British Labour Party, paving the way for him to become Prime Minister in 1997
2004 The United Kingdom government publishes Delivering Security in a Changing World, a paper detailing wide-ranging reform of the country's armed forces
2007 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, the final book in the series by J. K. Rowling is published worldwide. 11 million copies sell in 24 hrs

Northern Ireland

1920 Irish Nationalist and Loyalists engage in street fighting over the issue of Irish independence from Britain, though Loyalist are reinforced by 1500 British Auxiliaries and 5800 British troops
1944 British premier Winston Churchill flies to France, meets Montgomery
1972 Bloody Friday: within the space of seventy-five minutes, the Provisional Irish Republican Army explode twenty-two bombs in Belfast; six civilians, two British Army soldiers and one UDA volunteer were killed, 130 injured
1976 Christopher Ewart-Biggs, British Ambassador to the Republic of Ireland, and his secretary Judith Cook are assassinated by a bomb planted by the Provisional IRA in his car in Dublin

Deaths in History

1683 Lord William Russell, English politician and plotter against Charles II, beheaded at 43
1688 James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde, English statesman and soldier (b. 1610)
1796-07-21 Robert Burns, Scottish poet (Auld Lang Syne) considered national poet of Scotland, died 37
1917 Christopher J Forster, British RAF-pilot/capt, dies in battle
1967 Pierre Kemp, Dutch poet (English paint box), dies at 80
1976 Christopher Ewart-Biggs, British ambassador to Ireland, assassinated
2008 Lord Stokes [Donald Stokes], English industrialist (British Leyland), dies at 94
2012 Alexander Cockburn, Scottish-born American journalist, dies from cancer at 72
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Richard Frost
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Thu Jul 22 2021 10:43am

22nd July 2021

KHORDAD SAL Zoroastrian (Kadmi)
Khordad Sal is the Birthday of Zarathushtra and falls on the sixth day after NoRuz. Khordad means perfection and the festival of Khordad Sal symbolically celebrates the birthday of Prophet Zarathushtra. It is customary on this day to visit the Fire Temple, to give thanks to Ahura Mazda for giving humanity the Prophet Zarathushtra, to participate in a jashan or thanksgiving ceremony, to listen to stories of the miraculous birth and life of Prophet Zarathushtra, and to share in a happy community meal, a drink and a dance.

Hammock Day
Nothing sounds quite as relaxing as kicking back and relaxing in a hammock – and there’s no better way to celebrate Hammock Day! Get swinging and swaying in the backyard, or somewhere far beyond in the remote outdoors, with something as simple as a piece of fabric tied to a few strings!

Crème Brûlée Day
Crème Brûlée has been with us quite a long time, appearing first in a recipe book by one Francois Massialot in 1691. Known as the Cuisinier royal et bourgeois it held the first recorded recipe for this incredible treat, though when it was translated to English it became known as “Burnt Cream”, which is perhaps not an altogether unjust description of this confection. Oddly, for all that is deeply associated with France, and specifically with Paris, from 1740 to 1980 it appeared in not one French cookbook. Considering that decades reputation for utter hedonism and decadence, Crème Brûlée came back onto the scene in a big way in the 1980’s, and became the “darling of the restaurant boom.” Crème Brûlée Day encourages you to indulge your own decadence, to hunt out recipes for this delicious treat or just restaurants that serve it and experience its luscious richness. Time has led to their being multiple versions you can try, from the traditional Crème Brûlée to crema catalana, a version of the treat from Catalan. Traditionally served in ramekins, the dish has the appearance of a small pie or tart, but once you crack that burnt sugar shell, it’s clear you’re enjoying something truly unique.

Mango Day
Mangos were first cultivated in India 5000 years ago and traveled to Southeast Asia between the 5th and 4th centuries BC. In the 10th Century AD where cultivation began in East Africa. The paisley pattern developed in India is said to be based off of the shape of the mango. It is the national fruit of India, Pakistan, and the Philippines, while also being the national tree of Bangladesh. The mango is cultivated in most frost-free tropical climates, with almost half the world’s mango supply harvested in India, with the second-largest source being China. There is an international mango festival held in Delhi, India. Held every year since 1987. Included is over 50 mango growers from across the country. There are competitions and quizzes on the many aspects of mangos including different uses in cuisine as well as the many different varieties, of which there are more than 550.

Penuche Fudge Day
Even if you are on a strict weight watch and working hard towards that beach body, make sure your cheat day falls on Penuche Fudge Day. The sweet light-brown concoction will make it worth your while! Penuche is a flavor native to New England, but its caramel-like goodness has earned the treat nationwide respect – so much so that it got its own day in the calendar! Penuche stands apart from its fudge relatives mainly because it is based on brown rather than white sugar. This gives it its characteristic colour and texture and makes it lighter than classic fudges. Confectioners often add other ingredients to penuche, most famously pecans, walnuts, or raisins, in order to enhance its texture and taste. Feel free to whip up a batch yourself if you cannot find a local bakery which dispenses the golden brown treat and celebrate Penuche Fudge Day with a yummy bite!

A Selection of Birthdays

1210 Joan of England, Queen consort of Scotland, wife of Alexander II of Scotland (d. 1238)
1830 Herbert Stanley Oakeley, English composer, born in Ealing (d. 1903)
1844 William Archibald Spooner, Oxford Don/reverend/inventor (spoonerisms), b. London (d.1930)
1863 Alec Hearne, Cricket batsman (1 Test; Wisden Cricketer of the Year 1894; Kent), b. Ealing (d.1952)
1889 James Whale, English film director (Frankenstein, Show Boat), born in Dudley (d. 1957)
1920 Sir Hugh Spencer Lisle Dundas, CBE, DSO & Bar, DFC nicknamed "Cocky", was a fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force (RAF) during the Second World War and later a senior broadcasting executive. He was promoted to squadron leader and awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross at the age of 21, advanced to wing commander at 22 & at 23, was awarded the Distinguished Service Order. Became one of the youngest group captains in the RAF. Dundas retired from the RAF in 1949, knighted in 1987 for his services to business and the media. (d. 1995)
1920 Malcolm Hughes, British artist, born in Manchester, England (d. 1997)
1926 Bryan Forbes CBE was a film director, screenwriter, film producer, actor and novelist, described as a "Renaissance man" and "one of the most important figures in the British film industry". He directed the film The Stepford Wives (1975) and wrote and directed several other critically acclaimed films, including Whistle Down the Wind (1961), Séance on a Wet Afternoon (1964), and King Rat (1965). He also scripted several films directed by others, such as The League of Gentlemen (1960), The Angry Silence (1960) and Only Two Can Play (1962).(d. 2013)
1926 Peter Michael Grayson, British showman, born in Manchester (d. 1996)
1929 Vivien Merchant [Ada Thompson], Actress (Alfie/The Homecoming/The Offence) born in Manchester, (d. 1982)
1929 John David Barber was a racing driver from Buckinghamshire. Before his racing career he was a fish merchant in London. He first raced a Cooper-JAP and then bought a Formula Two Cooper-Bristol Mk1 which he raced during 1952. Despite winning a minor race at Snetterton, he had little success and finally crashed the car badly towards the end of the season. (d. 2015)
1930 Sonny Liston, American boxer (world heavyweight champion 1962-64), born in Johnson Township, Arkansas (d. 1970)
1932 William Wilkinson, Conservationist & businessman, born Warminster, England (d. 1996)
1934 Louise Fletcher, actress (One Flew over Cuckoo's Nest), born in Birmingham, Alabama
1935 Tom Cartwright, England cricket medium pacer (5 Tests 1964-65)

