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Richard Frost
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Wed Jul 28 2021 10:19am

28th July 2021

THE FESTIVAL OF THE POOL / EID UL GHADEER/ EID-UL-GHADIR Muslim (Shi‘a)
This is a festival observed by Shi‘a Muslims, for whom it is an extremely important day. It commemorates an event shortly before the death of the Prophet and his announcement concerning Ali, which they understand to be his clear appointment to be successor to the prophet as the spiritual and temporal leader of Islam.

World Hepatitis Day
World Hepatitis Day (WHD) takes places every year on 28 July bringing the world together under a single theme to raise awareness of the global burden of viral hepatitis and to influence real change. In 2021 the theme is ‘Hepatitis Can’t Wait’. On World Hepatitis Day, 28 July, we call on people from across the world to take action and raise awareness of hepatitis because Hepatitis Can’t Wait.

Milk Chocolate Day
How is milk chocolate different from other chocolates? It’s a mix of cocoa solids and either dry or condensed milk. While dark chocolate is traditionally used as a baking ingredient, this lighter version is used to make chocolate candy bars, hot chocolate, and many other delicious desserts. Did you know that chocolate actually has mood-enhancing benefits? That’s right—chocolate can make you happy! This is due to the fact that it contains a stimulant called theobromine and a compound called anandamide. Now that’s a reason to celebrate! Daniel Peter, the inventor of milk chocolate, was born in the village of Moudon, located in the Canton of Vaud, in beautiful, mountainous Switzerland in 1836. Peter attended school and graduated there. Later on in life, Daniel Peter had formed a strong friendship with his neighbour, Henry Nestle, who had settled in Vevey, Switzerland, about 1843. Nestle had developed a process to make baby food in which he used what was then called a “milky flour.” It was at this point in his life that Daniel Peter asked himself the question, “Why not try to make a chocolate containing milk?” This idea stayed with the young Daniel Peter to the point of becoming an obsession with him. He further realized that in order to stay in the chocolate market, already principally controlled by Caliller, Suchard, Kohler, and others, he must produce a new product that would become pleasing and desired by the consumer. It should be noted by all that since the early 20th century, the countries of Europe have been producing milk chocolate of varying qualities. It should also be understood that the development of the process by Daniel Peter was created in the community of Vevey, with the Canton of Vaud, in Switzerland, and further pointed out that the first chocolate process, although not milk chocolate, was also created in Vevey, Switzerland, by Francois Louis Cailler, at the age of twenty-three, upon his return to that community from France and Italy in 1819.

A Selection of Birthdays

1165 Ibn al-'Arabi, Muslim mystic & philosopher (The Meccan Revelations), born Murcia, Spain (d.1240)
1808 Charles Lucas, Composer, Principal of the Royal Academy of Music, b. Salisbury (d. 1869)
1844 Gerard Manley Hopkins, English poet (Windhover), born in Stratford, London (d. 1889)
1857 Ballington Booth, British-born American officer in The Salvation Army and co-founder of Volunteers of America, born Brighouse (d. 1940)
1866 Beatrix Potter, Children's author & illustrator (The Tale of Peter Rabbit), born London (d.1943)
1900 Maurice Johnstone, English brass band composer, born in Manchester (d. 1976)
1902 Karl Popper, Austro-British philosopher (Logic of Forschung), b. Vienna, Austria-Hungary (d.1994)
1903 Colin Gregory, English tennis player (Australian C'ship 1929, chairman All-England Club, Wimbledon), born Beverley (d. 1959)
1904 Selwyn Lloyd, British politician involved in Suez crisis, born in West Kirby (d. 1978)
1909 Malcolm Lowry, Novelist (Under the Volcano), born New Brighton, Merseyside (d. 1957)
1929 Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, American First Lady (1961-63), b. Southampton, New York (d.1994)
1934 Jacques d'Amboise, American ballet dancer, and choreographer (NYC Ballet Company, 1949-84), actor (Seven Brides For Seven Brothers), and educator (founded National Dance Institute, 1976), born in Dedham Massachusetts (d. 2021)
1935 Cyril Nicholas Henty-Dodd, better known by his stage name Simon Dee, was a British television interviewer and radio disc jockey who hosted a twice-weekly BBC TV chat show, Dee Time, in the late 1960s. After moving to London Weekend Television (LWT) in 1970, he was dropped and his career never recovered. He died of bone cancer in 2009.
1943 Richard Wright, Singer-songwriter (Pink Floyd-Time/Echoes), b. Hatch End, Middlesex (d.2008)
1948 Eric Sweeney, Irish contemporary composer (The Green One), born in Dublin (d. 2020)
1949 Simon Kirke, British rock drummer (Bad Company), born in London
1949 Steve Peregrin Took, English musician (Tyrannosaurus Rex), born London (d. 1980)
1954 Michael "Mikey" Sheehy is an Irish Gaelic football selector and former player. His league and championship career with the Kerry senior team spanned fifteen seasons from 1973 to 1988. Born in Tralee, County Kerry, First played competitive Gaelic football during his schooling at Tralee CBS. He first appeared for the Austin Stacks club at underage levels, before winning an All-Ireland medal with the senior team in 1977. Also won one Munster medal and five county club championship medals. Made his debut on the inter-county scene at sixteen when he was picked on the Kerry minor team. Played two championship seasons with the minors & was a Munster Minor Football Championship runner-up on both occasions. Sheehy subsequently joined the Kerry under-21 team, winning two All-Ireland Under-21 Football Championship medals in 1973 and 1975. By this stage he had also joined the Kerry senior team, making his debut during the 1973-74 league. Over the course of the next fifteen seasons, Sheehy won eight All-Ireland medals, beginning in 1975, followed by a record-equalling four championships in-a-row from 1978 to 1981 and three championships in-a-row from 1984 to 1986. He also won eleven Munster medals, three National Football League medals and was named Footballer of the Year in 1979. He played his last game for Kerry in July 1987. After being chosen on the Munster inter-provincial team for the first time in 1976, Sheehy was an automatic choice on the starting fifteen for the following seven years. During that time he won five Railway Cup medals. In retirement from playing, he became involved in team management and coaching. In 2012 he was appointed as a selector with the Kerry senior team. Since then he has helped steer the team to one All-Ireland title and four successive Munster titles.
Named in the right corner-forward position on the Football Team of the Century in 1984. Sheehy was one of only two players from the modern era to be named on that team. He switched to the left-corner forward position when he was named on the Football Team of the Millennium in 1999. Sheehy also won seven All-Stars, while his tally of eight All-Ireland medals, albeit one as a non-playing substitute, is also a record which he shares with fellow Kerry players Páidí Ó Sé, Pat Spillane and Denis "Ógie" Moran. His scoring tally of 29-205 was a record which stood for 25 years.
1954 Hugo Chávez, President of Venezuela (1998-2013), b. Sabaneta, Barinas State, Venezuela (d.2013)
1971 Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, Leader of Islamic State of Iraq & the Levant (ISIL), b. Samarra, Iraq (d.2019)
1974 Justin Lee Collins British radio & television presenter/actor b. Southmead, Bristol. He began his career as a stand up comedian in the 1990s when he was in his late teens. He then presented a number of TV shows. From 2003 – 2005 he hosted his own radio show on XFM, and was one half of the duo presenting The Sunday Night Project (previously named The Friday Night Project) alongside Alan Carr for Channel 4. He also hosted numerous specials on Channel 4 entitled 'Bring Back...' reuniting the cast and crew from shows and films such as Dallas, Star Wars, The A-Team and Fame. He then took on challenges to become a Mexican Wrestler, a Surfer, a Ballroom Dancer, a Ten Pin Bowler, a High Diver and a West End Star. He later became a West End Star in Rock of Ages. In 2014 starred in the comedy/horror feature film The Hatching alongside Thomas Turgoose and Andrew Potts and in 2015 played a small role in the time travel comedy Time Slips. In 2012 he was convicted of harassing an ex-girlfriend
1981 Michael Carrick, born Wallsend, is a Professional football coach and former player who is currently working as a first-team coach at Manchester United. He is one of the most decorated English footballers of all time and is best known for his 12-year playing career with Manchester United, whom he also captained. He was a central midfielder, & was used as an emergency centre-back under Alex Ferguson, David Moyes, Louis van Gaal and José Mourinho. His playing style was grounded in his passing ability.
Carrick began his career at West Ham United, joining the youth team in 1997 and winning the FA Youth Cup two years later. He was sent on loan twice during his debut season, to Swindon Town and Birmingham City, before securing a place in the first team by the 2000–01 season. He experienced relegation in the 2002–03 season and was voted into the PFA First Division Team of the Year in the following campaign. He made more than 150 appearances for the Hammers, and in 2004, he moved to rival London club Tottenham Hotspur for a fee believed to be £3.5 million. He played an influential role at the club for two seasons before moving to Manchester United in 2006 for £18 million. From his debut onwards, Carrick was a regular in the Manchester United first team, making more than 50 appearances in his first season with them. He established himself as a key member of the team that won the Premier League in 2006–07, their first title success in four years. The following season he was part of the side that won the 2008 Champions League final, playing the full 120 minutes as they enjoyed a 6–5 penalty shootout win, with Carrick converting his spot kick, to help achieve the European Double. As of 2019, he is the only English player alongside former teammate Wayne Rooney to win the Premier League title, FA Cup, UEFA Champions League, League Cup, FA Community Shield, UEFA Europa League and FIFA Club World Cup. In winning the 2016 FA Cup, Carrick completed his collection of every domestic honour in the English game. Carrick has represented England at under-18, under-21, B and senior levels. He made his England debut in 2001 and went on to gain 34 caps without scoring a goal. Carrick was often overlooked during his England career, with many of his contemporaries being preferred in his position. This was the case until the 2012–13 season, when Carrick established himself as a regular. He was a member of the England squad for two major tournaments, the 2006 and 2010 World Cups.
1990 Shana Swash, Actress (EastEnders), born in Camden, London

