On this day

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Richard Frost
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Wed Aug 04 2021 10:55am

4th August 2021

Coast Guard Day
Coast Guard Day celebrates the courageous work of coast guards. When Hurricane Katrina struck the Atlantic coast of America, the US Coast Guardsmen saved over 33,500 lives, an estimated 24,000 of these were rescued from peril in severely dangerous conditions. In the UK, although not directly associated with HM Coast Guard, the RNLI (Royal National Lifeboat Institution) are a charitable organisation with the sole aim of rescuing those in distress at sea. They launch over 6500 times a year, and have saved over 134,000 lives since their founding.

Pakistan Coast Guard Day is celebrated on September 8.

International Clouded Leopard Day
International Clouded Leopard Day (ICLD) is a day of international awareness and an attempt to increase the profile of Clouded leopards both in captivity and in the wild. Organizers of ICLD are Lauren Amos and Dan Kemp, two carnivore keepers from Howletts Wild Animal Park in Kent, who work with this shy and elusive species on a daily basis. ICLD at the park included talks, tours, and activities for all ages but the day didn’t just exist in Kent, this day of celebration reached zoos in the USA and Asia. The objective is to raise awareness and unite conservation thinking amongst zoological collections, charities, NGO’s, businesses and all those with an interest in one of the world`s most beautiful and iconic cats, the Clouded leopard. Every species on earth has its own unique role to play in maintaining an over-arching ecological balance both in life and in nature.

Single Working Women’s Day
The importance of single women to our economic and social growth cannot be understated. Every year millions of single women work in industries all over the world, doing the work for themselves and living for themselves. Single Working Women’s Day reminds us how important each and every one of them is, and that it’s not just men that make the world go round.

Assistance Dog Day
Assistance dogs improve the quality of life for countless people who live with disability or illness, and a special day celebrates these four-legged friends every year. Assistance Dog Day recognises and celebrates assistance dogs and their trainers. It aims to raise funds and increase awareness of the work they do. It is part of International Assistance Dog Week, a yearly event started by long-time paraplegic, Marcie Davis. There are many different kinds of assistance dogs, from the well-known guide dogs and hearing alert dogs that help people with vision and hearing loss, to lesser-known helpers like seizure alert and medical alert dogs that can recognise the signs of heart attacks, strokes and epilepsy.
A range of events are held to celebrate Assistance Dog Day, including dog shows, sponsored dog walks, talks and dog graduation ceremonies. Many assistance dog training facilities hold open days and tours on this day to show the work that they do.

A Selection of Birthdays

1701 Thomas Blackwell, Scottish classical scholar, born in Aberdeen (d. 1757)
1792 Percy Bysshe Shelley, English romantic poet (Adonais; Prometheus Unbound), born in Horsham, Sussex (d. 1822)
1805 William Rowan Hamilton, Irish astronomer and mathematician, born in Dublin (d. 1865)
1821 Louis Vuitton, French founder of the Louis Vuitton brand of leather goods now owned by LVMH, born in Anchay, France (d. 1892)
1825 Arthur Haygarth, Cricket batsman (Middlesex & Surrey, cricket historian), born Hastings (d.1903)
1834 John Venn, English mathematician (Venn Diagram), born in Kingston upon Hull (d. 1923)
1839 Walter Pater, writer (Plato & Platoism), born in London was an English essayist, literary/art critic & fiction writer, regarded as one of the great stylists. His works on Renaissance subjects were popular but controversial in his time (d. 1894)
1870 Harry Lauder, Comedian & singer (Roamin' in the Gloamin), born Portobello, Edinburgh (d. 1950)
1877 Dame Laura Knight, English impressionist artist, born in Long Eaton, Derbyshire (d. 1970)
1900 Douglas L Mays, cartoonist (Punch) (d.1991)
1900 Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, British consort of King George VI and Queen Mother after his death, born in Hitchin, Hertfordshire, (d. 2002)
1901 Louis Armstrong, American jazz trumpeter and singer ("Hello, Dolly!"; "What A Wonderful World"), born in New Orleans, Louisiana (d. 1971)
1904 Joe Tate, English footballer, born in Old Hill, Cradley Heath, England (d. 1973)
1905 Michael Scott Montague Fordham, English child psychiatrist and Jungian analyst, born in Kensington, London (d. 1995)
1908 Osbert Lancaster, English cartoonist and author (Daily Express), born in London (d. 1986)
1923 Arthur Butterworth, Classical trumpet player & composer, b. New Moston, Manchester (d. 2014)
1930 John Gorman, printer and socialist historian, born in Stratford, East London (d. 1996)
1937 David Vickerman Bedford, Composer & educator, born Hendon, Middlesex (d. 2011)
1941 Martin Jarvis OBE Actor, b. Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. Also producer of radio drama. Described by the BBC as "one of Britain's most distinguished & versatile actors", has had a varied career in theatre, film & television, He has become particularly noted for radio acting & voicing audiobooks.
1943 David Carr, British rock keyboardist (The Fortunes), born in Leyton, London (d. 2011)
1943 Rodney Stuart Pattison, British yachtsman, double Olympic gold medalist in sailing won at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics and 1972 Munich Olympics both in the Flying Dutchman class. He also won a silver medal at the 1976 Montreal Olympics in the same class to become Great Britain’s most successful Olympic yachtsman until Ben Ainslie overtook him with 3 gold medals and a silver medal at four different Olympic Games at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Pattisson was a member of Itchenor Sailing Club.
1945 John Qace Hardbattle, political activist, served in the British army, studied at Oxford University, and farmed cattle in Ghanzi before taking up the cause of Bushman rights. "Son of a half-Bushman mother, Khwa, and an English father, ", His father a retired policeman who travelled to South Africa and then Botswana. There he married "Kawi", John's mother. John Hardbattle co-founded (with Roy Sesana) and became leader of the First People of Kalahari (FPK).
1946 Maureen Starkey [Mary Cox], British ex-wife of Beatle Ringo Starr, born in Liverpool (d. 1994)
1946 Max Middleton, Rock keyboard player (Jeff Beck Group), born in Amersham, Buckinghamshire
1947 Paul Layton, Musician and rocker (The New Seekers - "I'd Like to Teach the World to Sing"), born Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire
1952 Moya Brennan [Máire Ní Bhraonáin], Irish folksinger and harpist (Clannad; Máire), born in Dublin,
1957 John Wark, Scottish former footballer who spent most of his playing time with Ipswich Town. He won a record four Player of the Year awards before becoming one of the four inaugural members of the club's Hall of Fame. Wark had long spells at the club, which bookended his career, and a third, brief interlude dividing his briefer periods at Liverpool and Middlesbrough. A versatile player, Wark played most of his professional games as a midfielder, although he sometimes played as a central defender and on occasion as a striker. Born in Glasgow, Wark represented Scotland in international football, winning 29 caps and scoring seven goals. This included selection for Scotland in the 1982 FIFA World Cup in which he made three appearances and scored twice. During his playing career, Wark appeared in the film Escape to Victory. Since retiring as a professional player in 1996, he has continued to work for Ipswich Town—since September 2008 in the corporate hospitality department. His autobiography, Wark On, was published in 2009.
1959 John Gormley, Irish politician, Leader of the Green Party, Mayor of Dublin (1994-95), born Dublin
1959 Laurence Anholt, British children's author, born in London