1937 John Sidney Ernest Price is a former English cricketer, who played in fifteen Tests for England from 1964 to 1972. Distinctive for his extremely long angled run up and elaborate, though graceful, upright bowling action, Price could bowl out swingers at genuine pace, but his international career was hampered by a succession of injuries. He possessed an excellent arm in the deep, but seldom troubled the opposition with a bat in his hand. He took 734 wickets for Middlesex in 242 matches at just 22.39 each, carrying their attack in the late 1960s, having only established himself in the first team in 1963 at the age of 25, after playing club cricket with Wembley Cricket Club. He also took 192 wickets in limited overs games.
1938 Terence Stamp, English actor (The Collector, Billy Budd), born in London
1944 Rick Davies, British rock vocalist/keyboardist (Supertramp), born in London
1953 Brian Howe, British rock singer (Bad Company, 1986-93 - "This Love"; "Holy Water"), born in Portsmouth, (d. 2020)
1956 Mick Pointer, British rock drummer (Marillion), born in Brill, Buckinghamshire
1961 Calvin Fish born Norwich is a British television commentator for NBC Sports and a former racing driver. Fish began his career in karts at 13. He then moved to Formula Ford in 1979 at age 18 and then British Formula Three. He then went to the United States and competed in various classes of SCCA competition as well as IMSA GT.
1964 Bonnie Langford, English actress (Wombling Free)
1964 Adam Godley is a film, television and theatre actor. He is a Tony Award nominee and has been nominated four times for the Olivier Award. He began his acting career at the age of 9, in a BBC radio production of Hemingway's My Old Man. His first stage role came at age 11, as Prince Giovanni in The White Devil at The Old Vic.
1967 Lauren Booth (born Sarah Jane Booth; is a Broadcaster, journalist & activist holding a VIP Palestinian Authority passport as well as a British passport. Lauren Booth has been motivating women to explore their authentic voice for more than 10 years. As an internationally recognised motivational speaker, broadcaster and presenter, Lauren draws upon skills from a 20 year career on stage and TV to touch lives across the world. From keynotes in London, Texas and Toronto to speaking tours of South Africa, Pakistan and Malaysia,
1967 Rhys Ifans [Rhys Evans], Welsh actor/musician (Notting Hill, Enduring Love), born Haverfordwest
1978 Martyn Lee, Radio presenter is a British national radio broadcaster, Sony award-winning radio producer, Neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) Master Practitioner and Hypnotist. He was a presenter on Absolute 80s from 2010 to 2019. He has been Programme Director for radio stations on the south coast of England including 2CR FM, Original 106 and The Coast 106. he also works with Bournemouth University with their media and radio courses.
1979 James Mason [Atkins], British professional wrestler, born in London
1984 Stewart Downing, English footballer (Middlesbrough), born in Middlesbrough
2013 Prince George of Cambridge, son of Prince William and Catherine, Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, England (3rd in line to the English throne), born in London

On this day in British History

1587 2nd English colony forms on Roanoke Island off North Carolina
1691 Battle at Aghrim: English/Dutch army beats France
1901 British House of Lords, in its role as court, rules trade unions can be sued for actions of its members - in Taff Vale Case
1912 In the face of ever-increasing German naval power, the British Admiralty decides to recall British warships from the Mediterranean and base them in the North Sea
1917 British bomb German lines at Ypres, 4,250,000 grenades
1950 Frank Worrell completes 261 v England at Trent Bridge
1963 Sarawak achieves independence from British colonial rule
1965 Alec Douglas-Home resigned as leader of the Conservative party

Northern Ireland

1972 2 Catholics are abducted, beaten, and shot dead in a Loyalist area of Belfast

Scotland

1298 English defeat Scots at Battle of Falkirk
1484 Battle of Lochmaben Fair - a 500-man raiding party led by Alexander Stewart, Duke of Albany and James Douglas, 9th Earl of Douglas are defeated by Scots forces loyal to Albany's brother James III of Scotland; Douglas is captured

Weddings in History

1972 Business magnate Richard Branson (22) weds Kristen Tomassi

Deaths in History
1525 Richard Wingfield, English diplomat
1726 Hugh Drysdale, British Colonial Governor of Virginia
1734 Peter King, 1st Baron King, Lord Chancellor of England
1915 Sir Sandford Fleming, Scottish-Canadian engineer and inventor (b. 1827)
2005 Jean Charles de Menezes, Brazilian electrician killed by Police (b. 1978)
Last edited by Richard Frost on Thu Jul 22 2021 2:29pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: On this day

Post by kevinchess1 » Thu Jul 22 2021 1:37pm

'1965 Edward Heath succeeds Alec Douglas-Home as leader of the British Conservative party'

Nope
Alec resigned on this day but it was another week before Ed took over
Politically incorrect since 69

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Re: On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Thu Jul 22 2021 2:29pm

kevinchess1 wrote:
Thu Jul 22 2021 1:37pm
'1965 Edward Heath succeeds Alec Douglas-Home as leader of the British Conservative party'

Nope
Alec resigned on this day but it was another week before Ed took over
Corrected
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Fri Jul 23 2021 12:45pm

23rd July 2021

BIRTHDAY OF HAILE SELASSIE I Rastafarian
One of the holiest days of the Rastafarian year. It is celebrated with Nyahbinghi drumming, hymns and prayers.

Peanut Butter and Chocolate Day
Peanut Butter And Chocolate Day celebrates the coming together of a humble legume ground into a creamy delicious paste and a tree nut with delusions of grandeur. Ok, so maybe chocolate isn’t actually experiencing delusions, it is in fact pretty amazing. Peanut Butter has been with us since the time of the Aztecs, where it was unexpectedly used as a sort of toothache remedy, while chocolate was used as an offering to the gods and a drink of royalty. While we can’t speculate about when these two substances first came together, we know that it was a fortuitous day for sweet lovers everywhere. Today you can find peanut butter and chocolate in almost every conceivable combination, and in not one instance has the mixing of the two ever lead to a moment of culinary regret. Peanut Butter and Chocolate Cupcakes are amazing, as are peanut butter cookies with a drizzle of chocolate over the top. Peanut Butter And Chocolate Day encourages you to use your imagination and combine them in any way you can think of!

Sprinkle Day
If there’s anything, any child can tell you it’s that no matter how bad life is, it can always be improved with the addition of sprinkles. These delightful confectionery decorations bring a bright splash of joy to whatever you put them on, and they’re most popular added to cupcakes, cakes, and ice cream. It doesn’t end there though, sprinkles are used in all sorts of things all over the world, and Sprinkles Day is all about learning about these variations and trying them out at home.

International Yada, Yada, Yada Day
The expression “yada yada yada” has been used for years as a way of skipping over uninteresting and/or irrelevant details. Renowned comedian Lenny Bruce, for example, famously used the phrase on many occasions, and there are also many records of it being used in 1940s vaudeville as well. However, it was only in the 1990s, when the TV show Seinfeld’s popularity and power over pop culture was undeniable, that “yada yada yada” really became a ubiquitous catchphrase—in fact, “The Yada Yada” was the name of the 153rd episode of the sitcom. This episode focused on just how much using the phrase can backfire when the details being omitted are actually extremely important, for example the fact that George’s new girlfriend is actually a kleptomaniac who steals to kill time, or that Jerry’s new girlfriend is both racist and anti-Semitic. Hilarity ensues when both these unwitting men find out what kind of people they have been dating, and they must face reality and break off the relationships. In 2009, the Paley Center for Media named “Yada Yada Yada” the No. 1 funniest phrase on “TV’s 50 Funniest Phrases”, with several other Seinfeld catchphrases also making that list.

Gorgeous Grandma Day
Many people around the world say that we do not do enough to celebrate our elderly. Just as well, then, that days such as Gorgeous Grandma Day exist. Gorgeous Grandma Day is a time of the year in which we can celebrate the grannies in our lives. Everybody thinks that their grandma is gorgeous – so what could be better than an entire day devoted to acknowledging that fact? Mother’s and Father’s Day are well known, so Gorgeous Grandma Day is a natural progression.

Vanilla Ice Cream Day
Classic, creamy, and ever so delicious… who doesn’t love vanilla ice cream? You can have it with chocolate cake, apple crumble, sprinkles, strawberry sauce… the list goes on! Of course, it’s just as delightful on its own. A dessert as scrumptious and versatile as this deserves to be celebrated, and Vanilla Ice Cream Day gives you the perfect excuse to do so! Vanilla Ice Cream Day gives you the perfect excuse to indulge in this sweet treat and to experiment with different ways of enjoying it. Like most ice cream flavors, vanilla ice cream was created originally by cooling a mixture of vanilla, sugar, and cream above a container of salt and ice. The sort of vanilla that is used to flavor ice cream varies based on located. In Ireland, more of anise-like flavor is chosen. In North America, a smoky flavor is more desirable.