On this day in British History

1148 Second Crusade: Crusaders abandon their siege of Damascus
1586 Sir Thomas Harriot introduces potatoes to Europe on return to England
1609 Admiral George Somers settles in Bermuda
1790 Henry James Pye appointed as British Poet Laureate by King George III
1886 British government led by Lord Salisbury forms
1914 First Lord of the Admiralty Winston Churchill orders British Grand Fleet to Scapa Flow
1943 Operation Gomorrah: RAF bombing over Hamburg causes a firestorm that kills 42,600 German civilians
1959 United Kingdom starts using postal codes
1964 England all out 611 in reply to Australia's 8-656 Match a draw
1965 Edward Heath becomes leader of the Conservative Party
1967 Pirate Radio Station 390 (Radio Invicta) (England) closes down
2005 A tornado touches down in a residential area in south Birmingham, England, causing £4,000,000 worth of damages and injuring 39 people.

Northern Ireland

2005 The Provisional Irish Republican Army call an end to their thirty year long armed campaign in Northern Ireland

Weddings in History

1540 English King Henry VIII (49) marries Catherine Howard (16 or 17), his 5th wife
1683 Anne Stuart, later the British Queen Anne, marries Prince George of Denmark at the Chapel Royal

Deaths in History

1540 Thomas Cromwell, English chief minister for King Henry VIII, executed for treason and heresy at 54 or 55
1667 Abraham Cowley, English poet (Mistress/Sex libri plantarum), dies
1675 Bulstrode Whitelocke, English lawyer (b. 1605)
1685 Henry Bennet, 1st Earl of Arlington, English statesman (b. 1618)
1762 George Dodington, 1st Baron Melcombe, English politician (b. 1691)
1998 Lenny McLean, English bareknuckle fighter (b. 1949)
2002 Archer John Porter Martin, English chemist and Nobel laureate, dies at 92
2004 Francis Crick, English molecular biologist, Nobel laureate (1962), dies of colon cancer at 88
2005 Ronald MacDonald, British major-general (WWII), dies at 93
2006 David Gemmell, British writer (b. 1948)
2010 Ivy Bean, English internet celebrity (b. 1905)

Richard Frost
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Thu Jul 29 2021 10:50am

29th July 2021

Chili Dog Day
There’s something about the smell of a chili dog that is just amazing, the rich mixture of traditional hot dog with a hearty dollop of chili on top just means the day got that much better. You can find them at fairs, or along the Boulevard, you can find them along the street in major cities everywhere, or even just being prepared in your own kitchen. The only thing better than a chili dog? A chili dog buried under a mountain of melting cheese, because bad things make a great thing better.

International Tiger Day
International Tiger Day has been created so that people around the world can raise awareness for tiger conservation. The aim of the day is to help promote a worldwide system whereby we are dedicated to protecting tigers and their natural habitats. We can also use this day to support tiger conservation issues and to raise awareness. After all, when more people are aware of something, they are going to be more inclined to help, and that is why this day is so important. There are a number of different issues that tigers all around the world face. There are a number of threats that are driving tigers close to extinction, and we can do our bit to make sure that we do not lose these incredible creatures. Some of the threats that tigers face include poaching, conflict with humans, and habitat loss. Poaching and the illegal trade industry is a very worrying one. This is the biggest threat that wild tigers face. Demand for tiger bone, skin, and other body parts is leading to poaching and trafficking. This is having a monumental impact on the sub-populations of tigers, resulting in localized extinctions. We often see tiger skins being used in home décor. Moreover, bones are used for medicines and tonics. This has seen illegal criminal syndicates get involved in the tiger trade in order to make huge profits. It really is a worrying industry. In fact, it is thought to be worth 10 billion dollars per annum in the United States alone. This is why we need to support charities and work hard to put an end to poaching and the illegal trade of tiger parts. While this represents the biggest threats to tigers, there are a number of other threats as well. This includes habitat loss. Throughout the world, tiger habitats have reduced because of access routes, human settlements, timber logging, plantations, and agriculture. In fact, only around seven percent of the historical range of a tiger is still intact today. That is an incredibly small and worrying amount. This can increase the number of conflicts between tigers, as they roam about and try to locate new habitats. Not only this, but genetic diversity can reduce because it can cause there to be inbreeding in small populations.

Rain Day
Depending on where in the world you live, rain may be something that you are very much used to! For some people, they see more rain than sun, and this can cause them to become a bit frustrated by it. After all, no one likes being caught in the middle of a massive downpour, do they? However, there are a lot of reasons why we should love rain! Yes, rain is important for certain industries, but you do not need to be a farmer in order to appreciate rain. Rain can be incredibly soothing. Have you ever laid in bed and listened to the raindrops hitting your window? It is so soothing and relaxing. In fact, a lot of people play audio of raindrops to try and help them get to sleep at night. If you are someone who has trouble sleeping, give it a try! Rain is widely associated with relaxation. How many of you have used a rainy day as the perfect excuse to have a snug and cosy duvet day? Rain also gives us the opportunity to show off our stylish rainwear! However, from a more technical and scientific point of view, rain is a vital part of the water cycle. Rain is vital to all life on Earth. Rainfall represents the main way in which water in the skies comes down to earth, providing drinks for animals and plants, recharging the underground aquifers, and filling our rivers and lakes. When you think about it from this perspective, you see why rain is so critical, and why it is something that should be cherished and celebrated, which is what Rain Day is all about.

Lipstick Day
Seldom has so much controversy surrounded such a small tube. If anything, Lipstick Day is intended to celebrate the prolific and gloriously glossy survival of that little stick of colour that has sometimes been equated to a lethal stick of dynamite. Whether it is seductively adding more pull to a pout, or scrawling a meaningful message on a mirror, lipstick has historically refused to be ignored. Sarah Bernhardt created some epic scandal by applying lip rouge in public and Queen Victoria considered makeup hugely impolite and intended only to mark the most impolite of women. Yet, Winston Churchill found lipstick to be a wonderful morale booster and refused to limit its production during WW11. It seems he shared the secret women (and some men) have known for at least 5,000 years. Lipstick adds colour to character, so flaunt your brightest and make Lipstick Day a huge, marvellously colourful event.

Intern Day
If you know what it is like to apply and work in an internship, you know that it can be a rewarding experience that you can tell stories about to your friends and families. However, because it is an outstanding but unpaid job, many interns expend a lot of time and energy into working for a company all for the sake of experience and degree requirements. That’s why there’s Intern Day! Intern Day is the day that recognizes interns for their efforts and achievements.

A Selection of Birthdays

1796 Walter Hunt, American inventor (safety pin, sewing machine), b. Martinsburg, New York (d.1859)
1801 George Bradshaw, was an English cartographer, printer and publisher. He developed Bradshaw's Guide, a widely sold series of combined railway guides and timetables. born in Manchester (d.1853)
1835 Joe Coburn, Irish boxer (Heavyweight C'ship of America 1863-65), born in Middletown County, Armagh, Ireland (d. 1890)
1883 Benito Mussolini [Il Duce], Fascist Italian dictator (1922-43), born Predappio, Forlì, Italy (d.1945)
1897 General Sir Neil Methuen Ritchie, GBE, KCB, DSO, MC, KStJ was a British Army officer who saw service during both the world wars. He is most notable during the Second World War for commanding the British Eighth Army in the North African campaign from November 1941 until being dismissed in June 1942. Despite this, his career did not end. Richie later commanded XII Corps throughout the campaign in Northwest Europe, from June 1944 until Victory in Europe Day (VE Day) in May 1945. (d. 1983)
1905 Dag Hammarskjöld, Swedish public servant, 2nd Secretary-General of the United Nations (1953-61) and posthumous Nobel Peace Prize winner (1961), born in Jönköping, Sweden (d. 1961)
1910 Henry Brian Boyne, journalist, Political Correspondent, The Daily Telegraph, 1956–76" (d.1997)
1921 Aled Eames, Welsh maritime historian, born in Llandudno (d. 1996)
1923 Jim Marshall, British business man and electric guitar amplifier pioneer known as "The Father of Loud", born Acton, West London (d, 2012)
1924 Lloyd Bochner, Canadian actor (Point Blank, Dynasty, Batman), born in Toronto, Ontario (d. 2005)
1941 David Warner, English actor (Star Trek VI, Time Bandits), born in Manchester
1946 Diane Keen, English actress (The Cuckoo Waltz, Doctors), born in London
1947 Lenny Zakatek [du Platel], Indian-English rock singer (Alan Parsons Project; Gonzalez), born in Karachi, British India
1949 Marilyn Tucker Quayle, novelist/wife of Vice President Dan Quayle (1989-93)
1952 Joe Johnson, Snooker player (World Champion, 1986: Senior Masters, 2019), born Bradford,
1959 John Sykes, English rock guitarist and singer (Thin Lizzy; Blue Murder), born in Reading
1963 Graham Poll, is an English former football referee in the Premier League and is considered the best English referee of the last 25 years in a list maintained by the International Federation of Football History and Statistics (IFFHS). With 26 years of experience, he was regarded as one of the most prominent referees in the Premier League, often taking charge of the highest-profile games. His final domestic game in a career spanning 1,544 matches was the Championship play-off final on 28 May 2007 between Derby County and West Bromwich Albion. As well as refereeing the 2005 UEFA Cup Final he was the English representative at two World Cups and UEFA Euro 2000. At the 2006 FIFA World Cup in Germany, he refereed two matches successfully. In his third game, Croatia vs Australia, he cautioned Croatian defender Josip Šimunić three times before sending him off. Poll retired from refereeing international tournament finals matches shortly after, citing his error in the match. He continued to referee in the Premier League, Champions League and on international games, but said he would not allow himself to be nominated to represent the FA at any tournament finals as he felt he had his chance
1963 James Martin Beglin, or simply Jim Beglin, is an Irish former professional footballer and current co-commentator for RTÉ, CBS Sports, BT Sport, and Premier League Productions.
1966 Sally Jane Janet Gunnell OBE DL (born 29 July 1966) is a British former track and field athlete who won the 1992 Olympic gold medal in the 400 metres hurdles. She is the only female British athlete to have won Olympic, World, European and Commonwealth titles, and was the first female 400 metres hurdler in history to win the Olympic and World titles and break the world record. Her former world record time of 52.74 secs in 1993, remained in the world all-time top ten until 2021 and is the current British record. She was made an MBE in 1993 and an OBE in 1998.
1972 Wil Wheaton, American actor (Star Trek Next Generation-Wesley, Stand By Me), born in Burbank, California