1960 Bernard Rose, English filmmaker and screenwriter, considered a pioneer of digital filmmaking, began his career by making Super 8 films at the age of 9. The BBC held an amateur movie competition which he won in 1975, causing his 3-minute film to air on the BBC. He later worked for Jim Henson on the last season of The Muppet Show, as a gofer, in the puppet workshop. He is best known for directing the horror films Paperhouse (1988) and Candyman (1992), the historical romances Immortal Beloved (1994) and Anna Karenina (1997), and the independent drama Ivans xtc (2000), for which he was nominated for the Independent Spirit Award for Best Director and the John Cassavetes Award. He has also been nominated for the Grand Prix des Amériques and the Venice Horizons Prize.
1961 Barack Obama, 44th United States President (Democrat: 2009-17) and first African-American president, born in Honolulu, Hawaii
1962 Paul Reynolds, British rock guitarist (A Flock of Seagulls - "I Ran (So Far Away)"), born Liverpool,
Person of interest
1964 Gary King, British radio presenter for Smooth Radio
1981 Ben Scott, English cricketer began playing his cricket at Wycombe House Cricket Club. Scott began to work on his batting and progressed through the Middlesex Colts Age groups before signing for the Middlesex. A lack of opportunities meant that he crossed the Thames and moved to Middlesex's local rivals Surrey for one season, where he was behind Jonathan Batty as first choice wicket-keeper. Now works as a personal trainer.
1981 [Rachel] Meghan Markle, American former actress, Duchess of Sussex and wife of Prince Harry, born in Los Angeles, California

On this day in British History

1265 Battle of Evesham: English prince Edward beats Simon de Montfort the younger
1347 English troops conquer Fort Calais
1351 Sea battle at Zwartewaal: Willem V beats Hoeksen and English
1666 Sea battle between Netherlands and England
1704 War of Spanish Succession, English and Dutch troops occupy Gibraltar
1730 Crown prince Frederick of Prussia escapes to England
1772 Poet and artist William Blake aged 14 is first apprenticed to engraver James Basire in London
1870 British Red Cross Society forms
1900 An allied expeditionary force, made up of Japanese, Russian, British, French and American troops, sets off from Tientsin for Peking, China, to put down Boxer rebellion
1914 WWI: Germany declares war on Belgium; Britain declares war on Germany
1914 WWI: Field Marshal Lord Kitchener becomes British Minister of War after British declaration of war on Germany
1916 The Turks attack the British line at Romani in the northern Sinai (WWI)
1934 II British Empire Games open at London's White City Stadium
1941 Winston Churchill departs on Prince of Wales to US
1942 British premier Winston Churchill arrives in Cairo
1943 British premier Winston Churchill travels on the Queen Mary to Canada
1944 British 8th Army reaches suburbs of Florence, Italy
1967 British pirate radio station Radio 355 goes off air.

Deaths in History

1265 Simon de Montfort the younger, English Earl of Leicester, dies in battle
1338 Thomas of Brotherton, 1st Earl of Norfolk, son of Edward I of England (b. 1300)
1578 Thomas Stucley, English adventurer
1598 William Cecil, 1st baron Burghley, English statesman, dies at 77
1612 Hugh Broughton, English scholar (b. 1549)
1633 George Abbott, English theologist and the Archbishop of Canterbury (1611-1633), dies at 60
1927 John Dillon, Irish nationalist and British Lower house leader, dies at 75
2004 Sir Kenneth Couzens, British Deputy Chairman of British Coal Board and significant figure during Miners Strike, dies at 79

Richard Frost
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Thu Aug 05 2021 10:26am

5th August 2020

Work Like a Dog Day
As dogs seem to spend most of their life dozing, it can be difficult to see how activity on Work Like A Dog Day could be anything other than leisurely. In reality, Work Like A Dog Day is a chance to display the inner grit and determination normally demonstrated by canines when seeking sustenance as you go about your daily workplace chores. When was the last time you were really productive? Give colleagues and the boss an occasion to remember when you turn up early and dig in to that work pile with enthusiasm and drive.
If that all sounds like too much hard graft, Work Like A Dog Day is also an opportunity to reward those in your life who really do Work Like A Dog. Why not give the breadwinner a treat? Or take some of the load off their shoulders so they can enjoy some well-earned rest?

Blogger Day
If you have ever created a blog before, the chances are you have probably used Blogger, especially for your first ever blog! A lot of students will be nodding their heads while reading this. Brings back good memories. Of course, there is a huge blogging community today. Some people blog to get their opinions heard others blog to make money. A lot of these people rely on Blogger to do so! Blogger Day celebrates everything that this platform is about! Blogger is a blog-publishing service. It was originally developed by Pyra Labs, yet it was then purchased by Google in 2003. You have probably seen plenty of Blogger sites, as the subdomain tends to be blogspot.com. However, a lot of people also use their own custom domains that they have purchased, so not all Blogger sites will end with that subdomain. Users of the platform are allowed to have as many as 100 blogs per account, and so you’re never going to run out of blogs to create.

India Pale Ale Day

India Pale Ale Day has been created to celebrate the drink that is India Pale Ale! If you have never tried India Pale Ale before, now is the perfect excuse for you to do so. India Pale Ale has high levels of alcohol. It is a hobby style of beer, with hops referring to the flowers of the hop flowers, which are used for flavouring and bettering beer. They also act as a stability agent. Aside from the bitterness, they impart citrus, fruit, or floral aromas and flavours. This type of beer has undergone a bit of a renaissance in recent times. It was developed in 1840 in England. However, this style of beer had mainly died out. That was until the renaissance of American craft beer occurred in the late 20th century. Today, India Pale Ales are flagship beers for craft brewers all around the world, making them exceptionally popular. Because of this, it is only right that we have India Pale Ale Day to celebrate this type of beer! There are a number of different types of India Pale Ales that are produced today. This includes a lot of different sub-styles. For example, you have the Double India Pale Ales, which are also called Imperial India Pale Ales. These represent a very hoppy and strong type of India Pale Ale, which usually have an alcohol content that is more than 7.5 percent by volume. The style is believed to have originated with Vinnie Cilurzo, who is the owner of California’s Russian River Brewing Company. It is believed that he created this style at the Blind Pig Brewery in California in 1994. This brewery is now defunct. Another type of India Pale Ale that is popular today is the New England India Pale Ale. This is also sometimes called Juicy India Pale Ale or Hazy India Pale Ale. This is a style of beer that was invented when the Heady Topper was created by John Kimmich, of The Alchemist. These India Pale Ales have an emphasis on hop aroma, with low bitterness. They are characterized by floral, citrus, and juicy flavors. They also have a hazy appearance, hence why they are often called Hazy India Pale Ale, and they have a smooth mouthfeel or consistency. These characteristics are reached through a use of a number of different brewing techniques. This includes adjusting the chemistry of the water, the timing of adding the hops, and the use of a certain strain of yeast. This merely scratches the surface when it comes to the different types of India Pale Ales that you can find on the market today. You can also get Brut India Pale Ale, which is a dry and crisp version of the drink. The enzyme amyloglucosidase is added to the drink in order to get rid of the sugars to create this drink. There is then Cascadian Dark Ale, which is also known as Black India Pale Ale, which is not pale in colour, as the name suggests. It has a much darker malty flavour because of the use of roasted malts, yet it shares the same bitter hoppy flavours. You also have West Coast India Pale Ale, which is known for being dry, very clear, and having a low content of malt. Or, what about Triple India Pale Ale? This type of ale is characterized by higher alcohol content and higher hop flavours. The alcohol content for this type of India Pale Ale tends to be over 10 percent ABV.

Oyster Day
Oyster Day is a celebration of this most versatile mollusc. Oyster is the common name for a number of different groups of bivalve molluscs. Some species of oysters are commonly eaten, either cooked or raw, as a delicacy. While other types of oyster, such as pearl oysters, are not normally consumed by humans, they are harvested for their pearls.

Underwear Day
When it comes to understanding Underwear Day, it is not all about lace and leather. Cotton, Spandex, neoprene, polyester, velvet and so many more materials are used in many different types and styles of undergarments. From Bras to panties, corsets to boxers, one can always find some sort of garment to go between their skin and the outer clothing layer. This day is about celebrating those articles of clothing, and the body image we all attempt to cultivate with them. Revel in your undergarments, show them off and smile, for you should be happy with who you are, and embrace that body image!