A selection of birthdays

1705 Francis Blomefield, English topographer (History of Norfolk), born Fersfield, Norfolk (d. 1752)
1773 Thomas Brisbane, British soldier, administrator and astronomer, born Ayrshire (d. 1860)
1823 Coventry Patmore, English poet and critic (The Angel in the House), born Essex (d. 1896)
1828 Jonathan Hutchinson, English surgeon and scientist, born in Selby (d. 1913)
1841 Edmund John Armstrong, Irish poet, born in Dublin (d. 1865)
1849 Geza Zichy, Hungarian composer and one-armed pianist, born at Sztára Castle (d. 1924)
1851 Charles Bannerman, Australian cricket batsman (1st centurion), born Woolwich, Kent (d. 1930)
1853 William Gillette, American stage and silent film actor (Sherlock Holmes), and playwright (Secret Service), born in Hartford, Connecticut, (d. 1937)
1876 William Gillies Whittaker, English composer, born in Newcastle upon Tyne (d. 1944)
1886 Arthur Whitten Brown, Aviator (first nonstop airplane crossing of the Atlantic with John W. Alcock), born in Glasgow, (d. 1948)
1888 Raymond Chandler, American-British mystery novelist and screenwriter (Farewell My Lovely; The Long Goodbye; The Big Sleep), born in Chicago, Illinois (d. 1959)
1892 Haile Selassie [Ras Tafari Makonnen], Emperor of Ethiopia (1930-74), born in Ejersa Goro, Ethiopian Empire (d. 1975)
1894 Arthur Treacher, English TV announcer (Merv Griffin Show), born in Brighton (d. 1975)
1907 Elspeth Huxley, Author (The Flame Trees of Thika and The Mottled Lizard), b. London (d. 1997)
1912 Michael Wilding, British actor (Stage Fright, Courtney Affair, World of Suzie Wong), born in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex (d. 1979)
1913 Michael Foot, Politician & writer, Leader of the Opposition (1980-83), b. Plymouth (d. 2010)
1916 Ronald Ridout, English school textbook author (English Today), born in Farnham (d. 1994)
1921 Harry Hookway, first Chief Executive of British Library (1973-84), born London, (d. 2014)
1921 Peter Twiss, British test pilot (breaking the World Air Speed Record and being the first person to exceed 1,000 mph in flight), born in Lindfield, Sussex (d. 2011)
1924 Gavin Lambert, British-American screenwriter (Inside Daisy Clover), b. E. Grinstead, (d. 2005)
1929 Andrew Rutherford, Scottish scholar and Vice-Chancellor of the University of London (1994-97), born in Helmsdale, Sutherland (d. 1998)
1930 Roger Hassenforder, French racing cyclist (8 stage wins Tour de France 1955-59), born in Sausheim, France (d. 2021)
1931 Te Atairangikaahu, Māori Queen for 40 years (1966-2006), born in Waahi Marae, Huntly, New Zealand (d. 2006)
1933 Richard Rogers, English architect (European Court of Human Rights building), born in Florence
1934 Nicholas Barrington, British high commissioner (Pakistan) and author (A passage to Nuristan: exploring the mysterious Afghan hinterland)
1942 Myra Hindley, English murderess (murdered 5 children with Ian Brady), b. Manchester, (d. 2002)
1946 Andy MacKay, English rock saxophone and oboe player (Roxy Music), born in London
1947 David Essex [Cook], English rock vocalist ("Rock On"), and actor (That'll Be The Day), born in Plaistow, Essex (now part of Greater London)
1953 Graham Gooch, Cricketer, captain of England, opening batsman and prolific run scorer, b. London
1961 Martin Gore, English rocker (Depeche Mode - "Just Can't Get Enough"), born Dagenham, Essex
1965 Slash [Saul Hudson], English-American rock guitarist & songwriter (Guns N' Roses - "Sweet Child o' Mine"), born in London
1973 Fran Healy, Scottish rock musician (Travis), born in Stafford
1973 Monica Lewinsky, American White House intern (improper relationship with Bill Clinton), born in San Francisco, California
1978 Stuart Elliott, Northern Irish footballer, born in Belfast, Northern Ireland
1983 Bec Hewitt, Australian actress (Home and Away), born in Sydney, Australia
1985 Matthew Murphy, English musician (The Wombats), born in Liverpool
1986 Reece Ritchie, English actor (The Outpost), born in Lowestoft
1988 Pippa Bennett-Warner, English actress, born in Banbury
1989 Daniel Radcliffe, English actor (Harry Potter in the Harry Potter series of movies), born London,

On this day in British History

1148 Crusaders begin siege of Damascus during Second Crusade (abandoned 28 July)
1664 4 British ships to drive Dutch out of NY, arrive in Boston
1840 Union Act passed by British Parliament, uniting Upper & Lower Canada
1858 Jewish Disabilities Removal Act passed by British Parliament
1920 British East Africa renamed Kenya and becomes a British crown colony
2019 Boris Johnson is chosen the new British Prime Minister by the ruling Conservative Party to replace Theresa May

Northern Ireland

1970 A ban on parades and public processions until January 1971 is announced by the Stormont government (North Ireland Parliament)
1971 The British Army carry out early morning raids across Northern Ireland and arrest 48 people

Scotland

1745 Charles Edward Stuart, "the Young Pretender", lands at Eriskay Island, Hebrides
1967 Pirate Radio Swinging Scotland closes down for financial reasons
2014 20th Commonwealth Games open in Glasgow, Scotland

Weddings in History

1986 Britain's Prince Andrew (26) weds Sarah Ferguson (26) at Westminster Abbey in London

Deaths in History

1403 Thomas Percy, 1st Earl of Worcester, English rebel (executed) (b. 1343)
1584 John Day, English protestant printer (Book of Martyrs) (b. 1522)
1727 Simon Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt, Lord Chancellor of Great Britain
1773 George Edwards, English naturalist and ornithologist (father of British ornithology), dies at 79
1916 William Ramsay, Scottish chemist who discovered noble gases (Nobel 1904), dies at 63
1932 Tenby Davies, Welsh half-mile world champion runner, dies at 48
1996 Jessica "Decca" Mitford, English author, activist and one of the Mitford sisters, dies at 78
2014 Dora Bryan [Broadhurst], English actress (Taste of Honey), dies at 91
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Sat Jul 24 2021 11:41am

24th July 2021

24/25 July (Saturday/Sunday) ASALHA PUJA or DHAMMA DAY Buddhist
Dhammacakka day – ‘The turning of the wheel of teaching’. A Theravada celebration of the First Proclamation by Gautama to five ascetics in the Deer Park near Benares. In it he taught the Middle Way, the Noble Eightfold Path and the Four Noble Truths.

Tequila Day
Derived from the blue agave plant, humans have been making something like tequila for at least a couple of thousand years. As early as 150 B.C., a predecessor of tequila, called ‘pulque’ was believed to have been made by civilizations predating the ancient Aztecs. When making tequila, the hearts of the agave plant (called piñas) are removed and cooked, then they are ground and fermented for anywhere from a few months to three years. Like wine, the type of soil the plant is grown in can impact the taste of the final product. Unlike wine or other drinks made from fruit, once an agave plant is used to make tequila, it cannot be reused. To qualify as “tequila”, at least 51% of the product must be derived from the blue agave plant that is prevalent in Mexico. Today, however, many manufacturers of the drink have much higher standards and will make it from a full 100% blue agave. These versions of tequila are typically higher quality and will usually be more expensive than the mixed versions. Modern-day tequila is like a few other alcoholic beverages (champagne, cognac or bourbon) in that it can only be named “tequila” if it is made in a certain place. In the case of tequila, this place is Mexico. While specifically most tequilas originate from Jalisco, other qualifying regions include Michoacán, Tamaulipas, Guanajuato, or Nayarit. Tequila Day is the celebration of everything to do with this classic drink, whether it is enjoyed straight or as part of a tasty cocktail. In 2018, Tequila Day was officially recognized by the Mexican government, and now everyone wants to celebrate–not just today but all year round!

Drive-Thru Day
For one day, Drive-Thru Day encourages you to live on the wild side. Forget about buying locally sourced produce, organic vegetables, and getting your five a day; sometimes you don’t have the time or energy to cook good, nutritious food from scratch, and on Drive-Thru Day you can take a short-cut without feeling guilty!