On this Day in British History

1588 The Battle of Gravelines - Spanish Armada damaged and scattered by the English fleet
1588 Duke Farneses troops ready for invasion of England
1907 Sir Robert Baden-Powell forms Boy Scouts in England
1914 British fleet leaves Portland/passes Straits of Dover
1930 Airship R100, 1st passenger-carrying flight from England to Canada
1978 American Penny Dean swims English Channel in record 7 hrs, 40 min; record holds until 1995

Ireland

1848 Irish Potato Famine: Tipperary Revolt - an unsuccessful nationalist revolt against British rule put down by police

Scotland

1567 James VI is crowned King of Scots at Stirling

Wales

2018 Tour de France: Geraint Thomas becomes the first Welshman and only 3rd Briton to win the Tour; beats Dutchman Tom Dumoulin by 1' 51"; Peter Sagan wins green points jersey

Weddings in History

1565 Mary, Queen of Scots marries her cousin, Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley
1914 Mountain climber George Mallory (28) weds Ruth Dixon Turner
1981 His Royal Highness Charles, Prince of Wales weds Lady Diana Spencer at St Paul's Cathedral

Deaths in History

1573 John Caius, English physician, dies at 62
1752 Peter Warren, British admiral
1833 William Wilberforce, English abolitionist, dies at 73
1857 Thomas Dick, Scottish scientific teacher and writer (b. 1774)
1982 Richard Gale, English general and airborne commander (Normandy), dies at 86
1992-07-29 William Mathias, Welsh composer (wrote for 1981 royal wedding), dies at 57
1994 Dorothy Hodgkin, British chemist who developed protein crystallography, 3rd woman to win a Nobel Prize (1964), dies of a stroke at 84
2008 Eric Varley, British politician and cabinet minister, dies at 75

Richard Frost
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Fri Jul 30 2021 11:11am

30th July 2021

International Day of Friendship
The International Day of Friendship was proclaimed in 2011 by the UN General Assembly with the idea that friendship between peoples, countries, cultures and individuals can inspire peace efforts and build bridges between communities. The resolution places emphasis on involving young people, as future leaders, in community activities that include different cultures and promote international understanding and respect for diversity. To mark the International Day of Friendship the UN encourages governments, international organizations and civil society groups to hold events, activities and initiatives that contribute to the efforts of the international community towards promoting a dialogue among civilizations, solidarity, mutual understanding and reconciliation. The International Day of Friendship is an initiative that follows on the proposal made by UNESCO defining the Culture of Peace as a set of values, attitudes and behaviours that reject violence and endeavour to prevent conflicts by addressing their root causes with a view to solving problems. It was then adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1997.

World Day against Trafficking in Persons
Trafficking in persons is a serious crime and a grave violation of human rights. Every year, thousands of men, women and children fall into the hands of traffickers, in their own countries and abroad. Almost every country in the world is affected by trafficking, whether as a country of origin, transit or destination for victims. UNODC, as guardian of the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (UNTOC) and the Protocols thereto, assists States in their efforts to implement the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons (Trafficking in Persons Protocol). The Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons defines Trafficking in Persons as the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation. Exploitation shall include, at a minimum, the exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labour or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organs. The World Day against Trafficking in Persons was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly, in its resolution A/RES/68/192.

Cheesecake Day
Cheesecake Day is one of the creamiest days of the year! It’s a day to indulge in the decadence of this dessert, and sample some of the tastiest flavours. From the humble plain baked to the tangy key lime or maybe a chocolate one would hit the spot. Whatever grabs that sweet tooth it is certain that today is the day for some cheesecake!

Talk In An Elevator Day
We all know about that awkward silence, the one that ensues when you’re suddenly in a small room with 5-10 other people you don’t know. Politeness seems to indicate that the people around you are sworn to silence, that perhaps it’s rude to break the sacred silence that is the lift ride. Talk In An Elevator Day tells us to break that silence, and maybe make a new friend or business acquaintance on the lift. Who knows what can come of just speaking up and introducing yourself?

Paperback Book Day
Time was that books were sold bound in heavy wooden covers bound in leather and stitched to a spine, these books are durable and attractive, but they are also very… very… heavy. In the 19th century another technique of improving the printing and publishing of books came about, the paperback novel.
These books were easily portable, less expensive to produce, and provided a beautiful way to carry about one’s favourite book on their person. Paperback Book Day celebrates the creation of this new form of book, and the people who carry them around every day.

A Selection of Birthdays

1763 Samuel Rogers, English poet (Italy, a poem), born in Islington, London (d. 1855)
1818 Emily Brontë, English novelist (Wuthering Heights), born in Thornton, West Yorkshire (d. 1848)
1859 Henry Lunn, English humanitarian and religious leader, born in Horncastle, Lincolnshire (d. 1939)
1859 Henry Louis Smith, American physicist who made the first X-ray photograph, born in Greensboro, North Carolina (d. 1951)
1863 Henry Ford, American industrialist and auto maker (Ford Model T), born in Dearborn Township, Michigan (d. 1947)
1875 James W. Tate, English composer, born in Wolverhampton (d. 1922)
1882 Holmes Herbert, British actor (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The Kiss), born in Mansfield (d. 1956)
1898 Henry Moore, English artist and sculptor (known for Three Piece Sculpture: Vertebrae), born in Castleford (d. 1986)
1899 Gerald Moore, English pianist (Am I Too Loud), born in Watford, Hertfordshire (d. 1987)
1909 C. Northcote Parkinson, English historian (Pursuit of Progress), born in Barnard Castle (d. 1993)
1916 Dick Wilson, British-American actor, born in Preston (d. 2007)
1917 Eddy Grove, American actor (Dragnet, The Silent Service, Medic), born in NYC, New York (d. 1995)
1924 Christopher Shaw, British composer, born in London (d. 1995)
1926 Peter Trevenen Thwaites, British Brigadier General and playwright (Love or money) (d. 1991)
1927 Richard Johnson, British stage and screen actor and producer (Never So Few, Restless, Beyond the Door), born in Upminster (d. 2015)
1938 Terry O'Neill, British fashion and celebrity photographer, born in Romford, Essex (d. 2019)
1940 Clive Sinclair, British computer inventor (ZX Spectrum), born in Richmond, Surrey
1944 Frances de la Tour, English actress (Bejeweled, Wombling Free), born in Bovingdon, Hertfordshire,
1944 Teresa Cahill, British soprano opera singer, born in Maidenhead, Berkshire
1946 Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond, English rock bassist (Jethro Tull), born in Blackpool
1947 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Austrian-American body builder, actor (Terminator) and politician (38th Governor of California), born in Thal, Austria
1947 Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, French virologist (Nobel Prize 2008, discovered HIV), born in Paris
1955 Rat Scabies [Chris Miller], British rock drummer (the Damned), born in Surrey
1956 Phil Fearon, English rocker (Galaxy, Kandidate-I Don't Want to Lose You), born in London
1958 Daley Thompson, British decathlete (Olympic gold 1980, 84), born in London
1958 Kate Bush, English singer-songwriter (Running Up That Hill, Wuthering Heights), born in Bexleyheath, Kent
1962 Andy Green, Royal Air Force & 1st to break sound barrier on land, b. Atherstone, Warwickshire,
1965 Tex [Anthony] Axile, English rocker (Transvision Vamp-Velveteen), born in Crawley
1965 Tim Munton, English cricket fast bowler (2 Tests; Warwickshire), born in Melton Mowbray,
1968 Sean Moore, Welsh drummer (Manic Street Preachers), born in Pontypool
1970 Christopher Nolan, English film director (Inception, Interstellar), born in London
1974 Jason Robinson, English dual-code rugby player, born in Leeds
1975 Graham Nicholls, English artist, born in London, United Kingdom
1979 Graeme McDowell, Irish golfer (US Open 2010), born in Portrush, Northern Ireland
1980 Justin Rose, English golfer (US Open 2013), born in Johannesburg, South Africa
1982 Jimmy Anderson, English cricket fast bowler (most wickets for England in both Test and ODI cricket), born in Burnley
1983 Seán Dillon, Irish footballer, born in Dublin, Ireland