A Selection of Birthdays

1604 John Eliot, English Puritan missionary "Apostle to Indians," and Bible translator, baptized in Widford, Hertfordshire (d. 1690)
1624 William Tucker, 1st child of African descent to be born in English colony in America, born in Jamestown, Virginia
1662 James Anderson, Scottish historian, born in Edinburgh (d. 1728)
1815 Edward John Eyre, Explorer & Governor of Jamaica, b. Whipsnade, Bedfordshire (d. 1901)
1843 James Scott Skinner, Composer & dancing master, born in Arbeadie, Aberdeenshire (d. 1927)
1862 Joseph Merrick, "The Elephant Man", born in Leicester (d. 1890)
1874 Horace Rawlins, English golfer (US Open 1895), born in Shanklin, Isle of Wight (d. 1935)
1882 Joe English, Flemish Irish painter (designed WWI gravestones), born in Bruges, Belgium (d. 1918)
1887 Reginald Owen, British actor (Mary Poppins, Sherlock Holmes), born in Wheathampstead, Hertfordshire (d. 1972)
1890 Hans Gál, Austrian-British composer (Die heilige Ente (The Sacred Duck)), born in Brunn am Gebirge, Austria (d. 1987)
1904 Kenneth Thimann, English American botanist (Balzan Prize), born in Ashford, Kent (d. 1997)
1910 Jacquetta Hawkes, English archaeologist/author (A Country), (d. 1996)
1918 Betty Oliphant, British-Canadian ballerina, co-founded of National Ballet School of Canada, born in London (d. 2004)
1930 Neil Armstrong, American X-15 pilot and astronaut - 1st man on the Moon (Gemini 8, Apollo 11), born in Wapakoneta Ohio, (d. 2012)
1935 John Saxon, American actor (Bees, Nightmare on Elm St, Electric Horseman), born in Brooklyn, New York (d. 2020)
1937 Alan Howard, Theatre & film actor (Royal Shakespeare Company), born London (d. 2015)
1942 Rick Huxley, English guitarist (Dave Clark 5 - "Glad All Over"), born in Dartford (d. 2013)
1947 Willie Weeks, American session and touring bass player (George Harrison; Vince Gill; Wynonna Judd; David Bowie; Eric Clapton), born in Salemburg, North Carolina
1948 Ray Clemence MBE, English soccer goalkeeper (England 61 caps, Liverpool, Tottenham), born in Skegness, Lincolnshire (d. 2020)
1959 Pete Burns, English singer (Dead or Alive - "Spin Me Round"), born in Bebington (d. 2016)
1968 Marine Le Pen, French politician (President of the National Front Party), born in Neuilly-sur-Seine
1968 Colin Steele McRae, British rally driver, born in Lanark (d. 2007)
1975 Antony Cotton, English actor (Coronation Street), born in Bury
1979 David Healy, Northern Irish footballer and manager (Linfield), born in Killyleagh, County Down
1980 Wayne Bridge, English premier league footballer, born in Southampton
1980 Sophie Winkleman, English actress, born in London
2184 Christine Lauren Chapel, (Star Trek), born in Davenport Heights, Vermont
2186 Kevin Thomas Riley, Tasvennir, Tarsus IV (Star Trek)

On This Day in British History

910 The last major Viking army to raid England is defeated at the Battle of Tettenhall by the allied forces of Mercia and Wessex, led by King Edward and Earl Aethelred
1100 Henry I is crowned King of England in Westminster Abbey
1583 Humphrey Gilbert claims Newfoundland for the British crown - first English colony in North America and the beginning of the British Empire
1666 English fleet beats Dutch under Michiel de Ruyter
1745 Jacobite Rising 1745: Jacobite forces capture British company of troops under Captain Scott
1763 Pontiac's War: Battle of Bushy Run - British forces led by Henry Bouquet defeat Chief Pontiac's Indians at Bushy Run
1846 Oregon territory divided between US & Britain at 49th parallel
1858 First transatlantic telegraph cable lands at Trinity Bay, Newfoundland spearheaded by Cyrus West Field (will fail after 3 weeks)
1874 Japan launches its postal savings system, modeled after a similar system in England
1890 British and French accord to divide African colonization
1917 British troops attack canal of Ypres in Boesinghe, Belgium
1942 British government cancels agreement of Munich
1943 Sicily: 3 US A-36's bomb British headquarters
1963 Britain, USA and USSR sign nuclear test ban treaty
1967 Pirate Radio Station 333 (Radio Britain) & Radio London close down
2011 Svalbard Polar Bear Attack - a rogue Polar Bear attacks and kills a British schoolboy

Northern Ireland

1971 The British Parliament debate the security situation in Northern Ireland

Scotland

1305 William Wallace, who led Scottish resistance to England, is captured by the English near Glasgow and transported to London for trial and execution.
1388 Battle of Otterburn, a border skirmish between the Scottish and the English in Northern England
1978 The first all-seater stadium is opened in Aberdeen, Scotland; Aberdeen & London club Tottenham Hotspurs play a friendly to inaugurate the Pittodrie Stadium
2018 English swimmer Adam Peaty breaks his own world record in 57.00 as he wins his 9th European 100m breaststroke title in Glasgow

Wales

1925 Plaid Cymru is formed with the aim of disseminating knowledge of the Welsh language, which is in danger of dying out

Weddings in History

1885 Author Arthur Conan Doyle (26) weds Louisa Hawkins

Deaths in History

1743 John Hervey, 2nd Baron Hervey, English statesman and writer (b. 1696)
1792 Frederick North, Lord North, Prime Minister of Great Britain (Tory: 1770-82), "who lost America", dies at 60
1799 Richard Howe, British admiral, dies at 73
1895 Friedrich English, German textile manufacturer/marxist, dies
1929 Millicent Fawcett, English suffragist, dies at 82
1944 Maurice Turnbull, Welsh cricketer (England) rugby player (Wales), dies fighting in WWII at 38
1972 Harry Hylton-Foster, Speaker of the British House of Commons (b. 1905)
1984 Richard Burton, Welsh stage and screen actor (Cleopatra, The Robe), dies of cerebral hemorrhage at 58
1994 Clive Robertson Caldwell, British fighter pilot, dies at 84

Richard Frost
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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Fri Aug 06 2021 10:42am

6th August 2021

6 August (Friday) – 15 August (Sunday) FRAVARDIGAN/MUKTAD Zoroastrian (Shahenshahi-Parsi)
In the Fravardigan festival the immortal souls, together with their fravashis (the guardian spirits of departed ancestors, half man/half bird), come to reside in the place of worship. Many Zoroastrians take time off to pray, recite the five Gathas and cleanse their houses. Daily samples of sacred food are tasted by them during the daily ceremonies.

Fresh Breath Day
Most people aren’t aware of the fact that over 50% of the bacteria found in the human mouth contributes to bad breath. Brushing twice a day and using mouthwash is the obvious beginning of the way to fight this. But people with serious problems with halitosis (which is just a fancy medical term for bad breath) may struggle to get through the day without offending someone with their stinky mouth odours. Something many people don’t know is that mints and chewing gum that contain sugar can actually (in the long term) have the opposite effect than what people are hoping for. So if opting for mints or gum to help with the problem of bad breath, be sure to choose special products that are sugar free, making it more likely they won’t actually make the breath worse than it was before. Fresh Breath Day was created to educate and make people aware about these and other factors related to having Fresh Breath!

International Beer Day
For anyone who wants to take even a little glance around their city, one of the staples that can always be found is a good bar, a friendly pub or a busy night club. Whether a person is in rural Ireland, busy Hong Kong, the backwoods of Canada or even in the United Arab Emirates, there is always someplace to have a brewski. And this day is perfect for those that do enjoy those drinks, and to appreciate the people who make them – Beer Day!