Pioneer Day
Pioneer Day has been created in order to commemorate the day the very first group of Mormon pioneers came to Salt Lake Valley. While the date is considered an official state holiday in Utah, there are also celebrations around the world. After all, pioneers come in many different shapes and forms, and so a lot of people use this date to celebrate pioneers in a broader context, while also paying tribute to the Mormon pioneers in the process. For the Mormon faith, though, it is an especially important date. Nevertheless, local people also consider it important in terms of recognizing everyone who has contributed to the state, irrespective of their background or their religion.

Cousins Day
Remember those fun times at grandpa and grandma’s house when the whole family reunited and you spent countless hours playing with your cousins while the grownups discussed politics and mortgages? Many of us grew up around our cousins, spending summer and winter breaks with them and slowly walking into life together. Then came college and that amazing job opportunity out of state, and we gradually lost touch.

Because most of us found a best friend in our cousin at some point in our lives, Cousins Day was born. The origin of this unofficial holiday is unknown, but the reason for its existence is clear: it’s the time of the year to rekindle cousin affection and reestablish those beautiful and strong childhood bonds. Wherever you are on Cousins Day, take a minute or two to ring up or text your cousins near and far. They will surely be thinking of you then, too!

Tell An Old Joke Day
We all know someone for whom every day is Tell An Old Joke Day, but there’s now a day when we can all put aside our reticence and let rip with our own ‘I say, I say, I say’ and ‘Knock, knock’ chestnuts. Tell An Old Joke Day is your opportunity to raise the nervous wreck from the quivering depths, bring the awful-smelling noseless dog back in from the cold, and press the button for the chicken stuck forever at the pedestrian crossing. Like any endangered species, old jokes must reproduce if they are not to die out entirely, and the old ones are supposed to be the best, anyway. There may be a lot of groaning from initiates, but there’s no joke so old that at least one person hasn’t heard it yet. Why should they be allowed to escape the suffering of the rest of us?

A selection of Birthdays

1725 John Newton, English cleric and hymnist, born in Wapping, London (d. 1807)
1802 Alexandre Dumas, French author (The Three Musketeers, The Count of Monte Cristo), born in Aisne, France (d. 1870)
1807 Ira Aldridge, famed African American Shakespearian actor (Othello), b. New York (d. 1867)
1867 Fred Tate, English cricketer (father of Maurice, 1 Test, Eng v Aus 1902), born Brighton (d. 1943)
1867 Edward Frederic Benson, English novelist, born in Wellington College, Berkshire (d. 1940)
1874 Oswald Chambers, Scottish Baptist and Holiness Movement minister and writer (My Utmost for His Highest), born in Aberdeen (d. 1917)
1878 Edward Plunkett, 18th Baron of Dunsany, Irish sci-fi writer (Time & Gods), born London (d. 1957)
1895 Robert Graves, English writer & poet (I Claudius) [or 6/26], born London (d. 1985)
1897 Amelia Earhart, American aviator (1st woman to fly solo across the Atlantic), born in Atchison, Kansas (d. 1939)
1902 Nora Swinburne [Leonora Mary Johnson] Actress (Quo Vardis, Dinner at Ritz, River) b. Bath (d.2000)
1907 Hughie Charles, English songwriter and impresario, born in Manchester (d. 1995)
1913 George H. Brown, English film producer (Hotel Sahara), born in London (d. 2001)
1914 David Miles Bensusan-Butt, English economist, born in Colchester (d. 1994)
1917 John Hillaby, English writer and traveller, born in England (d. 1996)
1927 Wilfred Josephs, English composer, born in Gosforth, Newcastle upon Tyne (d. 1997)
1929 Peter Yates, English film director (Breaking Away, Bullitt), born in Aldershot (d.2011)
1935 Les Reed, English songwriter (It's Not Unusual), born in Woking, Surrey
1941 Tony Dunne, Irish soccer left-back (33 caps, Republic of Ireland; Manchester United; Bolton Wanderers; Irish Footballer of the Year 1969), born in Dublin (d. 2020)
1942 Heinz [Burt], British rock bassist (The Tornados - "Telstar"), born in Detmold, The Free State of Lippe (now Germany) (d. 2000)
1944 Barbara Thompson, British jazz saxophonist and composer, born in Oxford
1944 Jim Armstrong, Irish rock guitarist (Them), born in Belfast
1948 Marvin the Martian, Warner Bros. cartoon character created by Chuck Jones and Michael Maltese (Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series), first debuts in "Haredevil Hare"
1957 Robbie Grey, English rock singer (Modern English - "I Melt With You")
1957 Walter "Wattie" Buchan, Scottish punk rock singer (The Exploited), born in Edinburgh
1958 Mick Karn [Andonis Michaelides], English musician (Japan), born in Nicosia, Cyprus (d. 2011)
1961 Kerry Michael Dixon, English retired professional footballer who played as a forward. His club career was spent most notably at Chelsea, where he won the Second Division twice. His 193 goals across all competitions made him their third-highest goal scorer of all time. For three seasons in a row, 1982–83, 1983–84 and 1984–85, he was the top goal scorer in his teams' divisions, 3 (with Reading), 2 and 1 (with Chelsea) respectively. Dixon scored four goals in eight international appearances for the England national football team, and represented the nation at the 1986 FIFA World Cup.
1966 Martin Keown, English soccer defender (43 caps; Arsenal, Aston Villa), born in Oxford
1969 Jennifer "J.Lo" Lopez, American actress and pop singer (Selena), born in The Bronx, New York
1971 John Partridge, British singer (Cats) and actor (EastEnders), born in Radcliffe, Lancashire
1977 Danny Dyer, English actor and television presenter
1988 Luke Mitchell, Scottish murderer

On this day in British History

1148 Louis VII of France lays siege to Damascus during the Second Crusade
1673 Astronomer, Mathematician and Physicist, Edmund Halley enters The Queen's College, Oxford, as an undergraduate
1692 French defeat William III of England at Steinkirk (Enghein)
1704 English and Dutch troops occupy Gibraltar
1851 Window tax abolished in Britain
1886 China takes British protectorate of Burma
1935 1st greetings telegram sent in Britain
1967 First modern hospice St Christopher's founded by Nurse and Social Worker, Dr. Cicely Saunders in London, beginning of modern palliative care and the hospice movement
2019 New UK PM Boris Johnson drastically reshapes cabinet in his first day in office, appointing Dominic Raab as Foreign Secretary, Priti Patel as Home Secretary and Sajid Javid as Chancellor

Scotland

1411 Battle of Harlaw, one of the bloodiest battles in Scotland, takes place
1567 Mary Queen of Scots is forced to abdicate; her 1-year-old son becomes King James VI of Scots
1986 13th Commonwealth Games open in Edinburgh

Weddings in History

1554 Queen Maria of England marries Philip, king of Naples/Jerusalem

Deaths in History

1124 Alexander I, King of Scots (1107-24), dies at 47
1768 Nathanial Lardner, English theologian (b. 1684)
1837 Charles Hodges, English/Dutch portrait painter
1964 Erwin Finlay-Freundlich, British astronomer (theory of relativity), dies at 79
1974 James Chadwick, English physicist (Nobel 1935, discovered neutron), dies at 82
1979 Archie Duncan, Scottish actor (The Adventures of Robin Hood, Sherlock Holmes), dies at 65
1996 Jock Wallace, Scottish football player and manager, dies at 60
2005 Richard Doll, English epidemiologist (pioneer in research linking smoking to health problems), dies at 92
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Sun Jul 25 2021 11:23am

25th July 2021

Wine and Cheese Day
There are some things in the world that were just meant to go together, like Chocolate and Peanut Butter, oil and vinegar, and of course wine and cheese! Since time out of mind wine and cheese have been paired together and served at all the most important of events among the highest class of people. Wine And Cheese Day celebrates this eternal bonding and the elegance it engenders.

Parents’ Day (US) UN celebration June 1st
Parents’ Day is celebrated in many different countries all over the world. It was proclaimed an official day by the United Nations, yet it has also been honoured in the United States ever since 1994. This is when it was signed into law by President Bill Clinton. The day was established as one for recognizing, supporting, and uplifting the role of parents when it comes to raising children around the world. It was Trent Lott, a Republican Senator, who actually introduced the bill.

Carousel Day
When we think of carousels, we think of the beautifully designed horses, with golden metal poles mounted down the centre and accompanied by circus music. Since the early 1800’s, carousels are all about the children, laughing as they go round and round. While there are many designs to carousels, the idea of a carousel has been around for centuries. So, to observe the fine-tuned history of carousels, Carousel Day is a day just for that! So strap in and enjoy the ride.