On this day in British History

1646 English parliament sets king Charles I Newcastle Propositions
1678 English troops land in Flanders
1775 Captain James Cook with Resolution returns to England
1809 British armed force of 39,000 lands in Walcheren
1836 First English language newspaper published in Hawaii
1900 British Parliament passes several progressive social acts: a Mines Act, a Workmen's Compensation Act and a Railway Act
1914 John French appointed British supreme commander
1949 British warship HMS Amethyst escapes down Yangtze River, having been refused a safe passage by Chinese Communists after 3-month standoff
1963 British spy Kim Philby found in Moscow
1980 Vanuatu (New Hebrides) gains independence from Britain & France

Northern Ireland

1970 Riots hit Belfast, North Ireland
1976 4 Protestant civilians were shot dead at a pub off Milltown Road, Belfast; the attack was claimed by the Republican Action Force

Weddings in History

2011 Granddaughter of Queen Elizabeth II and British equestrian Zara Phillips (30) weds England rugby player Mike Tindall (32) at the Canongate Kirk in Edinburgh

Deaths in History
1540 Robert Barnes, English churchman (martyred) (b. 1495)
1540 Thomas Abel, English priest (martyred)
1550 Thomas Wriothesley, 1st Earl of Southampton, English politician (b. 1505)
1718 William Penn, Philosopher, Quaker and founder of Pennsylvania (No cross, no crown), dies at 73
1771 Thomas Gray, English poet, dies at 54
1990 Ian Gow, British Conservative parliament leader, murdered
1994 Enid Balint-Edmonds, British psychoanalyst, dies at 90
1994 Henry Mackie, designer of the Belfast Calorimeter, dies at 73
2005 Anthony Walker, English hate crime murder victim (b. 1987)
2008 Anne Armstrong U.S. ambassador to Britain and first female counsel to the President, dies at 80

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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Sat Jul 31 2021 10:31am

Sat Jul 31st, 2021

Raspberry Cake Day
Raspberries are a fruit that is undeniably unique among the wide variety of fruits out in the world; with a sweet tartness and a seedy interior, raspberries make desserts a different experience entirely. Raspberry Cake Day celebrates just one example of the sweet concoctions that is delightful to experience. Today, we’re celebrating the history of raspberries, cakes, and their fantastically sweet combination that’ll make your taste buds ecstatic!

Uncommon Instrument Awareness Day
The history of Uncommon Instrument Awareness Day is really just the history of the many types of instruments in the world today, and the less commonly known producers of that music. There are hundreds of instruments you’ve likely never heard of, things like the contrabass balalaika, easily the least unusual of the instruments you can research. It has a large triangular body and is either played with the fingers or leather plectrums. Another odd type of instrument is the American Fotoplayer, a specific form of player piano that was designed to play out the sound effects during the 19th centuries silent movies. One of our personal favourite unique forms of instruments is the armonica, also known as the ‘bowl organ’ or ‘hydrocrystalophone’. It is an instrument comprised of glass bowls of varying sizes that produce different notes when friction is applied. Think of it as an automated crystal wine glass player. These are just some of the amazing Uncommon Instruments that you can learn about, and they come from a long history of musical tradition in various parts of the world.

World Ranger Day
Around the globe, park rangers are on the front line in the fight to protect our natural heritage. World Ranger Day offers a chance to support their vital work, which ranges from environmental campaigning to education. The day is also an opportunity to pay tribute to rangers who have lost their lives in the line of duty. It’s estimated there are more than 100,000 reserves, parks and protected areas around the world. World Ranger Day was created by the International Ranger Federation and was first held in 2007.
Many mistakenly think America’s Yellowstone National Park is the oldest national park in the world, but there’s one that is over 100 years older. Established by the Mongolian government in 1778, the area surrounding Bogd Khan Uul Mountain is the oldest national park in the world. Many events are being staged around the world, including guided walks and screenings of the documentary The Thin Green Line.

A Selection of Birthdays

1718 John Canton, English physicist, born in Stroud, Gloucestershire (d. 1772)
1737 Princess Augusta Frederica of Great Britain, born in London (d. 1813)
1808 Frederick Crouch, English-born composer, born in London (d. 1896)
1858 Richard Dixon Oldham, British geologist, born in Dublin, Ireland (d. 1936)
1893 Charles Wilfred Orr, English pianist and composer (settings of A.E. Housman poems), born in Cheltenham (d. 1976)
1894 Fred Keenor, Welsh footballer, born in Cardiff, Wales (d. 1972)
1902 Sir G O "Gubby" Allen, English cricket all-rounder (25 Tests; refused to bowl 'Bodyline' tactics 1932), born in Sydney, Australia (d. 1989)
1914 Raymond Aubrac, French resistance leader, born in Paris, France (d. 2012)
1916 Sydney Tafler, actor (Too Many Crooks), born in London, England
1919 Norman Del Mar, British conductor and writer (Conducting Brahms), born in London (d. 1994)
1921 Peter Benenson, British founder of Amnesty International, born in London (d. 2005)
1929 Lynne Reid Banks, British author (The Indian in the Cupboard), born in London
1939 Roger Prideaux, English cricketer (England batsman in 3 Tests 1968-69), born in Chelsea, London
1947 Richard Griffiths, British actor (Withnail & I, Harry Potter), born in Thornaby-on-Tees
1947 Karl Green, English rock bassist (Herman's Hermits - "Mrs. Brown You Have A Lovely Daughter"), born in Salford
1947 Ian Beck, British children's illustrator and author, who illustrated Elton John's "Goodbye Yellow Brick Road" album cover, born in Brighton
1951 Evonne Goolagong Cawley, Tennis player (7 Grand Slam singles titles), born in Barellan, NSW
1953 Hugh McDowell, British cellist (Electric Light Orchestra), born in Hampstead, London (d. 2018)
1957 Daniel Ash, British musician (Bauhaus), born in Northampton
1963 Norman Cook [Fatboy Slim], English musician and record producer (Housemartins, Fatboy Slim), born in Bromley, Kent
1963 Denise Johnson, British rock and soul singer (Primal Scream - "Don’t Fight It, Feel It"), and songwriter (Where Does It Go) born in Manchester (d. 2020)
1964 Jim Corr, Irish singer and musician (The Corrs), born in Dundalk
1965 J. K. Rowling, English writer (Harry Potter novels), born in Yate, Gloucestershire
1965 Julian Richards, British film director (Queen Sacrifice), born in Newport
1966 Marina V A Mowatt [Ogilvy], daughter of English princess Alexandra
1974 Emilia Fox, English actress (The Pianist), born in London
1975 Simon Hirst, British radio DJ now Stephanie, hosted a breakfast show on Capital FM Yorkshire and Vinyl Heaven on Gold until 2014. At the Radio Festival which took place at The British Library in London on 26 October 2016, she was awarded a 'Fellowship', the highest honour The Radio Academy may confer upon a member of the radio industry, to recognise her outstanding contribution to British radio and the industry. In April 2018, Hirst began hosting her first, solo, daily radio show since leaving Capital in 2014. The Stephanie Hirst Show broadcast on BBC Radio Leeds. She also is a trustee of The Radio Academy and chair of the Student Radio Awards sponsored by BBC Radio 1 and Global Radio.
1978 Will Champion, English musician (drummer for Coldplay), born in Southampton
1978 Justin Wilson, English auto racer (International Formula 3000 C'ship; Champ Car Series 4 wins), born in Sheffield (d. 2015)
1980 Harry Potter, fictional character portrayed by Daniel Radcliffe, born in Godric's Hollow, England
1983 Yola [Yolanda Quartey], British folk-roots-country-soul singer, and songwriter ("Walk Through Fire"), born in Bristol

On this day in British History

1423 Hundred Years' War: Battle of Cravant - the French army is defeated by the English on the banks of the river Yonne in Burgundy
1620 Pilgrim Fathers depart Leiden, Netherlands for England on their way to America
1667 Peace of Breda: 2nd English war-Suriname vs New-Netherlands ends
1703 Daniel Defoe is placed in a pillory for the crime of seditious libel after publishing a politically satirical pamphlet, but is pelted with flowers
1813 British invade Plattsburgh, NY
1879 The first cable connection between South Africa and Europe is laid by the British electrical engineer Charles Tilston Bright as part of his project to link the British Empire with growing telecommunications technologies
1965 Cigarette advertising banned on British TV
2016 “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child", a play by Jack Thorne with contributions by J. K. Rowling is published worldwide at midnight