Cycle to Work Day
Cycle to Work Day has been created in order to encourage people to do just that: cycle to work. It encourages people to give their bike a go and cycle to work, at least for one day of the year. There are so many different benefits that are associated with cycling to work. Not only is this good for your health but you are going to be doing your bit for the environment as well. There have even been government and state initiatives created around the world to encourage people to cycle to work more often. There are many different reasons why you should consider biking to work. Firstly, you may find that it is actually a lot of fun! Plus, biking to work is good for you! You are going to start the day off with some exercise, and there is no better way to start the day. This will make you feel good and happy for the rest of the day. After all, exercising releases those chemicals that make us feel happy. There are a number of other benefits to consider as well. For example, you are going to be able to save a considerable amount of money by cycling to work. It is worth totalling up how much you currently spend on your commute to work, whether you drive there or take the train. This money only adds up over time. When you cycle to work, the only expense you are going to have is your bike and a lock to secure it. If you calculate the difference over the course of a year, you are going to be able to save quite a lot of money! You will probably be surprised by just how much. So, you get fresh air, you can avoid traffic jams, you get some exercise added to your daily routine, and while you do this, you get to save a considerable amount of money in the process. Sounds good, right?

Farmworker Appreciation Day
Farmworker Appreciation Day was created to be a moment of action and appreciation for these workers and to raise awareness of the issues they face every year. Farmworkers help keep the world fed and work what is considered to be one of the most dangerous jobs in the first world, and yet the often not protected by the same laws that protect other workers. This is due in part to their seasonal status and their tendency to be immigrant workers who return to their home country after the harvest is complete.
Some of the hazards they face in their line of work include exposure to pesticides and fertilizers that can be toxic and cause rashes or worse to those exposed to them and the perils of working under the punishing summer sun for hours on end without shade. In the course of their jobs they apply pesticides, dig in fertilized soil, and harvest those same plants they previously doused with poison. In such perilous conditions, it’s not surprising that many die and fall sick each year from the hazards of their job.

International Sailor Moon Day
It all started with a small black cat with a lot to say, and a young girl named Usagi Tsukino who received a brooch that transforms her into the titular Sailor Moon. From that point forward a team of Sailor Guardians becomes assembled, and they’re out to save the world from all the enemies that come their way. International Sailor Moon Day celebrates this incredibly popular manga and the anime series that was birthed from it, so get out there and get your Guardian on!

A Selection of Birthdays

1504 Matthew "Nosey" Parker, Archbishop of Canterbury, born in Norwich, England (d. 1575)
1609 Richard Bennett, English Colonial Governor of Virginia, born in Wiveliscombe, Somerset (d. 1675)
1766 William Hyde Wollaston, English chemist and physicist (famous for discovering the chemical elements palladium and rhodium), born in East Dereham, Norfolk (d. 1828)
1775 Daniel O'Connell, Irish politician, born in Cahersiveen, County Kerry, Ireland (d. 1847)
1809 Alfred Tennyson, Poet Laureate (Charge of the Light Brigade), b. Somersby, Lincolnshire (d.1892)
1826 Thomas Alexander Browne, Australian writer (Robbery Under Arms), born in London (d. 1915)
1844 Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, born in Windsor Castle, Windsor (d. 1900)
1881 Alexander Fleming, Scottish bacteriologist (invented penicillin; Nobel Prize 1945), born in Lochfield, Renfrewshire (d. 1955)
1887 Dudley Benjafield, British racing driver, born in Edmonton, London (d. 1957)
1889 John Middleton Murry, Poet & literary critic (Between Two Worlds), b. London (d. 1957)
1891 William Slim, British general (d. 1970)
1896 Cyril Mockridge, British composer for film and television (Miracle On 34th Street; The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance), born in London (d. 1979)
1904 Ballard Berkeley [Blascheck], British actor (Fawlty Towers, East meets West, The BFG), born in Margate, Kent (d. 1988)
1908 James Lees-Milne, Writer & architectural historian, born Wickhamford, Worcestershire (d. 1997)
1910 Charles Ainslie Crichton, British director (Battle of Sexes) (d.1999)
1911 Lucille Ball, American comedienne & actress (I Love Lucy;Mame),b. Jamestown, New York(d.1989)
1914 Susan Cowdy, ornithologist (d.1996)
1914 Arthur Charles Dobson, British racing driver (d. 1980)
1919 Hugh Mendl, British record executive (Decca/Deram Records), born in London (d. 2008)
1926 Frank Finlay, British actor (Robbery, Lifeforce), born in Farnworth Lancashire (d. 2016)
1928 Andy Warhol, American pop artist and film producer (Frankenstein, Bad), born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (d. 1987)
1932 Howard Hodgkin, British abstract painter, born in London (d. 2017)
1933 Ron Wylie, Scottish soccer forward (Notts County, Aston Villa, Birmingham City) and manager (WBA), born in Glasgow (d. 2020)
1934 Billy Boston, Welsh rugby league footballer
1937 Dame Barbara Windsor, British actress (Carry On films, EastEnders). born in London (d. 2020)
1945 Ron Jones, British TV director (d. 1995)
1946 Allan Holdsworth, British guitarist, born in Bradford (d. 2017)
1955 Gordon J. Brand, English golfer (British Open 1986 runner-up), born in Cambridge (d. 2020)
1963 Charles Ingram, English former British Army major known for cheating on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire, born in Derbyshire
1963 Jamie Kensit, British pop singer (Eight Wonder - "I'm Not Scared"), born in Lambeth, London
1965 Mark Speight, British television presenter (d. 2008)
1971 Scott Christopher Minto, English footballer, Born. Bromborough)is an English former footballer who played as a left back in the Football League and the Premier League for Charlton Athletic, Chelsea, West Ham United and Rotherham United, and for Benfica in Portugal.
1972 Geri Horner [Halliwell], British pop singer "Ginger Spice" (Spice Girls), born in Watford
1980 Danny Collins, Welsh soccer defender (12 caps; Sunderland, Stoke City, Nottingham Forest), born in Chester
1982 Karl Davies, British actor, Born Manchester, He is an actor and producer, known for Chernobyl (2019), Happy Valley (2014) and Game of Thrones (2011)

On this day in British History

1699 HMS Roebuck, captained by William Dampier, lands at Shark Bay, Western Australia on the first British scientific expedition to Australia
1861 The British annex Lagos, Nigeria
1915 The British land more troops at Suvla Bay on the northern shore of Gallipoli in an effort to break the stalemate on the peninsula during WWI
1923 Henry Sullivan becomes 3rd person and first American to swim English Channel (27 hours 25 minutes Dover-Calais)
1926 American Gertrude Ederle (20) becomes 1st woman to swim English Channel in 14 hours, 39 minutes, a record for male or female
1962 Jamaica becomes independent after 300 years of British rule
1979 Marcus Hooper, 12, becomes then youngest person to swim English Channel
1991 Tim Berners-Lee releases files describing his idea for the World Wide Web. WWW debuts as a publicly available service on the Internet.

Deaths in History

1637 Ben Jonson, English playwright and poet, dies at 65
1645 Lionel Cranfield, 1st Earl of Middlesex, English merchant, dies at 70
1679 John Snell, British royalist, dies at 49 or 50
1759 Eugene Aram, English philologist (b. 1704)
1794 Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl Bathurst, British politician (b. 1714)
1866 John Mason Neale, English divine, scholar and hymnwriter (b. 1818)
1884 Robert Spear Hudson, English businessman, dies at 71
1937 Annie E F Horniman, Theatre owner (Abbey Theatre), dies at 76
1937 Ferdinand CS Schiller, British philosopher (Mind!), dies at 72
2005 Robin Cook, British politician (b. 1946)
2012 Sir Bernard Lovell, English radio astronomer, dies at 98

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On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Sat Aug 07 2021 10:38am

Sat August 7th, 2021

Particularly Preposterous Packaging Day
Have you ever battled vainly to open a tightly sealed bottle of tablets – only to end up with a sprained wrist and an even worse headache? Particularly Preposterous Packaging Day aims to lift the lid on this kind of problem. So, if you’re being forced to use knives or scissors to prise a toy or tool out of an impenetrable plastic case, don’t keep your feelings under wraps. Let the manufacturers know that their way of packing items just isn’t your bag. As well as wasting customers’ time, unnecessary over-packaging also wastes precious resources. What’s more, it leaves us all with extra rubbish to dispose of. An ideal way to mark the occasion is to avoid unnecessary packaging as much as possible. This is a day to bypass burger cartons, say no to supermarket plastic bags and do some thinking outside the box!