Hot Fudge Sundae Day
It’s hard to go wrong with ice cream—no matter what you do with it, it seems like it always results in something delicious. Ice cream sandwiches, ice cream cake, milkshakes, ice cream fondue…need we say more? And one of the few things that can make ice cream even better than it is thick, hot, sweet fudge. Fudge and ice cream…if that’s not a reason for celebration, what is?

Thread The Needle Day
There are a lot of different meanings for threading the needle. So, we will help you to understand this a bit better. Firstly, we have the literal sense of the word, which is about taking a thread and guiding it using a sewing needle! This is pretty self-explanatory, right? However, the phrase has then been used for a number of other instances as well. We then have the metaphorical sense, which is what this day is highly focused on. This is about finding a path through two views that are contrasting to one and other. There are many different ways that this can apply to people’s lives. There are then different uses of threading the needle, which aren’t as common, but are still used by some people around the world. For example, this is a phrase that we often see used in sports. It can be employed to describe a tight space within the ball that needs to be moved through. It is also used in yoga. This is a pose, which is also known as the para balasana. If you are a fan of yoga, you can research this move online and give it a try yourself on Thread The Needle Day! Plus, this is also a game move people use on billiards. It is a term to describe the ball being shot precisely through a pathway that is narrow.

A selection of Birthdays

1639 Thomas Tompion, English clock maker (cylinder tunnel), born in Bedfordshire (d. 1713)
1758 Elizabeth Hamilton, Scottish author (The cottagers of Glenburnie), born in Belfast (d. 1816)
1795 James Barry [Margaret Ann Bulkley], female disguised as a man, surgeon general (British army), born County Cork (d. 1865)
1848 Arthur Balfour, British Prime Minister (Conservative: 1902-05) and Foreign Secretary (Balfour Declaration), born in Whittingehame House, Haddington, East Lothian (d. 1930)
1855 Edward Solomon, English composer, born in Lambeth, London (d. 1895)
1861 Andrew Cowper Lawson, Scottish-Canadian Geologist who was the first person to identify and name the San Andreas Fault, born in Anstruther, Scotland (d. 1952)
1866 Frederick Frost Blackman, English botanist, born in London (d. 1947)
1884 Davidson Black, Canadian paleoanthropologist and doctor of anatomy who identified "Peking Man", born in Toronto, Ontario (d. 1934)
1885 Benito Lynch, Irish-Argentine writer (Caranchos de la Florida), born Buenos Aires (d. 1951)
1905 Denys Watkins-Pitchford, British writer and illustrator (The Little Grey Men), born in Lamport, Northamptonshire (d. 1990)
1908 Bill Bowes, Cricketer (Bodyline bowler, 68 wkts for England), born Elland, Yorkshire, (d. 1987)
1913 John Cairncross, British civil servant and spy (5th man - Cambridge Five), born in Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire (d. 1995)
1920 Rosalind Franklin, Chemist and Molecular Biologist, co-discoverer of the structure of DNA, born London (d. 1958)
1921 John Christopherson, English artist and collector, born in Blackheath, London (d. 1996)
1925 Jerry Paris, American director (Happy Days) and actor (Dick Van Dyke Show-Jerry), born in San Francisco, California (d. 1986)
1930 Annie Ross, British-American jazz singer (Lambert, Hendricks & Ross - "Twisted") & actress, born in London (d. 2020)
1936 (Gerry) Gerald Ashmore, former Motor Racing driver, born West Bromwich. He participated in four Formula One World Championship Grands Prix, scoring no championship points. Started his career in Formula Junior along with his brother Chris, in 1960. Later that year he competed at Zeltweg and Innsbruck, finishing third behind Hans Herrmann and Wolfgang von Trips. In 1961 he moved to Formula One with a privately run Lotus 18 & scored a second place in the Naples Grand Prix after taking pole position. Later that year he took part in the British Grand Prix but retired after just a few laps. His last appearance in a World Championship event was in his Lotus in 1962 at Monza when he failed to qualify.
1937 Andrew Colin Renfrew, Baron Renfrew of Kaimsthorn FBA, FSA, Hon FSA Scot. Archeologist (Anatolian hypothesis), born in Stockton-on-Tees, is an archaeologist, paleolinguist and Conservative peer noted for his work on radiocarbon dating, the prehistory of languages, archaeogenetics, and the prevention of looting at archaeological sites. Renfrew was formerly the Disney Professor of Archaeology at the University of Cambridge and Director of the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research and is now a Senior Fellow of the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research.
1941 Peter Suschitzky, Polish-British cinematographer and photographer, born in London
1943 Jim McCarty, Rock drummer (Yardbirds - "For Your Love"; Renaissance, 1969-70), born Liverpool
1945 Labi Siffre, English singer-songwriter, born in London
1948 Brian Stableford, British sci-fi author (Day of Wrath), born in Shipley
1950 Mark Clarke, English bassist (Colosseum; Tempest; Uriah Heep), born in Liverpool
1954 Lynne Frederick, English actress (Schizophrenia), born in Middlesex (d. 1994)
1963 Julian Hodgson, English chess player, born in London
1967 Matt LeBlanc, American actor (Joey Tribbiani-Friends), born in Newton, Massachusetts
1970 Lord Nicholas Windsor, youngest son of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, born in King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London
1973 Dani Filth [Daniel Davey], British lyricist, and heavy metal singer (Cradle of Filth), born Hertford
1973 Kevin Phillips, English footballer (Sunderland), born in Hitchin
1974 Gareth Thomas, Welsh rugby player, born in Sarn, Wales
1978 Louise Brown, English woman who was the first person to be born through in vitro fertilization, born in Oldham
1979 Ali Carter, English professional snooker player, born in Colchester
1985 Jasmine Lennard, British model and reality TV star (Big Brother), born in Belgravia, London
1988 Anthony Christopher Stokes, Irish footballer, born in Dublin Plays as a striker. He was also an Irish international, having played at the under-21, team B and Republic of Ireland national football team. Currently on trial with League of Ireland side Shamrock Rovers. Began his senior career with Arsenal, but established himself with a successful loan spell with Falkirk in 2006, scoring 14 goals in 16 SPL games. Signed for Sunderland in a £2 million deal, but struggled to hold down a place in the Sunderland first team. Moved back to Scottish football when Hibernian signed him for £500,000 in August 2009. Again enjoyed success in the SPL, scoring over 20 goals in his only full season with Hibs. Moved to boyhood heroes Celtic shortly after the start of the following season for a fee of around £1.2 million. Played regularly for Celtic under the management of Neil Lennon and enjoyed success, but fell out of favour under Ronny Deila. In the latter part of the 2015–16 season he was loaned to Hibernian, who he helped win the 2015–16 Scottish Cup. After a season with Blackburn Rovers joined Hibernian for a third time in 2017 but was released in 2018. Then had short spells with Greek club Apollon Smyrni, Iranian clubs Tractor and Persepolis, & Turkish club Adana Demirspor. Most recently with Livingston. played in nine full internationals for the Republic of Ireland between 2007 - 2014.