Northern Ireland

1970 Daniel O'Hagan (19), a Catholic civilian, is shot dead by the British Army during a serious riot in the New Lodge Road area of Belfast, Northern Ireland
1972 Operation Motorman: the British Army use 12,000 soldiers supported by tanks and bulldozers to re-take the "no-go areas" controlled by the Provisional Irish Republican Army
1972 Claudy bombing: nine civilians were killed when three car bombs exploded in County Londonderry, North Ireland; no group has since claimed responsibility
2007 Operation Banner, the presence of the British Army in Northern Ireland, and longest-running British Army operation ever, comes to an end

Scotland

1786 "Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish dialect" by Robert Burns is published by John Wilson in Kilmarnock,

Wales

1737 Prince Frederick of Wales escapes English court

Deaths in History

1913 John Milne, Geologist (developed the first modern seismograph), dies of Bright's disease at 62
1917 Hedd Wyn, Welsh poet (b. 1887) killed on the first day of the Battle of Passchendaele during World War I. He was posthumously awarded the bard's chair at the 1917 National Eisteddfod.
1942 Francis Younghusband, Journalist and explorer (1904 British expedition to Tibet), dies at 79
1996 Joan Warburton, Scottish painter, dies at 76

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Re: On this day

Post by macliam » Sat Jul 31 2021 12:05pm

Richard Frost wrote:
Thu Jul 29 2021 10:50am
29th July 2021
.
.
Ireland

1848 Irish Potato Famine: Tipperary Revolt - an unsuccessful nationalist revolt against British rule put down by police
.
.
Sorry, missed this :oops:

The "Warhouse" where the 1848 action took place was just a couple of miles from the factory I ran in the late '70s. The rebels, the "Young Irelanders", called upon a unit of armed RIC police to surrender, but were fired upon during the negotiations. They then chased the RIC into the "Warhouse", where the police held the owners hostage in order to prevent the rebels entering. The rebels then laid siege until a much larger force of armed police arrived. This was a fairly minor incident except for a few intresting things....

1) The "Young Irelander" leaders, William Smith O'Brien, Thomas Francis Meagher and Richard O'Gorman had been to Paris to congratulate the new French Republic and Meagher returned to Ireland with a new tricolour flag based on the French design. This was the first time the current national flag was seen and depicted reconciliation between the Green of Catholic Ireland with the Orange of Protestant Ireland.

2) Meagher was exiled to Tasmania, but escaped to the USA, where he became a Brigadier General in the Union Army and raised the Irish Brigade, causing a bond between the Unionists and the Irish cause. After the war he was made Secretary of the new Territory of Montana.

3) Another leader, John O'Mahony fled to the continent to avoid arrest and then on to the USA where he founded the Fenian Brotherhood in 1858. Returning to Ireland, he then founded the Irish counterpart, the Irish Republican Brotherhood - which was the driving force behind the rebellion in 1916.

So, an unsuccessful revolt had quite large consequences....
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Sun Aug 01 2021 10:55am

1st August 2021

LAMMAS/LUGHNASDH Wiccan LUGHNASADH Pagan
Lughnasadh, otherwise called Lammas, is the time of the corn harvest, when Pagans reap those things they have sown and when they celebrate the fruits of the mystery of Nature. At Lughnasadh, Pagans give thanks for the bounty of the Goddess as Queen of the Land.

Sisters Day
Whether it is in the closest of bonds or the farthest of distances between us, our family is some of the closest ties many of us have outside of marriage and children. This day is to celebrate one of those very bonds, one that has sparked many stories, movies, and songs; the bond of sisterhood. So here’s to you, all the sisters out there that cared for us, helped us and even helped shape us into who we are today!

World Wide Web Day
There is no denying the importance of the World Wide Web. In fact, most people rely on the World Wide Web in order to find out information and carry out tasks online every day. It is integral to a lot of jobs as well. Therefore, it is only right that we have a day to celebrate the World Wide Web. Have you ever found yourself saying “where would I be without the Internet?” – This is something that a lot of people remark all of the time! This is especially the case when you have an unexpected Internet outage and you can’t get online. You don’t know what to do with yourself. The World Wide Web has made it possible to do so many things that were simply not achievable before. This includes catching up with friends and family members that live on the other side of the world, as well as finding out information about virtually any topic! It really is quite remarkable to think about the power that the Internet has today and how it has enriched our lives in so many different ways. If you do some digging online, you will see that there are some really interesting facts about the World Wide Web, and you can spend some of your day finding out more about these. It is incredibly insightful! For example, you can take a look at the first-ever image that was posted on the World Wide Web. This was uploaded in 1992 by Berners-Lee. It was a photo of Les Horribles Cernettes, which is a parody pop band that was founded by employees at CERN. You have also probably used the term “surfing the net” a lot. Did you know that this was created by a librarian called Jean Armour Polly? She is credited with coining the term. This was as a consequence of an article she published called “Surfing the Internet” in March of 1992. This article was published in the Wilson Library Bulletin at the University of Minnesota.

Here are some other facts that you may not know about the World Wide Web…

The first computer used by Sir Tim Berners-Lee as a web server was a NeXT computer.
This computer was also used to write the first web browser, WorldWideWeb.
It was announced that the Web would be free to anyone in 1993.
The launch of the Mosaic web browser in 1993 was a major turning point for the Web. It is credited with popularizing the whole thing.
While the first popular search engine is known as Yahoo! Search, it is believed that Archie was the first of its kind. This was the first tool for FTP archive indexing, enabling people to locate specific files.

Girl Friends Day
Let us begin with what Girl Friend’s Day is – the day of the girl friend. A girl, well that definition is well and obvious for the most part. Occasional bending of that term may apply, but we all know what it means for each of us. A friend is a person to whom one knows and with whom one has a bond of mutual affection. That doesn’t mean sexual relations, just relations. We all have relations, and a friend is one who has a close relationship with us, no matter the context, it is that relationship that details them as a friend. On August 1, 2004, Mistress Susan created a special day just for girl friends to express gratitude to one another. It’s a great chance to take your girl friends to go to the park, to a play, out to eat at a restaurant, a movie, or an upscale spa, perhaps!

Planner Day
Planner people, know that there’s nothing as satisfying, nothing that brings such a sense of security, as having our day neatly planned out in our calendars. When something comes up we can avoid double-booking, we don’t have to worry about forgetting important dates or appointments, and we just know that everything is right where it belongs. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that those who use planners are truly organized individuals. Instead, the use of a Planner is often a way to compensate for the fact that we are messy, disorganized people who need a place to put our lives in order. Planners are used by everyone from stay-at-home parents to important corporate executives who would be lost without a carefully planned itinerary to see them through their day. They also come in every shape and size, and some people keep separate personal and business planners so their two lives can remain separate. Some planners are so serious about planning that they hire people to keep track of their planners for them! That’s some next level planning!

Respect For Parents Day
Respect for Parents Day is the perfect starting point to teach your children about respect and bring more of it into your home. To appreciate all parents in all parts of the world for their selfless commitment to children and their lifelong sacrifice towards nurturing this relationship. Many believe that the day might have originated because of the eternal human desire to honour and appreciate the love and care of parents, whose enormous effort resulted in giving a better human kind to the nation.
Many organizations, local government and other communities encourage Parents’ Day by organizing various activities and games. For example the Parents’ Day Council of the local bodies nominates parents for the “Parents of the Year”. The ideal parents of each area are nominated for the award “National Parents of the Year”.