Aged Care Employee Day
It’s something people commonly joke about as the years go by, especially when parents start getting on our young nerves. “Remember Dad; I’m the one that gets to pick what Home you go into,” With Home meaning that universal spectre of every independent adult, the Adult Care Facility. While many of us would never dream of sending our parents someplace horrible, it’s important to remember the men and women who make those facilities a warm and welcoming place when it comes time. Aged Care Employee Day reminds us that there is someone who’s hands we place the care of our elderly in when we’re not there to care for them ourselves.

Disc Golf Day
Disc golf is played much like traditional golf. Instead of a ball and clubs, however, players use a flying disc or Frisbee®. The sport was formalized in the 1970’s, and shares with traditional golf the object of completing each hole in the fewest strokes (or, in the case of disc golf, fewest throws). While there are a lot of elements that are shared with the traditional game of golf, there are also a lot of key differences as well. For instance, rather than using a ball and clubs, the only gear that is required is a Frisbee or a disc. Players are going to begin from a tee pad, which is typically a rectangular area that is made of cement, rubber, or even brick. Once a person has thrown, they are going to progress down the fairway. From where the disc lands, the player is going to keep throwing again and again until the disc lands on the target; just like a golfer does until they get the disc into the hole. As is the case with conventional golf, the total number of throws a player takes to get the disc to the target is equal to their score for the hole. The person with the lowest score is going to win the game. There are a lot of benefits that are associated with disc golf as well. For example, playing conventional golf can be very expensive. Not only do you need to purchase a set of golf clubs, a trolley, and some golf balls, but you are probably going to need to pay for membership to one of your local golf courses as well. The costs can quickly mount up, and this is why golf is known as being one of the most expensive sports to enjoy. However, this is something you are not going to need to worry about with disc golf, as it is a lot cheaper. There are no memberships or fees to worry about, nor do you need to fit in with their tee times as well.
It is also great that all ages and abilities are able to play disc golf. It is a sport that provides a great low-impact, cardiovascular workout, which can test both your mental determination and physical skill. It is also a social sport, giving you the opportunity to spend time with others and have a good laugh in the process.

Sandcastle Day
Few childhood memories are looked back upon more fondly than building sandcastles on the beach with the hot sun overhead, the cool water washing over your feet ever now and the fleeting beauty of the castles themselves that disappear the moment the tide comes in…there’s no doubt about it, childhood sandcastle memories are magic. Be honest: when was the last time you actually built a sandcastle, either with your child, friends, or even all on your own? This Sandcastle Day it’s time to find a couple of hours to remember just how wonderful building sandcastles at the beach can be.

Professional Speakers Day
This is the day to embrace those that stand up on a stage, and speak about any topic, informing, educating and embracing the very natures they espouse. So help them celebrate Professional Speakers Day by stepping up and learning something today!

A Selection of Birthdays

1282 Elizabeth of Rhuddlan, youngest daughter of King Edward I and Queen Eleanor of Castile, born in Rhuddlan Castle, Denbighshire (d. 1316)
1574 Robert Dudley, Explorer & writer (Arcano del Mare), born in Richmond Palace, Surrey (d. 1649)
1783 John Heathcoat, English inventor of lace-making machinery, born in Duffield, Derbyshire (d. 1861)
1783 Princess Amelia, youngest child of King George III born Royal Lodge, Windsor (d. 1810)
1818 Henry Litolff, French composer and pianist, born in London (d. 1891)
1823 Faustina Hasse Hodges, English-American composer, born in Malmesbury (d. 1895)
1860 Alan Leo, British astrologer, born in Westminster (d. 1917)
1868 Granville Bantock, Composer & conductor (Hebridean Symphony), born in London (d. 1946)
1872 William Auchterlonie, Scottish golfer (British Open 1893), born in St. Andrews, (d. 1963)
1876 Mata Hari [Margaretha Geertruida Zelle], Dutch exotic dancer, courtesan and convicted German WWI spy, born in Leeuwarden, Netherlands (d. 1917)
1884 Billie Burke [Mary William Ethelbert Appleton], American actress (The Wizard of Oz, Merrily We Live), born in Washington, D.C. (d. 1970)
1885 Gordon Harker, Actor (Facts of Love, Champagne, Inspector Hornleigh), born London, (d. 1967)
1899 Irene "Renie" Riano, English-born American actress [The Family Jewels], born London (d. 1971)
1903 Louis Leakey, British paleoanthropologist and archaeologist (1964 Richard Hooper Medal), born in Kabete, Kenya (d. 1972)
1914 Ted Moore, South African-British cinematographer (James Bond), born in Western Cape, South Africa (d. 1987)
1924 Kenneth Kendall, British broadcaster (BBC News, Treasure Hunt), born in British India (d. 2012)
1926 John Woodcock OBE, Cricket journalist ('The Times' 1954-88; Wisden Cricketers' Almanack 1981-86; President Cricket Writers' Club 1986-2004), born in Longparish, Hampshire (d. 2021)
1929 James Pilditch, British designer, born in Buckinghamshire (d. 1995)
1932 Edward Hardwicke, British actor (Sherlock Holmes), born in London (d. 2011)
1932 Abebe Bikila, Ethiopian Olympic marathon champion (Olympic gold, marathon 1960, 64) and Africa's first world record breaking athlete in any sport, won the 1960 Olympics marathon barefoot, born in Jato, Ethiopian Empire (d. 1973)
1937 Don Wilson, Cricketer (England slow left-armer between 1963-71), born Settle, Cumbria (d. 2012)
1938 Dewi Lorwerth Ellis Bebb, Welsh rugby union player, born in Wales, (d. 1996)
1944 Robert Mueller, American lawyer, FBI Director (2001-13) Special Counsel Russian Investigation (2017-), born in New York City, New York
1949 Tim[othy] Renwick, British rock guitarist (Sutherland Brothers & Quiver), born in Cambridge
1952 Alexei Sayle, British comedian, born in Anfield, Liverpool,
1958 Bruce Dickinson, English heavy metal rocker (Iron Maiden-Run to Hills), born in Worksop,
1960 Jacquie O'Sullivan, English singer and songwriter (Bananarama-Venus), born in London
1961 Walter Swinburn, English jockey (The Derby winner, 1981), born in Oxford (d. 2016)
1967 Charlotte Lewis, British actress (Golden Child, Pirates), born in London
1971 Dominic Cork, Cricketer (England all-rounder Hat-trick v WI 1995), born Newcastle-under-Lyme
1977 Samantha Ronson, British DJ, born in Camden, London
1983 Tina O'Brien, British actress, born in Manchester

On This Day in British History

1573 Francis Drake's fleet returns to Plymouth after a year spent raiding for Spanish treasure
1606 Possible first performance of Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth, performed in the Great Hall at Hampton Court Palace for King James I
1710 Sidney, 1st Earl of Godolphin resigns as English minister of Finance
1914 Engagement between British cruiser HMS Gloucester and German cruisers SMS Breslau and SMS Goeben off Greece
1940 Largest amount paid for a stamp ($45,000 for 1 1856 British Guiana)
1956 British government sends 3 aircraft carriers to Egypt

Northern Ireland

1971 A Catholic man is shot dead by a British soldier in Belfast

Wales

1485 Henry Tudor's (Henry VII to be) army lands in Milford Haven, South Wales

Deaths in History

1485 Alexander Stewart, 1st Duke of Albany, Scottish prince
1613 Thomas Fleming, English judge (b. 1544)
1657 Robert Blake, English admiral (Dover, Dungeness), dies at about 57
1799 John Bacon, English sculptor, dies at 58
1995 Tom Scott, Scottish poet (Sea Dirge: A Mither's Keenin), dies at 77
1997 Douglas Gray, Scottish record and film producer, dies at 74
1997 Vincent Gulliver, Britain's oldest man, dies at 109
2004 Colin Bibby, English ornithologist (b. 1948)
2011 Nancy Wake, New Zealand-born World War II secret agent (Special Operations Executive), dies at 98