On this day in British History

1759 British capture Fort Niagara from French (7 Years' War)
1775 Maryland issues currency depicting George III trampling Magna Carta
1797 Horatio Nelson loses more than 300 men and his right arm during the failed conquest attempt of Tenerife (Spain)
1814 Battle of Niagara Falls (Lundy's Lane); Americans defeat British
1814 English engineer George Stephenson introduces his first steam locomotive, a travelling engine designed for hauling coal on the Killingworth wagonway named Blücher
1901 Emily Hobhouse addresses public meetings in Britain on the concentration camps during the South African War
1909 France's Louis Bleriot, makes 1st airplane flight across English Channel
1959 SR-N1 hovercraft crosses the English Channel from Calais to Dover in just over 2 hours.
2002 17th Commonwealth Games open in Manchester, England

Scotland

1745 Jacoibite Rising Bonnie Prince Charlie lands on Eriskay, Hebrides

Weddings in History

1814 Inventor Charles Babbage (21) weds Georgina Whitmore at St. Michael's Church in Devon
1839 British PM William Gladstone (29) weds Catherine Glynne (27) in England

Deaths in History

1643 Robert Pierrepont, 1st Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull, English statesman (b. 1584)
1681 Urian Oakes, English-born President of Harvard University (b. 1631)
1804 William Forsyth, English gardening expert (Forsythia), dies
1834 Samuel Taylor Coleridge, British romantic poet, Critic and Philosopher (Rime of Ancient Mariner), Died from Heart failure at 61
1843 Charles Macintosh, Scottish chemist and inventor (b. 1766)
1865 James Barry [Margaret Ann Bulkley], British military surgeon and the 1st woman in Great Britain to become a qualified medical doctor, dies at 66 or 67
1995 Janice Elliott, English novelist, dies at 63
1996 Raymond O'Malley, English teacher, dies at 87
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Mon Jul 26 2021 10:58am

July 26th 2021

Aunt and Uncle Day
The amount of aunts and uncles you have will vary from family to family. However, they often play a crucial role throughout your life; taking you to fun places, babysitting you when your parents are out, buying you birthday and Christmas presents and giving you important advice and support when you need it most. After all, there are some things we just don’t feel comfortable talking to our parents about. So if you love your aunts and uncles, why not call them, spend the day with them, or send them a card or a gift? This is your day to show them how much you appreciate all of the effort they have put in, and all of the fun and laughter they have provided over the years.

Coffee Milk Shake Day
Pretty much everyone loves coffee, and a huge part of humanity even depends on it to wake them up every morning. But what happens during the summer, when it’s too hot to enjoy a steaming cup of coffee without sweating profusely? There’s nothing pleasant about soaking your clothes with sweat right after your morning shower. Luckily, someone thought of all of those things and invented something wonderful: coffee milkshakes! The term “milkshake” was first used in 1885. At that time, milkshakes were very different from what you can currently get. They were alcoholic drinks made with eggs and whiskey, much like today’s eggnog. Soon after, however, the word “milkshake” began to refer to ice cream-based drinks made with chocolate, strawberry, or vanilla syrups. By the 1930s, milkshakes were a popular drink at the kind of malt shops depicted in many of today’s movies, which were common student meeting places. In the 1940s and 1950s, sharing a milkshake became a gesture of intimacy between a couple who were dating. Somewhere along the way, coffee was added to milkshakes to give them both a caffeine boost and the unique coffee flavour loved by millions worldwide, and then a day was created to celebrate the delicious combination of coffee and ice cream.

Holistic Therapy Day
Western medicine has been considered to have some rather severe issues when viewed from other forms of medical practice throughout the world. Holistic Therapy is one such practice that focuses on the body, spirit, and mind and uses these three factors working in conjunction to help promote natural healing in the body without unnecessary procedures or medication. Holistic Therapy is your opportunity to learn more about this alternative medicine and how it can make essential changes in your life. The history of Holistic Therapy is quite ancient, stretching back to the medical and spiritual philosophies of Hippocrates, considered to be one of the most important figures in the world of medicine. Hippocrates put forth the idea that focusing purely on ailments of the body wasn’t a healthy or successful way of dealing with poor health. Instead, he felt it was important to treat every facet of the human experience in order to get a complete and sustainable recovery. Modern Holistic Therapy feels that modern traditional medicine comes with certain concerns, specifically the habit of focusing on treating symptoms that are being caused by ailments instead of rooting out the issue at its core. Prior to the 1970’s, this wasn’t a typical medical practice. Instead, they took the entire environment of the patient into account and did their best to treat the whole patient. Modern philosophies of medicine believe that the mind and body are separate entities and must be treated as such. Holistic Therapy is making strides to help bring the practice of whole body, whole person treatment into the modern medical practice. But its designation as ‘alternative medicine’ means that it has difficulty gaining ground in the medical community, and is generally treated as a form of quackery.

All or Nothing Day
The Romans understood it so well they had a saying: “Carpe Diem” or seize the day. All Or Nothing Day takes that spirit and urges people to break through their barriers, ignore the fears that hold them back, and make that big commitment to a better life. Whether it’s applying for a job, trying an extreme sport, or just saying ‘sorry’ to someone, everyone has something they would love to do if only they weren’t so scared. All Or Nothing Day is the day for the girding of loins, taking it on the chin, and confronting those fears. As it says, by breaking the deadlock, you may end up with all or nothing, but at least the barrier is broken. You succeed or fail, but you are no longer paralyzed by indecision.

One Voice Day
‘One Voice Day’ is a global initiative to unite all countries of the world in the reading of the Universal Peace Covenant at exactly 6 p.m. UT on July 26 each year. The Universal Peace Covenant is a 577-word pledge and plea to bring families, countries and the world together in a peaceful co-existence despite our constantly changing world. During this time individuals and groups in all parts of the world unite spiritually to declare their commitment to global peace. Created from October 1996 to April 1997, One Voice Day is the result of spiritual collaboration. People from all walks of life, several religious beliefs and nationalities, diverse occupations, all races, as young as seventeen and as old as seventy-five, came together with the intention of creating a timeless document that would accurately reflect humanity’s hope, challenge, and destiny. The timeless wisdom in the 577-word document serves as an instrument defining how to think peacefully and live peaceably in a world that is constantly changing. Read the Covenant with people around the world.

A Selection of birthdays

1727 Horatio Gates, British-American soldier (general of the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War), born in Maldon, Essex (d. 1806)
1739 George Clinton, American soldier and 4th Vice President of the USA (1805-12), born in Little Britain, New York (d. 1812)
1782 John Field, Irish pianist and composer (Nocturnes), born in Dublin (d. 1837)
1791 Franz Xaver Wolfgang Mozart, Austrian composer and 6th child of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, born in Vienna, Austria (d. 1844)
1802 Winthrop Mackworth Praed, English politician and poet, born in London (d. 1839)
1842 Alfred Marshall, English economist (Principles of Economics), born in London (d. 1924)
1856 George Bernard Shaw, Irish dramatist (Pygmalion, Nobel Prize for Literature 1925), born in Dublin (d. 1950)
1872 George Louis Beer, American historian (authority on British colonies), born in Staten Island, New York (d. 1920)
1875 Carl Jung, Swiss Psychiatrist (founded analytic psychology), born in Kesswil, Switzerland (d. 1961)
1881 James Cecil Parke, Irish tennis, rugby player (Australasian C'ship 1912, Ireland rugby 20 caps), born in Clones (d. 1946)
1894 Aldous Huxley, English author (Brave New World, Island), born in Godalming, Surrey (d. 1963)
1895 Jerry Verno, Actor (River of Unrest, Ourselves Alone, Sweeney Todd), born London, (d. 1975)
1895 Jane Bunford, Britain's tallest-ever person measuring 2.41 metres (7 ft 11 in) at the time of her death, born in Bartley Green, Northfield, Birmingham (d. 1922)
1896 Henry Birkin, British racing driver (Bentley Boys), born in Nottingham (d. 1933)
1904 Jack Westrup, English composer, born in London (d. 1975)
1907 Gioconda de Vito, Italian-British violinist, born in Martina Franca, Italy (d. 1994)
1909 Peter Thorneycroft, British politician, born in Dunston, Staffordshire (d. 1994)
1909 Vivian Vance [Jones], American stage and screen actress (I Love Lucy - "Ethel Mertz"; The Lucy Show - "Viv"), born in Cherryvale, Kansas (d. 1979)
1917 Richard Burnell, British rower (Olympic gold 1948), born in Henley-on-Thames (d. 1995)
1919 James Lovelock, British scientist and environmentalist, born in Letchworth. Independent scientist, environmentalist and futurist. He is best known for proposing the Gaia hypothesis, which postulates that the Earth functions as a self-regulating system. With a PhD in medicine, Lovelock began his career performing cryopreservation experiments on rodents, including successfully thawing frozen specimens. His methods were influential in the theories of cryonics (the cryopreservation of humans). He invented the electron capture detector, and using it, became the first to detect the widespread presence of CFCs in the atmosphere. While designing scientific instruments for NASA, he developed the Gaia hypothesis. In the 2000s, he proposed a method of climate engineering to restore carbon dioxide-consuming algae. He has been an outspoken member of Environmentalists for Nuclear, asserting that fossil fuel interests have been behind opposition to nuclear energy, citing the effects of carbon dioxide as being more harmful to the environment, and warning of global warming due to the greenhouse effect. He has written several environmental science books based upon the Gaia hypothesis since the late 1970s.
1919 Kenneth Snowman, British jeweller and antiquarian, born in Hampstead, London (d. 2002)
1928 Stanley Kubrick, American director (2001 A Space Odyssey, Dr Strangelove, Lolita), born in The Bronx NY (d. 1999)
1928 Don Beauman, British Formula One racing driver, born in Farnborough, Hampshire (d. 1955)
1930 Barbara Jefford, British actress (James Joyce's Ulysses), born Plymstock, Devon (d. 2020)
1933 Lance Percival, English actor and comedian (That Was The Week That Was), born in Sevenoaks, Kent (d. 2015)
1934 Anthony Gilbert, British composer, born in London. Trained initially as a translator, then studied composition with Mátyás Seiber privately & with Alexander Goehr and Anthony Milner at Morley College He also studied with Gunther Schuller at Tanglewood. He was head of the School of Composition at the Royal Northern College of Music until 1999. Amongst his students there were Simon Holt, Martin Butler and James Saunders. He is published by the University of York Music Press (since 1994) and Schott Music (works prior to 1994).
1936 Mary Millar, English actress (Keeping Up Appearances), born in Doncaster (d. 1998)
1938 Sir David Keith Peters GBE FRS FMedSci FRCP FRCPE FRCPath FLSW Welsh physician, born in Baglan, Glamorgan is a retired physician & academic. He was Regius Professor of Physic at the University of Cambridge from 1987 to 2005, where he was also head of the School of Clinical Medicine.
1943 Mick Jagger, English rock vocalist, songwriter (Rolling Stones - "Let's Spend the Night Together"; "Sympathy For The Devil"), actor (Performance), and knight, born in Dartford, Kent
1943 Roger Smalley, British-Australian composer, born in Swinton, Lancashire (d. 2015)
1945 Helen Mirren [Ilyena Lydia Vasilievna Mironoff], English actress (The Queen, The Madness of King George), born in London
1947 Pauline Clare, Britain's first female Chief Constable (Lancashire)
1949 Roger Taylor, English rock drummer (Queen - "Bohemian Rhapsody"), born in Norfolk
1950 Susan George, English actress (Straw Dogs, Mandingo), born in London
1950 Duncan Mackay, British composer and keyboard player, born in Leeds
1959 Kevin Spacey, American actor (American Beauty, House of Cards), born in South Orange, New Jersey
1961 Andy Connell, English musician and composer (Swing Out Sister), born in Manchester
1967 Jason Statham, British actor (The Transporter, Crank), born in Shirebrook, Derbyshire
1973 Kate Beckinsale, British actress (Underworld series), born in London
1974 Dean Constantine Sturridge, English football striker, born in Birmingham an English former footballer who played as a striker. As of the 2013-14 Premier League season, he is a football match commentator for beIN Sports
1977 Emma Barton, English actress (Eastenders), born in Portsmouth
1993 Stormzy [Michael Owuo Jr.] English rapper (Shut Up), born in London