A Selection of Birthdays

10 BC Claudius, Roman Emperor (41-54), born in Lugdunum, Gaul (d. 54AD)
126 Publius Helvius Pertinax, Roman Emperor (Year of the Five Emperors), born in Alba Pompeia, Italia (d. 193)
1545 Andrew Melville, Scottish theologian and religious reformer, born Baldovie, Angus (d. 1622)
1555 Edward Kelley, British spirit medium and Renaissance occultist, born Worcester (d. 1597)
1714 Richard Wilson, Welsh landscape painter, born in Penegoes, Montgomeryshire (d. 1782)
1766 Jeffry Wyatville, English architect and garden designer (alterations and extensions to Chatsworth House and Windsor Castle), born Burton upon Trent (d. 1840)
1770 William Clark, American explorer, soldier, Indian agent and territorial governor who led the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1804-06 and claimed the Pacific Northwest for the United States, born in Ladysmith, Virginia (d. 1838)
1779 Francis Scott Key, American lawyer, poet and composer of the lyrics to "Star-Spangled Banner", born in Carroll County, Maryland (d. 1843)
1824 Edward Francis Fitzwilliam, English composer, born in Deal, Kent (d. 1857)
1862 M. R. James, English scholar and author (Ghost Stories of an Antiquary), born in Goodnestone, Dover (d. 1936)
1870 Ilya Ivanovich Ivanov, Russian biologist who perfected the artificial insemination of animals and showed that his technology allowed one stallion to fertilize up to 500 mares, born in Shchigry, Kursk Oblast, Russia (d. 1932)
1877 Charlotte Hughes, British supercentenarian (lived under the rule of 6 monarchs and 24 British Prime Ministers), born in Middlesbrough (d. 1993)
1881 Rose Macaulay, English writer (The Towers of Trebizond), born in Rugby, Warwickshire (d. 1958)
1902 Ruth Evelyn Mansfield, doctor, Pregnant with her first child when she qualified, Dr Mansfield spent the next few years focused on her family, starting her anaesthetic career working as house anaesthetist at the Westminster from 1933 to 1936, and inspired to continue in the specialty by Ivan Magill. She then became honorary anaesthetist to Battersea General Hospital, house anaesthetist at the Royal Dental Hospital, and anaesthetist to the British Dental Hospital. During WW2 she worked at the Croydon & Battersea, Royal Waterloo Women & Children’s, British Dental and Brompton Hospitals, and later at Horton EMS Hospital. With the inception of the NHS she became consultant at the Brompton, Milford Chest, King George V (Godalming), and King Edward VII (Midhurst), Hospitals, contributing to the management of the latter there, and retiring in 1967.(d. 1994)
1919 Stanley Middleton, Novelist (Holiday, Three Wise Men), born Bulwell, Nottinghamshire (d.2009)
1920 Jeffrey Segal, British actor and playwright (Dad's Army, Traitors), born London (d. 2015)
1922 Frank Hauser, British theatrical director (Oxford Playhouse), born in Cardiff (d. 2007)
1927 Franklyn Perring, Botanist (co-author of Atlas of the British Flora, 1962), born London (d. 2003)
1930 Lionel Bart [Begleiter], British pop music composer and writer (Oliver!), born in London
1931 Monty Seymour Losowsky, British physician and medical educator, born in the East End of London, the son of immigrant parents, who today would probably be classed as illegal immigrants, fleeing from antisemitic persecution in eastern Europe. He played a crucial role in the establishment of the largest teaching hospital in Europe, St James’s in Leeds, (d. 2020)
1931 Seán Ó Riada [John Reidy], Irish composer (Mise Éire), born in Cork City (d. 1971)
1933 Richard Lloyd Jones, British secretary (Welsh Office 1985–93)
1935 Geoff Pullar, English cricketer (England opening batsman late 50's early 60's), born Swinton, Lancashire (d. 2014)
1936 Laurie Taylor, English sociologist and broadcaster (BBC Radio 4), born in Liverpool
1936 Yves Saint Laurent, French fashion designer, born in Oran, French Algeria (d. 2008)
1938 Paddy Moloney, Irish musician, composer and producer (The Chieftains), born in Donnycarney,
1940 Mervyn Kitchen, English cricketer and umpire, born in Nailsea, Somerset
1943 Dennis "Denny" Cordell, British rock music and record producer (The Moody Blues, Leon Russell), born in Buenos Aires, Argentina (d. 1995)
1943 Geoffrey Britton, British rock drummer (Paul McCartney & Wings), born Lewisham London
1946 Raymond "Boz" Burrell, British rock musician (King Crimson, Bad Company), born in Holbeach, Lincolnshire (d. 2006)
1947 Chris Barnard, Welsh footballer, born in Cardiff, a midfielder, began his career as an apprentice at Southend United, turning professional in August 1965 and playing 8 times in the league the following season (4 as substitute). In July 1966 he moved to Ipswich Town on a free transfer, but failed to win a regular place at Portman Road, appearing only 21 times in the league in 4 years. In October 1970, Torquay United paid £8,000 for his services, some of which was repaid in January 1971 when he scored twice as the Gulls came from 3-0 down to beat Lincoln City 4–3 in the FA Cup. In January 1972, after 32 league games (3 goals) for the Gulls, he moved to Charlton Athletic on a free transfer, but made only one substitute appearance before leaving. He finished his career with non-league side Chelmsford City
1949 Nigel Finch, English TV director and film-maker, born in Tenterden, Kent (d. 1995)
1951 David Jasper, British theologian (University of Glasgow)
1958 Adrian Dunbar, Northern Irish actor (Hear My Song), born in Enniskillen, County Fermanagh,
1959 Joe Elliott, English heavy metal vocalist (Def Leppard-Hysteria, Rock of Ages), born in Sheffield,
1960 Micheál Martin, Irish politician, Prime Minister of Ireland (2020-), born in Cork, Ireland
1961 Mike Watkinson, English cricketer (England off-spinner all-rounder v WI 1995), born in Westhoughton, Lancashire
1963 Amber Rudd, British politician, Home Secretary (2016-18), born in London
1964 Nick Christian Sayer, British rocker (Transvision Vamp-Velveteen)
1965 Sam Mendes, British stage and film director, born in Reading, Berkshire
1969 Graham Thorpe, Cricketer (England LHB Century on Test debut 1993), born Farnham, Surrey,
1970 David James, English footballer, born in Welwyn Garden City, James grew up supporting Luton Town. He signed as a trainee with Luton's local rivals Watford upon leaving school, and was first selected for the club's senior team in 1989. In his days as a youth player, he helped Watford win the FA Youth Cup. Following the departure of Tony Coton, James made his league debut on 25 August 1990 in a 1–2 defeat against Millwall, and his performance resulted in an England U21 call-up for a match against the Republic of Ireland. He earned a total of ten caps for the U21s. At club level, James made 89 first-team appearances for Watford, and was named the club's Player of the Season for the 1990–91 season, when he kept goal in all 46 Second Division games as Watford escaped relegation. He was signed for £1.25m by Liverpool on 6 July 1992. In 2008, James was inducted into the Watford Hall of Fame for his services to the club. James made his Liverpool debut on 16 August 1992 in a 0–1 league defeat to Nottingham Forest. After conceding twenty goals in eleven matches in the first half of the 1993–94, he was dropped in favour of veteran Bruce Grobbelaar, but was recalled to the starting line-up and kept his first clean sheet of the season in a 1–0 away win over Arsenal on 31 January 1993, which included a penalty save from Paul Merson. He also received a runners-up medal in 1996 in the FA Cup while being on the losing side against Manchester United.
1978 Dhani Harrison, British musician (Brainwashed), born in Windsor
1979 Honeysuckle Weeks, Welsh actress (Foyle's War), born in Cardiff, Glamorgan
1981 Stephen Hunt, Irish retired international footballer, born in Port Laoise, Ireland, Played as a winger. He played for Crystal Palace, Brentford, Reading, Hull City, Wolverhampton Wanderers, Ipswich Town and Coventry City
1986 Andrew Taylor, Footballer (Bolton Wanderers), He has previously played for Cardiff City, Middlesbrough, Bradford City, Watford and Wigan Athletic. born in Hartlepool

On this day in British History

1485 Henry Tudor's army sails to England (future Henry VII)
1714 Monarch Georg Ludwig becomes King George I of England
1717 Nicholas Rowe is appointed British Poet Laureate by George I
1732 Foundations laid for Bank of England
1774 English chemist Joseph Priestley discovers oxygen by isolating it in its gaseous state
1781 British army under general Cornwallis occupies Yorktown, Virginia
1798 Battle of the Nile: British Royal Navy under Admiral Horatio Nelson attacks and decimates the French fleet at Aboukir Bay off the Nile Delta, Egypt
1834 Slavery Abolition Act 1833 comes into effect, abolishes slavery throughout the British Empire
1836 As part of their homeward journey on the HMS Beagle, Charles Darwin returns to Bahia in Brazil
1838 Apprenticeship system abolished in most of the British Empire. Former slaves no longer indentured to former owners.
1840 Labourer slaves in most of the British Empire are emancipated
1883 A papyrus offered to British Museum for £10,000 (forgery)
1883 Inland postal service begins in Great Britain
1886 Great Britain annexes Kermadec-Island near New Zealand
1890 Cecil Rhodes' colonists reach Lundi
1896 George Samuelson completes rowing Atlantic (NY to England)
1911 Transportation workers begin a major strike in England; part of a wave of industrial unrest
1914 British Grand Fleet reaches Scapa Flow
1918 British troops enter Vladivostok

Scotland

1965 Scottish Lotus driver Jim Clark wins the German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring to clinch his second F1 World Drivers Championship

Deaths in History

1402 Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, son of Edward III of England, dies at 61
1708 Edward Tyson, British Physician and father of comparative anatomy (The Anatomy of a Pygmy, 1698), dies at 57
1714 Anne Stuart, Queen of England (1702-14), dies at about 49
1743 Richard Savage, English poet and playwright, dies at about 46
1796 Robert Pigot, British army officer (b. 1720)
1837 Walter Geikie, Scottish painter, dies at 41
1896 William Robert Grove, Welsh physicist and inventor of the first fuel cell, dies at 85
1920 Bal Gangadhar Tilak, early Indian nationalist leader, dies at 64
1926 Israel Zangwill, Jewish author (Children of The Ghetto) and Zionist leader, dies at 62
1990 Norbert Elias, German/English/Neth philosopher/sociologist, dies

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Re: On this day

Post by macliam » Sun Aug 01 2021 1:26pm

Richard Frost wrote:
Sun Aug 01 2021 10:55am
1st August 2021

LAMMAS/LUGHNASDH Wiccan LUGHNASADH Pagan
Lughnasadh, otherwise called Lammas, is the time of the corn harvest, when Pagans reap those things they have sown and when they celebrate the fruits of the mystery of Nature. At Lughnasadh, Pagans give thanks for the bounty of the Goddess as Queen of the Land.
As my old English teacher would have written "whence?" All the "pagan"/"wiccan" references are modernist tosh - and it had nothing to do with any "queen of the land".