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Post by Richard Frost » Sun Aug 08 2021 11:22am

Sunday August 8th, 2021

International Cat Day
International Cat Day is a full 24 hours of recognition and veneration of one of humanity’s oldest and most beloved pets. The festivities were put together for the first time in 2002 by IFAW, the International Fund for Animal Welfare, among other animal rights groups, to celebrate the most popular pet on the planet.
An estimated 500 million cats are thought to be frolicking in neighbours’ gardens across the world, which means that most every extended family is bound to have an aunt with more kittens than former husbands, whatever the country or climate. And that’s great, because owning a cat has been shown to improve mental health and to relieve stress, anxiety and depression. So when it’s raining cats and dogs outside and you don’t have someone to cuddle with, any black, ginger, Persian, Siamese, Burmese, Bengal, Shorthair, Munchkin, Balinese, RagaMuffin or any old stray cat will do the trick. So roll out the red carpet and the catnip for your furry feline friend, because International Cat Day is that one day a year when black cats bring good luck and cat eye sunglasses match your entire wardrobe.

Happiness Happens Day
Happiness Happens Day is all about having unlimited amounts of happiness. What more could you possibly want from a day? This is a day about sharing one’s happiness and bringing a lot of joy to other people’s lives. Happiness Happens Day encourages happiness throughout the full day. It is about recognizing every moment of pleasure, delight, and sheer joy. Don’t let these moments pass. After all, they are extra special! Ralph Waldo Emerson once said: “For every minute you are angry you lose sixty seconds of happiness.” We certainly agree with this! Another element of the day is about not squashing other people’s happiness. If we are all honest, there have been moments whereby we are irritated by other people’s happiness. This could be simply because we are not having a very good day. It could be because their happiness reminds us of a moment in our lives whereby we were not happy. Whatever the reason, it can happen! Nevertheless, it is important to realize that our bad days do not give us the right to squash another person’s happiness. Instead, we should allow their happiness to make us feel that way. Their smile can make us smile, and the same goes in the other direction as well. If you notice someone else who is down, you can try to make them smile.

Scottish Wildcat Day
The Highland Tiger has been roaming these lands since time immemorial, in fact, when it first appeared in Scotland it was clear that it had crossed the land bridge from Europe to the British Isles. As the lands became more civilized and man began competing for the wild game birds that live there, they also began killing off the native population of the Scottish Wildcat. They’re a beautiful and iconic part of Scotland, but they’re slowly disappearing. Every year they face threats that dwindle their numbers, from predation to being bred out by domesticated species. In 1981 Scotland recognized the dangers its native wildcat was in and took strides to help protect it under the United Kingdom’s Wildlife and Countryside Act. In spite of their efforts, it’s unlikely that truly pure wildcats remain thanks to hybridization. Unfortunately, that’s not the only threat that domesticated cats pose to wildcats, their intermingling also brings disease to them, including feline calicivirus and the fatal feline leukaemia virus. Scottish Wildcat Day reminds us of the importance of protecting species like this, that have a long and august history but are slowly dwindling from the world.

Top 8 Challenge Day
Most people are familiar with the feeling of an uncomfortable digestive system. We all get occasional stomach aches, indigestion, heartburn and other tummy problems. However, for some people, dealing with gastrointestinal issues is something that they have to do every day. Top 8 Challenge Day is designed to raise awareness of this, and specifically of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGIDs). An EGID is a gastrointestinal disorder that can cause a range of symptoms, such as pain, nausea, acid reflux and trouble swallowing (dysphagia). There is no cure for the illness but there are some ways to help control it. Many people with EGIDs have restricted diets, with common allergens and irritants removed. This can be frustrating, making it difficult to eat a healthy diet and to eat socially, as well as having an emotional impact. Top 8 Challenge Day issues a challenge to remove the top eight allergens from your diet, which is what many with EGIDs have to do. The top allergens are milk, eggs, wheat, fish, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and shellfish.

Odie Day
Odie Day celebrates the fictional character from the famous Garfield comic strip created by the iconic cartoonist Jim Davis. Odie has also appeared in Garfield and friends, two live-action feature films and three amazing CGI feature length films. Odie is the only character to mature in the Garfield cartoon universe. Odie is characterized as a tremendously credulous and brainless dog, but he is also shown as extremely caring and loving. Garfield is seen to play on Odie’s gullibility by pushing him off objects or by simply making fun of him! Nevertheless, their relationship is distinguished by their playfulness and love for one another. It is time to get the streamers, party-poppers and Oreo ice-cream cake out and celebrate the existence of this adorable pooch. Despite his inability to formally communicate, I am sure this beagle will be thinking about us in his undersized canine brain. Have an Odie themed party; where all guests dress up as a character from the beloved Garfield cartoon strip and raise your glasses to Odie!

A selection of Birthdays

1571 John Ward, English composer, born in Canterbury (d. 1638)
1673 John Ker, Scottish spy, born John Crawford in Crawfurdland, Ayrshire, was a Scots Presbyterian linked with Cameronian radicals who between 1705 and 1709 acted as a government informer against the Jacobites. Dogged by financial issues most of his life, he died in King's Bench Prison (d. 1726)
1694 Francis Hutcheson, Irish philosopher (d. 1746)
1861 William Bateson, English biologist (originator of term "genetics") (d. 1926)
1871 William Henry Squire, ARCM was a British cellist, composer and music professor of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He studied cello at the Royal College of Music, and became professor of cello at the Royal College and Guildhall schools of music. He was principal cello in several major London orchestras (d. 1963)
1887 Esme Percy, British actor (Murder!, Pygmalion, Old Spanish Custom), born in London (d. 1957)
1887 Malcolm Keen, British actor (The Lodger, The Manxman, The Murder Party), born Bristol (d.1970)
1902 Paul Dirac, English physicist (quantum electrodynamics, Nobel 1933), born Bristol (d.1984)
1909 Bill Voce, cricketer (England left-arm bodyline bowler) English cricketer who played for Nottinghamshire and England. (d.1984)
1914 Arthur Frederick Holt, was a hosiery manufacturer and Liberal Party politician in the United Kingdom, and Member of Parliament for thirteen years. born in Bolton. He was educated at Mill Hill School and Victoria University of Manchester. In 1939 he married Kathleen Mary Openshaw, MBE. They had one son and one daughter. He played Rugby for Bolton RUFC.(d.1995)
1914 Unity Mitford, English fascist sympathizer and one of the Mitford sisters, born London (d. 1948)
1922 Rudi Gernreich, designer (1st women's topless swimsuit, miniskirt) (d.1985)
1928 Lord Alfred Hayes, English pro wrestler, manager and commentator (WWF), born London (d.2005)
1929 Ronnie Biggs, English criminal (Great Train Robbery of 1963), born Stockwell, London (d.2013)
1930 Terence Joseph Nation was a Welsh screenwriter and novelist. Especially known for his work in British television science fiction, he created the Daleks and Davros for Doctor Who, as well as the series Survivors and Blake's 7. (d.1997)
1931 Roger Penrose, Physicist (2020 Nobel Prize for Physics for work on black holes), born Colchester,
1936 Keith Barron, English actor & television presenter, appeared in films and on television from 1961 until 2017. His television roles included the police drama The Odd Man, the sitcom Duty Free, and Gregory Wilmot in Upstairs, Downstairs. Born, Mexborough (d. 2017)
1937 Dustin Hoffman, American actor (The Graduate; Tootsie; Kramer vs Kramer; Ishtar), born in Los Angeles, California
1942 Henery Hawk [misspelled as Henry], Warner Bros. cartoon character created by Chuck Jones (Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series), first debuts in "The Squawkin' Hawk"
1944 John Renbourn, jazz & folk guitarist/songwriter (Pentangle), born Marleybone, London (d. 2015)
1953 Nigel Mansell, British auto racer (World F1 champion 1992, Indy Car 1993), born in Upton-upon-Severn,
1955 Ali Score, rock drummer (Flock Of Seagulls)
1956 Chris Foreman [Chrissy Boy], English guitarist (Madness-Burning Down the House), born in London
1961 The Edge [Dave Evans], rock guitarist (U2-I Will Follow), born in London
1964 Paul Taylor, cricketer (England left-arm pace bowler in one Test 1993)
1965 Angus Fraser, cricketer (England right-arm pace bowler 1989- )
1966 Christopher Livingstone Eubank is a British former professional boxer who competed from 1985 to 1998. He held the WBO middleweight and super-middleweight titles between 1990 and 1995, and is ranked by BoxRec as the third best British super-middleweight boxer of all time. He reigned as world champion for over five years, was undefeated in his first ten years as a professional, and remained undefeated at middleweight.
1974 Andy Priaulx, British race car driver
1978 Alan Maybury, Irish footballer
1979 Richard Harwood, British cellist
1979 Sam Totman, English musician (Dragonforce)
1981 Roger Federer, Swiss tennis player (20 Grand Slam singles titles), born in Bottmingen, Switzerland
1981 Bradley McIntosh, British pop singer
1982 David Florence, British canoeist
1983 Guy Burnet, British actor
1987 Katie Leung, Scottish actress
1988 Beatrice, Princes of York, British daughter of Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson, born in London