On This day in British History

1469 Wars of the Roses: Battle of Edgecote Moor - Pitting the forces of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick against those of King Edward IV
1579 Admiral and Navigator Francis Drake leaves San Francisco to cross Pacific Ocean
1588 English Admiral John Hawkins knighted for his actions against the Armada
1678 England and Netherlands signs treaty: sending ultimatum to France
1758 British battle fleet under General James Wolfe conquers Louisbourg
1803 The Surrey Iron Railway, arguably the world’s first public railway, opens in what is now south London. Horse-drawn carriages linked Wandsworth and Croydon.
1858 Baron Lionel de Rothschild becomes the 1st Jewish person elected to the British Parliament
1866 Canoe Club opens in England
1902 Australia beat England by 3 runs at Old Trafford
1916 The US Protests the 'Blacklist' issued by the British forbidding trade with some 30 US firms
1944 The first German V-2 rocket hits Great Britain (nicknamed "gasometer").
1945 After Labour landslide in general election, Clement Attlee becomes British Prime Minister
1945 Winston Churchill resigns as Britain's Prime Minister after election defeat
1965 Republic of Maldives gains independence from Britain (National Day)

Northern Ireland

1497 "Edward IV's son" Perkin Warbeck's army lands in Cork
1914 Irish Volunteers unload a shipment of 1,500 rifles and 45,000 rounds of ammunition arriving from Germany aboard Erskine Childers' yacht the Asgard; British troops fire on jeering crowd on Bachelors Walk, Dublin, killing three citizens

Scotland

1524 James V declared fit to govern by the Scottish Parliament

Deaths in History

1712 Thomas Osborne, English PM (1690-94), dies at 80
1723 Robert Bertie, 1st Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven, English statesman
1915 James Murray, Scottish lexicographer and philologist (Oxford English Dictionary), dies at 78
1918 Eduard "Mick" Mannock, British WW I flying ace (Victoria Cross), dies at 31
1919 Sir Edward Poynter, British painter (b. 1836)
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Richard Frost
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Tue Jul 27 2021 10:38am

27th July 2021

Walk On Stilts Day
If you’ve ever been to the circus or a parade, you have without a doubt seen someone walking along high above the crowd on a pair of stilts. To the common man, stilts are the mainstay of theatrical performers, clowns, jugglers, and that odd looking fellow from the Liberal Arts College in their annual parade. What most people don’t know is that stilts have a long and august history in many cultures, for reasons varying from ceremonial to purely practical. Walk on Stilts Day is the perfect time to learn about this surprisingly useful tools, and maybe try out a pair for yourself! A Stilt is described as a ‘pillar, post, or pole employed to assist a person or structure in standing above the ground’. While most of us, as mentioned previously, have only seen them employed for the purposes of entertainment, they have also been used in many industries, from shepherding to construction. In some cases stilts are actually employed in the construction of a building as part of the permanent structure. After all, if you find yourself living in a flood plain, upon the beach, or some other area where the ground is less than reliable, what better way to protect yourself than raising yourself above it all? In Kent they are used in the picking of the Hop harvest. The process of employing stilts for mobility, however, has been around since as far back as the 6th Century BC. In the Landes region of France, shepherds would use them to watch their flocks from an elevated position, while those who lived in town often used them to traverse the sodden earth in their normal activities. While they fell out of use for such practical uses for many years, recently there has been a resurgence in those industries where there is a need to work at a height further above ground than the worker can reach, and consistently enough where moving a ladder is at best inconvenient. The most common of these is the drywall industry, so commonly used is it, in fact, that a special design, and a name to match, has been put together for them. In Germany they are called Handwerkerstelzen. Or Drywall stilts.

Norfolk Day
The charm of Norfolk is not so readily definable as that of some other counties. It has the ungrudging roominess of a kingdom. It is littered with villages but uncluttered by towns.
Reginald Pound

If you’re one of those living in the great county of Norfolk, then you know that you’re living somewhere that has a history that goes back hundreds of thousands of years. It is thought that this area has been inhabited ever since this ancient find, meaning that today Norfolk has over 300,000 years of human history beneath its soil. Its rugged beauty has led to it being one of the most beloved areas in England, and every year they celebrate its history and distinction through Norfolk Day. As mentioned, the history of Norfolk Day can rightly be said to begin over 300,000 years ago when the first humans walked on the soil that is now known as Norfolk. Since then the world has gone through an ice age, the incursion of the Romans, and various technological advancements. When we say that the area has been inhabited over 300,000 years, it’s important to understand that there are finds in other regions of England that go back as far as 668,000 years, so it’s possible that the area has been inhabited much longer than that. The modern history of Norfolk began in the Roman Era, and from that point forward things have been… interesting… to say the least. It has changed hands many times, been the subject of multiple wars as England formed out of a province of the Roman Empire, became part of the Kingdom of the East Angles, then the Earldom of Harold I of England, and then settled in comfortable as part of England in the Middle Ages. Throughout this period it was one of the most important markets and agrarian areas in the country and is home to a number of English heroes.

Chicken Finger Day
Chicken fingers have been an all-time favourite for people over the past 20 years. As a quick and easy way to enjoy chicken, chicken fingers can have so many varieties in flavour and quality that the possibilities are endless.