Lughnasa is one of the four key dates of the Celtic calendar, the start of Autumn or the harvest season. It is the day dedicated to the old god Lugh and was a day of celebration. It was co-opted by the Christian church and named "Loaf-Mass", which mutated to Lammas.
Thanked by: Richard Frost, Kelantan
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Mon Aug 02 2021 10:41am

Mon Aug 2nd, 2021

August, 2021

Anti-Frizz Month
Happiness Happens Month
Water Quality Month


Ice Cream Sandwich Day
If you have never had an ice cream sandwich before, you are seriously missing out! This is one of the most delicious ice cream treats. It is simple to make & is extremely tasty. An ice cream sandwich is simply a frozen dessert that has two cookies, wafers, or biscuits, with ice cream in the middle. It combines two amazing things; ice creams and biscuits. What more could you really want? It is not hard to see why this dessert is so popular, and so it is only right that we have a day to celebrate this amazing treat, isn’t it?
You may be wondering where this amazing idea came from and how many people enjoy it! There are lots of great facts regarding ice cream sandwiches, so you can spend your day digging a little bit deeper into this popular treat and when it all started out. We know that there were ice cream sandwiches available for sale by street vendors in New York from the late 1800s, and so it is definitely a treat that has been enjoyed for quite some time now!

Colouring Book Day
The first colouring book was established in the late 1800’s by the McLoughlin Brothers when they first released ‘The Little Folks Painting Book’. From that point forward they continued to produce books of this sort right up until the 1920’s, when they joined forced with the Milton Bradley Company. Colouring Book Day encourages the recognition of this long history of colouring books and the joy they can bring to children and adults alike. That’s right, adults can colour too! There are highly detailed books specifically designed to be used by adults. No, these books aren’t pornographic in nature (well, not all of them), but they are definitely intricate and beautiful, and that’s before you start applying colour to the page. Colouring books have been used for everything from educational purposes (colouring books are in every school), to aiding in therapy and health. There are even special colouring books intended to help a child understand what is going to happen to them during surgery, a little understanding can assuage a large amount of fear.

A selection of Birthdays

1754 Pierre Charles L'Enfant, French-born American architect who laid out Washington, D.C., born in Paris, France (d. 1825)
1820 John Tyndall, Irish physicist who demonstrated why the sky is blue and proved that the Earth's atmosphere has a greenhouse effect, born in Leighlinbridge, County Carlow (d. 1893)
1834 Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi, French sculptor (designed the Statue of Liberty), born in Colmar, France (d. 1904)
1858 William Watson, British poet (Prince's Quest, Father of Forest), born in Burley-in-Wharfedale, Yorkshire (d. 1935)
1867 Ernest Dowson, British poet (Decorations in Verse and Prose), born in Lee, London (d.1900)
1881 Ethel M. Dell, English author (Storm Drift), born in London (d. 1939)
1882 George Sargent, English golfer (US Open 1909), born in Dorking, Surrey (d. 1962)
1891 Arthur Bliss, English composer (Olympians), born in London (d.1975)
1899 Charles Bennett, English screenwriter, born in Shoreham-by-Sea, Sussex (d. 1995)
1899 George Malcolm Thomson, British journalist, born in Leith (d. 1996)
1906 Albert Goodwin, English historian, born in Sheffield (d. 1995)
1910 Lawrence Josset, British engraver, born in Cambridgeshire (d. 1995)
1910 Roger MacDougall, Scottish playwright and screenwriter (The Man in the White Suit), born in Glasgow (d. 1993)
1921 Alan Whicker, Journalist & TV broadcaster (Whicker's World), born Cairo, Egypt (d. 2013)
1922 Lord Murray of Epping Forest [Lionel], British labour politician and union leader (General Secretary TUC), born in Hadley, Telford (d. 1984)
1924 James Baldwin, American novelist (Go Tell it on Mountain, Another Country) and playwright (The Amen Corner), born in Harlem, New York (d. 1987)
1927 Peter Swinnereton-Dyer, English mathematician, born in Ponteland, Northumberland (d. 2018)
1928 Hugh Francis Lamprey, British ecologist (d. 1996)
1928 Malcolm Hilton, English cricket slow left-arm (4 Tests), born in Chadderton, Lancashire (d. 1990)
1929 John Gale, British theatrical producer (Chichester Festival), born in Chigwell, Essex, England
1929 Lord David Waddington, British politician (Home Secretary 1989-90), born in Burnley (d. 2017)
1932 Peter O'Toole, Irish actor (Lord Jim, Beckett, Lawrence of Arabia), born in Leeds (d. 2013)
1936 Anthony Payne, British composer (Phoenix Mass; Visions and Journeys), critic, and musicologist, born in London (d. 2021)
1937 Jim McLean, Scottish soccer forward (Hamilton Academical, Clyde, Dundee) and manager (Dundee United 1971-93), born in Larkhall (d. 2020)
1943 Rose Tremain, British novelist and playwright (Restoration), born in London
1944 Jim Capaldi, English singer and songwriter (Traffic - "Something So Strong"; "The Low Spark of High Heeled Boys"), born in Evesham (d. 2005)
1948 Robert Holdstock, English sci-fi author (Ghost Dance, Labyrinth), born in Hythe, Kent (d. 2009)
1948 Andy Fairweather Low, British guitarist (Amen Corner), born in Ystrad Mynach, Wales
1949 Madeleine Smith, English actress (Vampire Lovers), born in Sussex
1950 Ted Turner, English rock guitarist and vocalist (Wishbone Ash), born in Birmingham
1954 Sammy McIlroy, Irish soccer star (Manchester United), born in Belfast
1961 Pete de Freitas, English rock drummer (Echo & the Bunnyman), born in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago (d. 1989)
1962 Lee Mavers, British singer and songwriter (The La's - "There She Goes"), born in Liverpool
1968 John Pinkerton, English computer scientist who designed the first business computer in England, the LEO computer, born in London (d. 1997)
1971 Michael Hughes, Irish footballer, born in Larne
1973 Brendan Dolan, Irish darts player (2011 - played perfect 9 dart game), born Enniskillen
1990 Alice Rose Connor, British actress, born in Buckinghamshire. She is best known for her roles in the television adaptation of Jacqueline Wilson's novel The Illustrated Mum, in the children's television series The New Worst Witch (a spin-off from The Worst Witch), and in the film The Thief Lord as Hornet. She first started acting as Alice in Fun Song Factory. She also had a small part in the 2001 movie A Knight's Tale. Alice Connor also starred in the programme My Spy Family as Elle Bannon, which was shown on Boomerang in the UK.
1992 Charli XCX [Charlotte Aitchison], English singer-songwriter (Charli), born in Cambridge
1994 Jacob Collier, English musician and producer (Djesse Vol. 1, 2, 3), born in London

On this day in British History

1100 King William II of England (William Rufus) is killed by an arrow shot by Sir Walter Tyrell while hunting in the New Forest
1610 English explorer Henry Hudson enters the bay later named after him, the Hudson Bay
1695 Daniel Quare receives a British patent for his portable barometer
1798 Battle of the Nile: Royal Navy under Admiral Horatio Nelson further decimates the French fleet
1858 Government of India transferred from East India Company to the British Crown
1865 Lewis Carroll publishes "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland"
1880 British Parliament officially adopts Greenwich Mean Time (GMT)
1894 Death duties 1st introduced in Britain
1914 Great Britain mobilizes
1945 Potsdam Conference between Joseph Stalin, Harry Truman and Winston Churchill (replaced by Clement Attlee after losing the 1945 general election) ends
2017 Great Britain's Prince Philip aged 96 makes his final solo public appearance before retiring from public engagements

Northern Ireland

1970 Rubber bullets used for the first time in Northern Ireland during 'The Troubles'

Deaths in History

1100 William II [Rufus], king of England, shot in New Forest at 44
1511 Andrew Barton, Scottish sailor and privateer, killed in a battle at sea
1696 Robert Campbell of Glenlyon, Scottish military commander (b. 1630)
1769 Daniel Finch, 8th Earl of Winchilsea, English politician, dies at 80
1788 Thomas Gainsborough, English painter (Blue Boy), dies at 61
1895 Joseph Thomson, Scottish geologist and early African explorer (Thomson's Gazelle), dies of pneumonia at 37
1916 Hamish MacCunn, Scottish composer (The Land of the Mountain and the Flood), and teacher, dies at 48
1922 Alexander Graham Bell, Scottish-born British American inventor (telephone), dies of diabetes complications at 75
1936 Louis Blériot, French aviator who made the first flight across the English Channel in a heavier than air aircraft, dies of a heart attack at 64
2003 Charles Kerruish, Manx politician and President of Tyndwald Isle of Man, dies at 86

Richard Frost
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Tue Aug 03 2021 11:19am

3rd August 2021

Watermelon Day
With a name like watermelon, one would expect it to be juicy, scrumptious and amazing. The watermelon meets, and in every case, exceeds that very exclamation. The presence of so much water makes this melon an impressive addition to the fruit family. Here it comes, the carefully procured but wonderfully amazing, Watermelon Day!

White Wine Day
There is a positive rainbow of wines in the world, but none so sweet and fair as those that are deemed white. Make no mistake, white wines are rarely if ever truly white in colour, but instead are beautiful varieties of straw-yellow, gold, or yellow-green. White Wine Day was created to help celebrate this wine that stands out from all others.