On this day in British History

1549 Henry II of France declares war on England and orders the siege of Boulogne
1647 The Irish Confederate Wars and Wars of the Three Kingdoms: Battle of Dungans Hill - English Parliamentary forces defeat Irish forces.
1758 British troops occupy & plunder Cherbourg
1843 Natal (in South Africa) is made a British colony
1914 3rd pole expedition Ernest Shackleton "Endurance"
1918 World War I: The Allies launch the Hundred Days Offensive, beginning with the Battle of Amiens where 500 tanks and 10 Allied divisions attacked German lines
1919 Treaty of Rawalpindi, British recognise Afghanistan's independence
1924 British-Russian trade agreement signed
1940 31 German aircraft shot down over England
1942 "Monty" appointed commander of British 8th Army at Alamein
1945 England & Australian Services draw 4th Victory Test
1963 Great Train Robbery £2.6 million stolen
1987 Pakistan all out 708 v England at The Oval, Botham 3-217
1991 Shi'ite Muslims release British hostage John McCarthy

Northern Ireland

1971 A British soldier is shot dead by the Irish Republican Army in Belfast

Weddings in History

1502 Jacobus IV of Scotland marries Margaretha Tudor

Deaths in History

1827 George Canning, British Prime Minister (Tory: 1827) and Foreign Secretary, dies in office at 57
1968 Orovida Camille Pissarro, British painter and etcher, dies at 74
1979 Nicholas Monsarrat, British novelist (b. 1910)
1994 Robin Cavendish, English campaigner for the disabled, dies at 64
2014 Charles Keating, English actor, dies from lung cancer at 72

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Post by Richard Frost » Mon Aug 09 2021 10:40am

9th August 2021

International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples
The International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples is observed on 9 August each year to raise awareness and protect the rights of the world's indigenous population. This event also recognizes the achievements and contributions that indigenous people make to improve world issues such as environmental protection. It was first pronounced by the United Nations General Assembly in December 1994, marking the day of the first meeting of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations of the Sub-Commission on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights in 1982.

Melon Day
Cantaloupe, Honeydew, and Galia Melons, just to name a few. These are the fruits we celebrate on Melon Day, a day dedicated to all forms of muskmelon, and one in particular. If you’re a lover of fresh crisp melon on a hot day, then you already know why it deserves a day of its own. But let us tell you of the Turkmenbashi melon, a melon of pride in Turkmenistan.


Learn about Melon Day
Melon Day has been designed to pay tribute to this tasty ingredient. As mentioned, it started off as a holiday in Turkmenistan. However, it is now celebrated in many different places around the world. If you are someone who enjoys eating this tasty fruit in any sort of variety, you can definitely celebrate Melon Day. You may even want to use this date as an opportunity to try a variety of melon that you have never tried before. The Turkmenbashi melon, in particular, has been praised for its large size, taste, and aroma. It is a type of muskmelon. Other varieties of muskmelon include casaba, Crenshaw, and the ever-popular Honeydew. They are characterised by their smooth skin. There are a lot of different benefits that are associated with eating muskmelons. This includes the fact that they promote good digestion. They also regulate blood pressure, promote hair growth, improve skin healthy, and they are good for eyesight and also immunity. These fruits are also very hydrating and they are filled with different nutrients. So, not only do they taste good, but they are going to add so many benefits to your diet. This is why it makes sense to use Melon Day as the perfect opportunity to indulge in this super tasty and highly beneficial fruit. You can even spend some time learning a little bit more about different kinds of melons, finding out where they have come from and the sort of benefits they provide.

Book Lovers Day
From the scent of a rare first edition book found in an old time book collection, to a crisp, fresh book at the local supermarket, the very sight of a book can bring back memories. Reading as a child, enjoying the short stories, the long books and the ability to lose yourself in a story so powerful that at the end your asking yourself where to get the next book in the series. This is for the reader in all of us, the celebration of Book Lovers Day! While the day’s origins may be shrouded in mystery and rumour, the books themselves are not. Started from carving on stone tablets, the book was designed to make portable the writings and drawings of those that could not carry around stone tablets. Originally it was parchment or vellum (calf skin, in case you were wondering) was bound tightly with a wooden cover.
Often the wooden cover was tightly wrapped in leather to prevent the wood from getting wet and had clasps or straps to hold it shut. In the more modern age, printing capabilities made books cheaper, and easier, to print. The printing press, the typewriter, and the computer all had an effect on the market of books. But more so than most, is the upsurge in electronic devices that can be used to read on. Computers, tablets, and most cell phones now have the ability to read books, making it that much easier to carry around a small library to enjoy not matter where you are.

Rice Pudding Day
Nothing tastes quite as good as a homemade rice pudding from your favourite rice pudding recipe. Rice Pudding Day challenges you not only to indulge in more adventurous rice pudding recipes, from rum’n’raisin to more unusual ingredients like lychees and nuts.