Scotch Whisky Day
For countless people around the world, nothing says relaxation after a long hard week like a glass of good whisky. And although drinking in the middle of the week is likely not a good habit to get into, you could probably make an exception just this once, and take the time to appreciate this beloved alcoholic beverage. So are you ready to celebrate? We thought so! The Babylonians of Mesopotamia were likely the first people to distill alcohol as 2nd millennium BC. At the time it is likely that various perfumes and aromatics were most often distilled. The earliest records of the distillation of alcohol for the purpose of drinking date back to 13th century Italy, where harder alcohols were distilled from wine. Soon, the practice of distillation use spread through medieval monasteries and was used largely for medicinal purposes, such as the treatment of smallpox and other illnesses. Distillation spread to the UK in the 15th century, and the first evidence of whisky production in Scotland comes from an entry in the Exchequer Rolls for 1494 where malt is sent “To Friar John Cor, by order of the king, to make aquavitae”, enough to make about 500 bottles. Whisky production later moved out of a monastic setting and into personal homes and farms when King Henry VIII of England dissolved all the monasteries in his country due to his feud with the Pope, causing the monks to find a way to earn a living for themselves. However, the distillation process in those days was much more basic than it is today, and the whisky itself was not allowed to age, meaning it must have tasted much more raw than it does today.

Take Your Houseplant For A Walk Day
Proud plant-owners can show off their leafy friends to the neighbourhood when Take Your Houseplant For A Walk Day rolls around. The idea behind this day is to celebrate plants, and to acquaint plants with their immediate environment, which is supposed to be healthy for them. Plant-owners can admire each others’ plants, and exchange stories and tips on plant-care. For those who find this concept a little strange, there are more conservative ways to get involved. Plants grow throughout their lives, and you can use this day as an excuse to re-pot any plants that might be getting a bit big for their abode. You can take your plant for a walk to a new location within the house, perhaps one where it might get more sun. And if you don’t own a houseplant, there’s no better day to bring one home and introduce it to your family.

A Selection of Birthdays

1518 Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury & builder of country houses, born Derbyshire (d. 1608)
1625 Edward Montagu, 1st Earl of Sandwich, English soldier, admiral and patron to Samuel Pepys, born in Barnwell (d. 1672)
1733 Jeremiah Dixon, English surveyor and astronomer, born in Cockfield, County Durham (d. 1779)
1777 Thomas Campbell, Scottish poet (Hohenlinden, Battle of the Baltic), born in Glasgow (d. 1844)
1784 George Onslow, English-French composer (chamber music), b. Clermont-Ferrand, France (d.1853)
1801 George Biddell Airy, English mathematician and 7th Astronomer Royal, born in Alnwick (d. 1892)
1833 Thomas George Bonney, English geologist, born in Rugeley, (d. 1923)
1849 John Hopkinson, Physicist and electrical engineer (Hopkinson's Law), born Manchester (d. 1898)
1857 E. A. Wallis Budge, Orientalist and museum curator (British Museum), born in Bodmin, (d. 1934)
1882 Donald Crisp, Actor & director (How Green Was My Valley, Pollyana), b. Bow, London (d.1974)
1882 Geoffrey de Havilland, British aircraft designer, born in High Wycombe (d. 1965)
1904 Anton Dolin [Sydney Francis Patrick Chippendall Healey-kay], British dancer (Girl From Petrovka), born in Slinfold, Sussex (d. 1983)
1907 Mollie Doreen Phillips, Figure skater and judge (Olympics 1932,36), born in London (d. 1994)
1908 Hugh Jenkins, Baron Jenkins of Putney, MP of Arts (Labour), born Enfield, Middlesex (d. 2004)
1909 Marcia Anastasia Christoforides, British philanthropist, art collector & racehorse owner, born Sutton Surrey (d. 1994)
1910 Lupita Tovar, Mexican-born actress (Dracula), born in Matías Romero, Mexico (d. 2016)
1911 Rayner Heppenstall, Novelist (The Blaze of Noon), born Lockwood, Huddersfield (d. 1981)
1912 Vernon Elliott, British bassoonist and composer, born in London (d. 1996)
1916 Keenan Wynn, American actor (Dr Strangelove, Absent Minded Professor), born New York (d.1986)
1917 John Cunningham, Royal Air Force night fighter ace (WW II), born Croydon, (d. 2002)
1920 James Munn, Scottish educationalist and commissioner (British University) (d. 2009)
1926 Peter Coker, English painter, born in London (d. 2004)
1929 Jack Higgins [Harry Patterson], Novelist (The Eagle Has Landed), born Newcastle upon Tyne
1930 Shirley Williams, British politician (Social Democratic Party), born in London
1930 Andy White, Scottish drummer, drummed on early Beatles records ("Love Me Do" and "P.S. I Love You"), born in Glasgow (d. 2015)
1935 Billy McCullough, Northern Irish footballer, born in Carrickfergus, Northern Ireland
1937 Anna Dawson, British comedienne (Violet-Keeping Up Appearances), born in Bolton
1937 Robert Gibb, British zoo and theme park creator (Flamingo Land; Pleasure Island), born in England
1939 James McGee, Pathologist & professor (Morbid Anatomy at Oxford), born Mossend, Lanarkshire,
1942 Barbara Ferris, English actress (Nice Girl Like Me), born in London
1942 Bobby Campbell [Thornbury], Scottish journalist and musician, born in Glasgow (d. 1997)
1944 Barbara Thompson, British jazz saxophonist and composer, born in Oxford
1949 Jeremy Thomas, British film producer and actor (Family Life), born in London
1950 Michael Vaughn, English rocker (Paper Lace - "The Night Chicago Died"), born in Sheffield
1950 Simon Jones, English actor and comedian (News is the News), born in Charlton Park, Wiltshire,
1958 Christopher Dean, Ice dancer (Torvill & Dean; Olympic gold 1984), born Calverton, Nottinghamshire
1959 David East, English cricketer, born in London
1960 Jo Durie, English tennis player, born in Bristol
1967 Neil Smith, English cricketer (Warwickshire & England A all-rounder), born in Solihull
1976 Demis Hassabis, British Artificial Intelligence researcher, computer game designer, and neuroscientist, born in London

On this day in British History

1214 1st battle of Bouvines - King Philip II of France vs Holy Roman Emperor Otto IV and King John of England; as a result John lost Normandy and his other possessions in France (hence his nickname John "Lackland")
1586 Walter Raleigh brings the 1st tobacco to England from Virginia
1643 English Military and Political Leader Oliver Cromwell defeats Royalists at Battle of Gainsborough
1661 English Parliament confirms Navigation Act
1663 English Parliament accepts Staple Act
1694 Bank of England granted 12 year charter by Act of Parliament
1714 British Queen Anne dismisses premier Robert Haley
1809 Battle of Talavera: British/Spanish army vs French army
1839 Chartist riots break out in Birmingham, England
1865 Welsh settlers arrive at Chubut in Argentina.
1866 transatlantic telegraph cable successfully in second attempt comes ashore at Heart's Content, Newfoundland laid out by Isambard Kingdom Brunel's Great Eastern steamship (1,686 miles long)
1909 British ship SS Waratah is last seen en-route from Durban to Cape Town; 211 on board are missing and no trace of the ship ever found
1943 772 British bombers attack Hamburg
1944 1st British jet fighter used in combat (Gloster Meteor)
1948 Australia set 404 to win v England at Headingley
1959 Abbas Ali Baig scores 112 for India v England on debut
1975 The British government closes its consulate in Angola following increasing fighting between the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola and South African troops

Scotland

1689 Battle of Killicrankie: Jacobite Scottish Highlanders under Viscount Dundee defeat royalist force under General MacKay

Wales

1865 Welsh settlers arrive in Chubut, Argentina.

Weddings in History
1365 Isabella of England marries Enguerrand of Coucy at Windsort
1927 British WWII Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery (39) weds Elizabeth Carver in Chiswick
1981 British television: On Coronation Street, Ken Barlow marries Deirdre Langton, proving to be a national event with massive viewer numbers

Deaths in History
1770 Robert Dinwiddie, British colonial governor of Virginia (b. 1693)
1844 John Dalton, Chemist, Physicist and Meteorologist who developed the atomic theory of matter and researched colour blindness, dies at 77
1916 Charles Fryatt, British capt of SS Brussels, executed by Germans, dies
1996 Jane Beverly Drew, English modernist architect, dies at 85
Thanked by: Kelantan

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