Clean Your Floors Day
Well hopefully it hasn’t quite gotten that bad around your house yet, but if you’re anything like us, mopping and sweeping are things you put off even when all the other cleaning is done. For that matter, we’re not terribly good at vacuuming either. That’s why Clean Your Floors Day exists, to remind us that getting down and scrubbing that floor clean is just as important a part of your household cleaning ritual as the counters and dishes.

Night Out
Night Out falls on the first Tuesday in August every year and serves to raise awareness as a community-based day. Creating a better community is important to everyone, and this event serves as a way for people to come together to help make this possible in whatever way they can. There is no one set way of taking part in observing this day, just do what you can to make the place you live in feel as safe as possible every day! While you may think that Night Out is all about putting your glad rags on and partying with friends, it is actually about paying tribute to those who protect us when we are on those nights out! The date is about promoting police-community partnerships in neighbourhoods all over the world. The day uses camaraderie to raise awareness and focus on community spirit. After all, we can make our neighbourhoods safer by having better relationships. No matter where in the world you are based, this is an important day to get involved in. A large part of Night Out involves shining the spotlight on community police programs. It is about forging stronger connections between people living in a neighbourhood and those who serve it. Depending on where you are based, there are a number of different programs that may be running to improve relationships and educate people. This includes the likes of neighbourhood watch, town watch, and drug prevention programs. If you do a little search online, you should be able to easily find information on any of the events that are going on in your area
It is important not to lose sight of the fact that the purpose of Night Out is to promote the partnership between the police and the community that they serve in order to make the neighbourhoods safer. Building strong connections, and strengthening those existing ones between the people who serve the neighbourhood and the people that live there is important, and this special day is one of the occasions where this is possible. Take a deeper look into the programs that are provided by those who serve and see what is actually being done to protect the neighbourhood. For example, there are a number of people who serve the community and make it a safe place to live, such as the Town or Neighbourhood Watch.

Cloves Syndrome Awareness Day
On Cloves Syndrome Awareness Day, everyone comes together to share knowledge about this rare and complex issue that causes overgrowth and can often lead to vascular problems. There are various symptoms of Cloves, a few of which are malformations that can press on the organs or spinal cord or soft tissue tumours. This event is held in August every year and is observed around the world to help more people understand what Cloves is and how it can impact people. Spreading awareness about rare diseases is important, and that is what this day is all about. Once you raise awareness, you see an increase in interest, compassion, and care towards those who suffer from issues like Cloves. Learning about all the differences throughout the world in humans can make a community stronger and more engaged. Events like this one lead to more chances for research, treatments, and provide improved outcomes for those who have this syndrome by creating a more active patient population. You can participate in this event no matter where you are in the world, so you don’t have to be in a specific place at a specific time to take part!

A Selection of Birthdays

1753 Charles Stanhope, 3rd earl Stanhope, REadical politician & scientist, born London (d. 1816)
1803 Joseph Paxton, Landscape architect (Crystal Palace), born in Milton Bryan, Bedfordshire (d.1865)
1811 Elisha Otis, American founder of the Otis Elevator Company and inventor of a safety device that prevents elevators from falling if the hoisting cable fails, born in Halifax, Vermont (d. 1861)
1823 Thomas Francis Meagher, Irish nationalist and Brigadier General (Union Army), born in Waterford, Ireland (d. 1867)
1851 Isabella Caroline Somerset, British philanthropist, temperance leader and campaigner for women's rights, born in London (d. 1921)
1855 Joe Hunter, English cricket wicket-keeper (5 Tests, 11 dismissals; Yorkshire CCC), born in Scarborough (d. 1891)
1860 William Kennedy Dickson, Scottish inventor (devised an early motion picture camera), born in Le Minihic-sur-Rance, Brittany, France (d. 1935)
1867 Stanley Baldwin, British Prime Minister (Conservative: 1923-24, 1924-29, 1935-37), born in Bewdley, Worcestershire (d. 1947)
1887 Rupert Brooke, British WW I poet (Lithuania, The Soldier), born in Rugby (d. 1915)
1891 Leslie Henson, Comedian/actor (Lady Luck, Funny Face, Harvey), born in Notting Hill (d. 1957)
1911 Alex McCrindle, Scottish actor (Star Wars, Eye of the Needle), born in Glasgow (d. 1990)
1920 P. D. James [Phyllis Dorothy], Baroness James of Holland Park, English crime writer (Cover Her Face), born in Oxford, (d. 2014)
1921 Alec Wyton, English-born American composer, born in London (d. 2007)
1926 Tony Bennett [Benedetto], American singer (I Left My Heart in San Francisco), born in Far Rockaway, Queens, New York
1936 Edward Petherbridge, English actor (The Guardians), born in West Bowling, Bradford
1937 Steven Berkoff, English actor (Rambo: First Blood Part II), born in Stepney, London
1938 Terry Wogan, British broadcaster (Eurovision Song Contest, Blankety Blank), born in Limerick, Ireland (d. 2016)
1945 Eamon Dunphy, Irish footballer, born in Dublin, Ireland
1946 Jack Straw, British politician (Member of Parliament for Blackburn), born in Buckhurst Hill, Essex
1953 Ian Bairnson, Scottish musician (Alan Parsons Project; Kate Bush), born in Lerwick, Shetland Isles
1954 Gary Peters, English footballer, born in Carshalton, London
1956 Kirk Brandon, Rocker (Theatre of Hate, Spear of Destiny-Outland), born in Westminster,
1959 Martin Atkins, English drummer (Nine Inch Nails), born in Coventry
1967 Skin [Deborah Dyer] Jamaican-British singer (Skunk Anansie), born in Brixton, London
1990 Jourdan Dunn, British model, born in London

On this day in British History

1692 Battle at Steenkerke: French beat English/Dutch army
1704 English/Dutch fleet under Rooke/Callenburgh occupy Gibraltar
1798 Battle of the Nile: British Admiral Horatio Nelson forces the remnants of the French fleet to surrender, concluding a decisive victory for the British who capture or destroy 11 French ships of the line and 2 frigates
1904 British journalist Francis Younghusband visits forbidden city Lhasa
1907 Emperor Wilhelm (Germany) meets with Tsar Nicholas (Russia) to discuss Germany's plan to build a railroad to Baghdad; the discussion helps move Russia towards Britain and eventually the Triple Alliance
1940 Italian troops invade British Somalia
1940 Seaplane Clare makes 1st British passenger flight to the US
1957 British offensive against imam Galeb Ben Ali of Oman
1972 British premier Edward Heath proclaims emergency crisis due to dock strike
1973 Flash fire kills 51 at amusement park (Isle of Man, UK)

Scotland

1860 William Kennedy Dickson, Scottish inventor (devised an early motion picture camera), born in Le Minihic-sur-Rance, Brittany, France (d. 1935)

Weddings in History

2000 British PM Gordon Brown (49) weds Sarah Jane Macaulay (36) in North Queensferry, Fife

Deaths in History

1460 King James II of Scotland (b. 1430)
1712 Joshua Barnes, English scholar (b. 1654)
1792 Richard Arkwright, English industrialist and inventor (created the spinning frame), dies at 59
1797 Jeffrey Amherst, English gov-gen of America, dies at 80
1805 Christopher Anstey, English poet (The New Bath Guide), dies at 80
1879 Joseph Severn, English painter (b. 1793)
1916 Sir Roger Casement, an Ulster Protestant and ardent Irish nationalist, executed by the British at 51
1924 Joseph Conrad, Polish/British writer (Heart of Darkness), dies at 66
1993 James Donald, Scottish actor (Bridge on River Kwai, Vikings, In Which We Serve, Way Ahead), dies of stomach cancer at 76
2007 John Gardner, British author (b. 1926)
2015 Robert Conquest, English historian and poet (The Great Terror), dies at 98

macliam
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Re: On this day

Post by macliam » Tue Aug 03 2021 1:42pm

Richard Frost wrote:
Tue Aug 03 2021 11:19am
3rd August 2021
.
.
Deaths in History

1916 Sir Roger Casement, an Ulster Protestant and ardent Irish nationalist, executed by the British at 51
1924 Joseph Conrad, Polish/British writer (Heart of Darkness), dies at 66
There's an odd (and unfortunate) linkage between these two.

Roger Casement was NOT an Ulster Protestant, although his father was. He was born in Dublin - and his mother, although Anglican, supposedly had him baptised a Catholic at the age of three when the family moved to Wales and he died a Catholic. Conrad became a British diplomat, critical of the treatment of the Boers and other imperial oppression. After leaving the diplomatic service in 1913 he was instrumental in the creation of the Irish Volunteers and went to Germany to gain support for the coming rebellion. Captured when landing from a German U-Boat, he was dubiously found guilty of high treason and sentenced to hang. However, due to his standing as a champion of the oppressed, the government was so concerned at calls for leniency, it published the "Black Diaries", purportedly outing him as a homosexual and "sexual deviant" to reduce any challenge to the verdict - though the veracity of these documents is much disputed. He was hanged and buried in quicklime.

Casement had met Conrad in the Congo and said of him that he "thinks, speaks, well, most intelligent and very sympathetic". But later, after Casement's arrest and trial, Conrad claimed "I judged he was a man, properly speaking, of no mind at all. I don't mean stupid. I mean that he was all emotion." Quite the volte face for a man supposedly critical of imperialism......
Thanked by: Richard Frost, Kelantan
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