A Selection of Birthdays

1201 Arnold Fitz Thedmar, English chronicler of the mayors and sheriffs of London in 1188–1274, born in London (d. 1274, death reported 1275)
1593 Izaak Walton, English biographer and author (The Compleat Angler), born in Stafford (d. 1683)
1653 John Oldham, English satirical poet, born in Shipton Moyne, Gloucestershire (d. 1683)
1757 Thomas Telford, Scottish civil engineer (designed and constructed Menai Bridge, Wales in 1819-26), born in Eskdale, Dumfriesshire (d. 1834)
1797 Charles Robert Malden, British naval officer (discoverer of Malden Island, central Pacific), born in Putney, London (d. 1855)
1805 Joseph Locke, English railway and civil engineer, born in Attercliffe, Sheffield (d. 1860)
1869 Randle Ayrton, British actor (The Manxman, Nell Gwyn), born in Chester (d. 1940)
1875 Albert William Ketèlbey, British pianist and composer (In A Monastery Garden), born in Aston, Birmingham (d. 1959)
1899 P.L. [Pamela Lyndon] Travers, Australian British writer (Mary Poppins), born in Maryborough, Australia (d. 1996)
1905 Elizabeth Lane, 1st female British supreme court justice, born in Bowden, Cheshire (d. 1988)
1905 Leo Genn, British lawyer and actor (Mourning Becomes Electra, Moby-Dick, Affair in Monte Carlo), born in London (d. 1978)
1914 Joe Mercer OBE, English soccer midfielder (5 caps; Everton, Arsenal) and manager (Manchester City, Aston Villa, England 1974), born in Ellesmere Port, Cheshire (d. 1990)
1922 Philip Larkin, English poet and writer (North Ship, Jill), born in Radford, Coventry (d. 1985)
1927 Robert Shaw, British actor, novelist, and playwright (Deep, Jaws, Sting, Black Sunday), born in Westhoughton, Lancashire (d. 1978)
1933 Albert Quixall, English soccer inside-forward (5 caps; Sheffield Wednesday, Manchester United), born in Sheffield (d. 2020)
1944 Vivian Martin Prince, British drummer (Pretty Things - "Honey I Need"), born in Loughborough. He played in a variety of bands during the 1960s. He was noted for his wild and eccentric behaviour, which garnered a lot of publicity for the group and influenced Keith Moon.
1944 George Armstrong, English soccer winger and manager (Arsenal 500 games; Kuwait 1988-89), born in Hebburn, County Durham (d. 2000)
1945 Posy Simmonds, English cartoonist (Gemma Bovery), born in Berkshire
1954 Pete Thomas, British drummer (Elvis Costello), born in Sheffield
1962 Michael "Mick" Conroy, British bassist (Modern English - "I Melt With You")
1962 Yinka Shonibare, British Nigerian artist (Nelson's Ship in a Bottle), born in London
1963 Whitney Houston, American singer ("I Will Always Love You"; "I Wanna Dance With Somebody"), actress (The Bodyguard), and film producer (The Princess Diaries)born in Newark, New Jersey (d. 2012)
1973 Kevin McKidd, Scottish actor Trainspotting; Grey's Anatomy -"Owen Hunt", born in Elgin, Moray
1974 Nicola Stapleton, English actress (Eastenders), born in London
1976 Rhona Mitra, English actress, born in London
1976 Aled Haydn Jones, Welsh radio producer (head of BBC Radio One), born in Aberystwyth

On This Day in British History

1655 Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell divides England into 11 districts
1673 Dutch under Admiral Cornelis Evertsen de Jonge recapture NY from English; regained in 1674
1757 English Fort William Henry, NY, surrenders to French & Indians troops
1778 Captain James Cook reaches Cape Prince of Wales, Bering Straits
1815 Napoleon Bonaparte sets sail for exile on St Helena on board British ship the Northumberland
1877 Henry Morton Stanley's party reaches Boma, Congo, after 999 days, losing half of the 228 members.
1902 Edward VII of Great Britain crowned King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, succeeding his mother Queen Victoria
1907 1st Boy Scout camp concludes at Brownsea Island in Poole Harbour, Dorset
1914 German U-15 was sunk by the British cruiser, H.M.S. Birmingham
1915 British attack at Chanak Bair at Gallipoli during WWI
1915 British naval officer David Beatty is confirmed in the rank of vice-admiral
1941 Winston Churchill reaches Newfoundland for talks with US President Franklin D. Roosevelt
1979 English seaside resort Brighton gets 1st British nude beach
1981 Six English lifeguards set relay swim record English Channel (7:17)

Northern Ireland

1971 Operation Demetrius (or Internment) is introduced in Northern Ireland allowing suspected terrorists to be indefinitely detained without trial; the security forces arrested 342 people suspected of supporting paramilitaries
1972 There is widespread and severe rioting in Nationalist areas of Northern Ireland on the anniversary of the introduction of Internment
1998 British Senior Open Men's Golf, Royal Portrush GC: Welshman Brian Huggett beats Eddie Pollard of Northern Ireland by a stroke on the first playoff hole

Wales

1998 British Senior Open Men's Golf, Royal Portrush GC: Welshman Brian Huggett beats Eddie Pollard of Northern Ireland by a stroke on the first playoff hole

Deaths in History

1634 William Noy, English jurist (b. 1577)
1720 Simon Ockley, English orientalist (b. 1678)
1744 James Brydges, 1st Duke of Chandos, English patron of the arts (George Frideric Handel) (b. 1673)
1848 Frederick Marryat, English captain and author (Mr Midshipman Easy), dies
1886 Samuel Ferguson, Northern Irish poet and artist (b. 1810)
1899 Edward Frankland, British structural chemist who co-discovered helium and developed the theory of valence, dies on holiday in Norway at 74
1915 Henry Longbottom, English lieutenant, dies in battle
1969 Cecil Frank Powell, English physicist who discovered pion (pi-meson), a subatomic particle (Nobel 1950), dies at 65
1992 Patrick Devlin, English judge and legal philosopher, dies at 86
1996 Sir Frank Whittle, English RAF engineer air officer and inventor of the turbojet engine, dies at 89
2015 David Nobbs, English comedic writer (The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin), dies at 80

macliam
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Re: On this day

Post by macliam » Mon Aug 09 2021 1:58pm

August 9 1690

The first siege of Limerick commenced when William of Orange, pursuing Jacobite forces defeated at the Boyne, encamped just outside the walls of the old city with an army of about 26,000. There were about the same number of Jacobite defenders, but they were not as well armed.

William could not immediately engage in the siege, as his entire train of siege cannon and ammunition had been destroyed in a raid at Ballyneety, Co.Limerick by 600 Jacobite calvary led by the raparee, Michael Hogan.

When replacement artillery eventually arrived from Waterford, William breached the city walls and sent in his elite Danish grenadiers. However, earthworks inside the walls impeded their attack and the grenadiers and all eight regiments who followed them into the breach suffered terribly from musketry and cannon fire at point blank range - and the population of the city (famously the women) lined the walls and threw stones, bottles and rubbish at the attackers.

After three and a half hours of fighting, William finally called off the assault, having suffered 3,000 casualties, including many of the best Dutch, Danish, German and Huguenot troops in his army - the Jacobites lost only 400 men in the battle (yet, somehow, this rout seems to be ignored by history.... :roll: )

Michael Hogan escaped capture when the Jacobites were eventually tricked into surrender (Limerick is still known as "the City of the Broken Treaty") and eventually ended up in Portugal, where, as a Brigadier general in 1712, he led 1000 troops to defeat a Spanish army of 20,000 at Campo Maior in the Alentejo.
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macliam
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Re: On this day

Post by macliam » Mon Aug 09 2021 2:21pm

PS - "1915 Henry Longbottom, English lieutenant, dies in battle" intrigued me.

It seems he was a 2nd Lieutenant in the South Lancashire Regiment and died at the age of 21 in the Gallipoli campaign, where my Grandfather also fought.

Whilst a photograph of him exists in the IWM, little more seems to make him stand out from all the others who died at Gallipoli in 1915, so it seems a strange little footnote.

However, whatever the circumstances, RIP.


PPS - I find that his brother, 2nd Lt Robert Longbottom, aged 19, died at Ypres 10 days earlier. A sad connection, but not uncommon in a war wher many brothers were killed during the same battles.

Image
Henry Longbottom
Image
Robert Longbottom
Last edited by macliam on Mon Aug 09 2021 2:36pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: On this day

Post by Richard Frost » Mon Aug 09 2021 2:35pm

I am unable to offer any further information. I find that the websites I use are often very random and are often incomplete. Invariably I find myself searching for more information on most days. My curiosity leads me to some strange and unconnected places at times. I am glad that you take the time to read and research some of the information provided and then take the time to post in response.
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Re: On this day

Post by macliam » Mon Aug 09 2021 2:49pm

Richard Frost wrote:
Mon Aug 09 2021 2:35pm
I am unable to offer any further information. I find that the websites I use are often very random and are often incomplete. Invariably I find myself searching for more information on most days. My curiosity leads me to some strange and unconnected places at times.
The connections are fascinating, as per my addition above, I did find that his younger brother had been killed 10 days before, but nothing else, so why he gets a mention (in many places with no further information) I don't know.

However, it brings back to mind the loss of a generation due to the horrors of WW1 - and even those who survived, like my Grandfather, suffered the consequences thereafter. Pop received a war pension due to Malaria contracted at Gallipoli and, after being bedridden for several years, eventually died in his early sixties from renal failure, resulting from having been gassed on Western Front.
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